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I have an int[2] representation of a long int in a 32 bit machine and want to convert it to long on 64bit machine. is there a safe architecture independent way of doing this conversion?

The source machine is 32bit and an int is 32bits. Destination machine is 64bit and the long long type is definitely 64bits.

can I do the following?

long i;
int j[2];
#ifdef LITTLEENDIAN
j[1] = *(int*)(&i);
j[0] = *(((int*)(&i))+1)
#else
j[0] = *(int*)(&i);
j[1] = *(((int*)(&i))+1)
#endif

If the above is incorrect, then what is the best and safest way for this? I am sure this would have been asked previously, but I didn't find a clean answer.

Thanks

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2  
It depends what you mean by "an int[2] representation of a long int". How did you create that representation? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 26 '11 at 15:34
1  
Endianness isn't the only issue: sizeof(int) just might equal sizeof(long) for a particular compiler on a particular machine. In that case, your code should do nothing. –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 26 '11 at 15:36
    
For example on 64bit Windows, long is 32 bits. –  Steve Jessop Apr 26 '11 at 15:38
    
@Steve: For any type T, sizeof(T) depends on the compiler, not the OS, so it's inaccurate to say "64bit Windows". You'd have to say something like "Microsoft Visual C++ compiler version X.Y under Windows 7 64-bit". –  Paul J. Lucas Apr 26 '11 at 15:41
1  
@Kiran: But now you're asking for a platform-independent solution to a platform-specific problem! In general, you should use int32_t and int64_t from <stdint.h> if you want platform-independent sized data-types. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 26 '11 at 15:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have an int[2] representation of a long int in a 32 bit machine and want to convert it to long on 64bit machine. is there a safe architecture independent way of doing this conversion?

Not really. Because apart from endianness, the sizes of the two datatypes may vary as well. On some popular platforms, int and long have the same size (both 32 bits)

Ultimately, it depends on how you created your int[2] representation. Whatever you did to create that int array has to be reversed in order to get a valid long out of it.

One approach which will work in practice (but is, technically speaking, undefined behavior), is to place both in a union:

union {
  int i2[2];
  long l;
} u;

Now you can simply write to u.i2 and read from u.l. The C++ standard technically doesn't allow this (it is undefined behavior), but it is such a common trick that major compilers explicitly support it anyway.

However, a better approach might be to use a char[] instead of int[], because char's are explicitly allowed to alias other types.

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Thanks, this works for me. The reason why I can't use int64 directly is due to the fact that input comes from 3rd party and I dont have control over it. –  Kiran Apr 26 '11 at 17:14

If you are sure of having 32-bit integer and 64-bit then you can use union concept.

union Convert
{
  long i;
  int j[2];
};
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