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I have a query that looks like this

SELECT TOP 1000 C.iId_company
FROM dbo.Company AS C WITH(NOLOCK)
WHERE 
C.col_1 LIKE 'something%'
OR C.col_1 LIKE 'something2%'
OR C.col_1 LIKE 'something3%'
OR C.col_2 LIKE 'something%'
OR C.col_2 LIKE 'something2%'
OR C.col_2 LIKE 'something3%'

I tried to make that query faster, and I tried adding indexes on col_1 and col_2. If I comment out the conditions concerning col_2, the query is extra-fast, same thing for col_1 (if I comment out conditions about col_1). But when I leave it like that, it's same old story, very slow.

What I suspect from looking at the execution plan, it's that only one index is used at a time and SQL performs a scan of the subset after the first index is used. I tried different things (making an index of both columns, but does not work also)

Actually my only solution would be to split the query and use a UNION. Is there a way to make that kind of query faster and keep it in one query ?

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What if you try the OPTION (FORCESEEK) hint? Does that do an index union then? –  Martin Smith Apr 26 '11 at 15:02
    
@Martin Couldn't you just create an index over both columns in this case? –  rsbarro Apr 26 '11 at 15:06
    
@rsbarro. If they create a composite index col1,col2 or col2,col1 then it is only going to be able to be seeked for col_1 LIKE 'something%' or col_2 LIKE 'something%' respectively. It will still need to scan the whole index to determine the other OR-ed criteria. –  Martin Smith Apr 26 '11 at 15:09
    
@Martin I see. I guess a composite index would help if they were AND-ed together, right? –  rsbarro Apr 26 '11 at 15:33
    
@rsbarro I think you're right, using a AND would bring up the usage a composite index since the query would match the composition of the index and then seek throught it. –  MaxiWheat Apr 26 '11 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a union. That is:

SELECT TOP 1000 C.iId_company
FROM dbo.Company AS C WITH(NOLOCK)
WHERE 
C.col_1 LIKE 'something%'
OR C.col_1 LIKE 'something2%'
OR C.col_1 LIKE 'something3%'

union all 

SELECT TOP 1000 C.iId_company
FROM dbo.Company AS C WITH(NOLOCK)
WHERE 
C.col_2 LIKE 'something%'
OR C.col_2 LIKE 'something2%'
OR C.col_2 LIKE 'something3%'

Adjust as necessary (e.g. you may need to wrap that whole thing in a select so that you can add an order by clause to get whatever you consider to be the top 1000). But I think you'll be happy with this solution.

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Using a UNION ALL to attach the two result sets could produce duplicate rows, so the expression that ultimately selects from this union will either need to issue a SELECT DISTINCT, or the query above could use a UNION and incur the sort at that level. –  Fred Sobotka Apr 26 '11 at 16:20
    
That is what I was trying to avoid. I was already able to produce that query. (Last line in my question) –  MaxiWheat Apr 26 '11 at 17:46
    
@Fred: you're right. I figure getting the top 1000 from the set is going to be slightly more efficient doing the distinct in selecting from the union all rather than doing the distinct within the union. –  Ben Thul Apr 26 '11 at 18:06
    
@MaxiWheat: That's how you get it to use multiple indexes. Ask yourself whether performance or maintainability is more important to you. –  Ben Thul Apr 26 '11 at 18:08

Your requirements point out a need for two separate indexes, one on each column you're searching. Use whatever DBA tool you prefer to generate and view the explain plan for the query. Now you can start re-working the query to see if the explain plan looks any better than your previous attempts. You may need to use a UNION or a common table expression to combine the two queries together into a single result set.

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