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This is one of those annoying things where you know the answer is easy, but you just can't see it.

The printf statement in AllocIntArray shows that arrayPtr is correctly being assigned a memory location, however when the printf statement in main is run, it shows arrayB is still set to NULL.

Can someone show me what I am doing wrong when passing in arrayB to AllocIntArray?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void AllocIntArray(int *arrayPtr, int numElements);

int main()
{
   int *arrayB = NULL;

   AllocIntArray(arrayB, 10);
   printf("Pointer: %p\n", arrayB);

   free(arrayB);

   getchar();
   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

void AllocIntArray(int *arrayPtr, int numElements)
{
   arrayPtr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int) * numElements);
   printf("Pointer: %p\n", arrayPtr);

   if(arrayPtr == NULL)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "\nError allocating memory using malloc");
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
   }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I think you arg arrayPtr should be pointer-to-pointer to be able to allocate and see outside it's function scope. so int **arrayPtr –  Tony The Lion Apr 26 '11 at 12:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Pass the double pointer.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void AllocIntArray(int **arrayPtr, int numElements);

int main()
{
   int *arrayB = NULL;

   AllocIntArray(&arrayB, 10);
   printf("Pointer: %p\n", arrayB);

   free(arrayB);

   getchar();
   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

void AllocIntArray(int **arrayPtr, int numElements)
{
   *arrayPtr = malloc(sizeof(int) * numElements);
   printf("Pointer: %p\n", *arrayPtr);

   if(*arrayPtr == NULL)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "\nError allocating memory using malloc");
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, but I hesitated - please don't cast malloc return values. –  paxdiablo Apr 26 '11 at 12:44
    
@paxdiablo, isn't that just a matter of programmer preference? –  Chris Paynter Apr 26 '11 at 12:46
    
@Chris, casting it can hide certain errors and warnings from the compiler, which will make your life more difficult. For example: faq.cprogramming.com/cgi-bin/… –  paxdiablo Apr 26 '11 at 12:50
    
@paxdiablo good to know, thanks for the tip. –  Chris Paynter Apr 26 '11 at 12:51
    
When programming, never do things you don't know the reasons behind. Casting the result from malloc is one of those things. Most of the time people cast it without thinking because their C++ compiler gave a warning... that is, they are using the wrong compiler and hides it behind explicit type casts. –  Lundin Apr 26 '11 at 14:07

That's because arrayB is passed to AllocIntArray by value. Either pass it by reference (with a pointer-to-pointer), or better, return it from AllocIntArray:

int *AllocIntArray(int numElements)
{
   int *arrayPtr = malloc(sizeof(int) * numElements);
   printf("Pointer: %p\n", arrayPtr);

   if(arrayPtr == NULL)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "\nError allocating memory using malloc");
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
   }
   return arrayPtr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Another good way of doing it (especially if it avoids the problems most newbies have with indirect pointers. But, again, why are you casting the return from malloc? –  paxdiablo Apr 26 '11 at 12:47
    
@paxdiablo: I copy-pasted the OP's code and made minimal changes to it to demonstrate my intentions. Removed the malloc return cast as well. –  larsmans Apr 26 '11 at 13:19

You need to brush up a bit on parameter passing to functions.

The pointer you are sending to AllocIntArray is being copied into arrayPtr, The line

   arrayPtr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int) * numElements);

assigns a value into the copy, and not the original variable, and therefore the original variable still points to nowhere.

First solution that comes to mind is to send a pointer to that pointer, but I think you'd best do some general brushing up on the matter of parameter passing before going much further.

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I just haven't done much pointer to a pointer excercises in my class work so far, thus using it here eluded me. Once seeing it, it makes perfect sense. –  Chris Paynter Apr 26 '11 at 12:45

arrayPtr is a pointer and the pointer is passed by value to the parameter. AllocIntArray can modify its version of arrayPtr but the changes won't be seen by main().

(Edit: if you're using C++) modifying the signature for AllocIntArray to change the type of arrayPtr to a reference ought to fix your problem.

void AllocIntArray(int *&arrayPtr, int numElements)
share|improve this answer
    
WTF is *&? You better not be trying to corrupt my beautiful C language with your C++ shenanigans :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 26 '11 at 12:46
    
Ahh... sorry. Tag my answer 'c++'. –  Jim Blackler Apr 26 '11 at 12:46

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