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I have a number of XML files containing lots of overhead. I wish to keep only about 20 specific elements and filter out anything else. I know all the names of the elements I want to keep, I also know whether or not they are child elements and who are their parents. These elements that I want to keep after the transformation need to still have their original hierarchic placement.

E.g. I want to keep ONLY

<ns:currency>

in;

<ns:stuff>
 <ns:things>
  <ns:currency>somecurrency</ns:currency>
  <ns:currency_code/>
  <ns:currency_code2/>
  <ns:currency_code3/>
  <ns:currency_code4/>
 </ns:things>
</ns:stuff>

And make it look like this;

<ns:stuff>
 <ns:things>
  <ns:currency>somecurrency</ns:currency>
 </ns:things>
</ns:stuff>

What would be the best way of constructing an XSLT to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
1  
    
In that example you specify which elements to leave out, I need to specify the elements to leave in and filter out anything else. –  cc0 Apr 26 '11 at 12:13
    
I agree with MarcoS. It is a duplicate. The accepted answer is pretty much what you need –  Lukas Eder Apr 26 '11 at 12:16
1  
Good question, +1. See my answer for a general solution that can be used to preserve any element whose name is in a "white-list" and also preserve the structural relationships of these elements in the document. You can always use this transformation for any such kind of task. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 26 '11 at 13:08
1  
Also added extensive explanation. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 26 '11 at 13:18
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This general transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:ns="some:ns">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <ns:WhiteList>
  <name>ns:currency</name>
  <name>ns:currency_code3</name>
 </ns:WhiteList>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match=
  "*[not(descendant-or-self::*[name()=document('')/*/ns:WhiteList/*])]"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document (with namespace definition added to make it well-formed):

<ns:stuff xmlns:ns="some:ns">
    <ns:things>
        <ns:currency>somecurrency</ns:currency>
        <ns:currency_code/>
        <ns:currency_code2/>
        <ns:currency_code3/>
        <ns:currency_code4/>
    </ns:things>
</ns:stuff>

produces the wanted result (white-listed elements and their structural relations are preserved):

<ns:stuff xmlns:ns="some:ns">
   <ns:things>
      <ns:currency>somecurrency</ns:currency>
      <ns:currency_code3/>
   </ns:things>
</ns:stuff>

Explanation:

  1. The identity rule/template copies all nodes "as-is".

  2. The stylesheet contains a top-level <ns:WhiteList> element whose <name> children specify all white-listed element's names -- the elements that are to be preserved with their structural relationships in the document.

  3. The <ns:WhiteList> element is best kept in a separate document so that the current stylesheet will not need to be edited with new names. Here the whitelist is in the same stylesheet just for convenience.

  4. One single template is overriding the identity template. It doesn't process (deletes) any element that is not white-listed and has no descendent that is white-listed.

share|improve this answer
    
What does 'node()|@*' matches exactly? –  snoofkin Apr 26 '11 at 13:50
2  
@soulSurfer2010: every node() (element, text, comment processing instruction) and every attribute. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 26 '11 at 14:33
1  
@Alejandro: Yes, but I am providing a more general solution that solves a whole class of such problems. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 26 '11 at 17:29
1  
@cc0: In such more complicated cases the white-listing table looses its advantages. The best and most flexible way forward in such cases is having templates like <xsl:template match="teacher/number"/>. This template ignores any teacher/number elements (effextively "deleting" them. All such templates should be put (for best flexibility and convenience) in a separate <xsl:stylesheet> and it should be imported (<xsl:import>) from the primary stylesheet of the XSLT application. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 27 '11 at 12:55
1  
@cc0: You are welcome. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 27 '11 at 13:32
show 6 more comments

In XSLT you usually don't remove the elements you want to drop, but you copy the elements you want to keep:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet 
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    xmlns:ns="http://www.example.com/ns#"
    version="1.0">

    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes" omit-xml-declaration="no"/>

     <xsl:template match="/ns:stuff">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="ns:things"/>
        </xsl:copy>
     </xsl:template>

     <xsl:template match="ns:things">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="ns:currency"/>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="ns:currency_code3"/>                   
        </xsl:copy>
     </xsl:template>

     <xsl:template match="ns:currency">
        <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
     </xsl:template>

     <xsl:template match="ns:currency_code3">
        <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
     </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

The example above copies only currency and currency_code3. The output is as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<ns:stuff xmlns:ns="http://www.example.com/ns#">
   <ns:things>
      <ns:currency>somecurrency</ns:currency>
      <ns:currency_code3/>
   </ns:things>
</ns:stuff>

Note: I added a namespace declaration for your prefix ns.

If you want to copy everything except a few elements, you may see this answer

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thank you! –  cc0 Apr 26 '11 at 13:05
    
You may be interested to see a more general solution, provided in my answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 26 '11 at 13:19
    
-1 This doesn't produce the desired output. –  user357812 Apr 26 '11 at 16:43
    
@Alejandro: as usual your comments are correct :) I updated my code, and now it should be OK. Any further comment is welcome and useful to learn. –  MarcoS Apr 27 '11 at 6:24
    
+1 Now it produces the desired output. Deleting comments. –  user357812 Apr 27 '11 at 13:01
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