Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to move the unique_ptr's stored in an unsorted vector of them to another vector, that will contain the sorted vector of pointers.

Surely moving a unique_ptr will not automatically erase the element in the first vector? How can I do this?

Example of what I want to do:

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<T> > unsorted, sorted;
// fill the "unsorted" vector
while( unsorted.size() > 0 )
{
    const auto it = find_next_element_to_add_to_sorted(unsorted);
    sorted.push_back( std::move(*it) );
}

I hope the intent is clear.

UPDATE: my algorithm does not allow sorting in-place. If anyone is feeling nice today (I am not asking, see above for my question), feel free to implement it for this situation and show me. I really need the "sort by move". And I don't really see why the moving would be that much more expensive.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your code looks basically correct to me, except that it seems like you intend for the moved-from unique_ptr to be erased from the unsorted vector:

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<T> > unsorted, sorted;
// fill the "unsorted" vector
while( unsorted.size() > 0 )
{
    const auto it = find_next_element_to_add_to_sorted(unsorted);
    sorted.push_back( std::move(*it) );
    unsorted.erase(it);
}

After the move it refers to a moved-from unique_ptr and *it == nullptr. It still exists in unsorted and if that is not desired, must be explicitly erased.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! What is the "content" of it after the move? You solution seems nice and clean, and exactly what I'm looking for, but I'm confused about it after the move operation. (completely offtopic: can't wait for libc++ to be functional on Windows!) –  rubenvb Apr 26 '11 at 16:05
    
It appeared to me that it is an iterator into vector because of the way you are using it. If so, it refers to a unique_ptr. After the move, that unique_ptr will be equal to nullptr. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 26 '11 at 16:08
    
Yes, ok. I didn't know about that. –  rubenvb Apr 26 '11 at 16:21
    
This appears like it would do the trick, although the algorithm outlined in the OP code doesn't seem the same as the algorithm in the linked article. –  Mark B Apr 26 '11 at 16:22
    
Mark B: I didn't write the algorithm here, as it is irrelevant for what I'm trying to do here. The example code I gave would be part of the algorithm (in the link's last code block, the push_back and erase in this answer would replace the last two lines (the append and remove calls)) –  rubenvb Apr 26 '11 at 17:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.