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What is the difference between if (!x) and if (x == null); that is, when can their results be different?

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4  
I love this article. Did you know that both 'a' == false and 'a' == true are false =) Yeah. Go figure. –  Rudie May 2 '11 at 23:52
    
@Rudie: An apple is not an orange and an apple is not a banana. What's wrong with that? –  Bergi Jan 18 at 15:56
    
@Bergi Nothing. But did you know that both 'a' == false and 'a' == true are false. Or do you want to talk about fruit some more? –  Rudie Jan 18 at 16:29
    
@Rudie: Yes, I knew and it makes only sense? –  Bergi Jan 19 at 17:22
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5 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

!x will return true for every "falsy" value (empty string, 0, null, false, undefined, NaN) whereas x == null will only return true if x is null (edit: or apparently undefined (see below)).

Try with x = 0, there is a difference.

You can say that the NOT operator ! converts a value into its opposite boolean equivalent. This is different than actually comparing two values.

In addition, if you compare values with ==, JavaScript does type conversion which can lead to unexpected behavior (like undefined == null). It is better to always use strict comparison === (value and type must be the same) and make use of type conversion only if you really know what you are doing.

Something to read:


Update:

For more information about the non-strict comparison of null and undefined (or the comparison in general), it is worth having a look at the specification. The comparison algorithm is defined there (the comparison is x == y):

  1. If Type(x) is the same as Type(y), then
    (...)
  2. If x is null and y is undefined, return true.
  3. If x is undefined and y is null, return true.
  4. (...)

(...)

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5  
"undefined == null" returns true, too. which is why you better use "x === null". –  fforw Apr 26 '11 at 13:41
    
@justkt, @fforw: Thanks, updated my answer. –  Felix Kling Apr 26 '11 at 13:45
    
@downvoter: Please explain so that I can correct/improve my answer. What is wrong? –  Felix Kling Jul 7 '11 at 8:14
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The results can be different if x is false, NaN, '' (empty string), undefined (using the strict comparison operator ===), or 0 (zero).

See Felix Kling's answer for an excellent summary of type comparison.

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undefined type coerces to null, so (x == null) is true for undefined, though (x === null) is not. –  justkt Apr 26 '11 at 13:48
    
Yes good catch @justkt, I shall update answer for future reference. –  Wesley Murch Apr 26 '11 at 13:49
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Say x is a string.

x = undefined;
if(!x) {
   alert("X is not a truthy value");
}
if(x == null) {
   alert("X is null");
}

x = "";
if(!x) {
   alert("X is not a truthy value");
}
if(x == null) {
   alert("X is null");
}

x = null;
if(!x) {
   alert("X is not a truthy value");
}
if(x == null) {
   alert("X is null");
}

You'll notice that "X is not a truthy value" is shown in all three cases, but only in the case of X being undefined or null is "X is null" shown.

When X is a boolean value, then (!x) will be true when X is false but (x == null) will not be. For numbers 0 and NaN are considered false values, so not X is truthy.

See it in action, including the difference between == (equality using type conversion) and === (strict equality)

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!x tests for a false value. This will be true for any value that can propagate to false for whatever reason. This will be true for permutations of false, 0, etc etc.

x == null is different because var x = 0 will NOT be null... but WILL be false.

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if (!x) 

coerces x uses the internal ToBoolean function

if (x==null)

coerces both operands using the internal ToPrimitive function (which generally resolves each side to a number, occasionally a string, depending on the operands)

For full explanantion of ToBoolean vs ToPrimitive see http://javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2011/02/07/truth-equality-and-javascript/

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