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I'm currently trying to solve problem 18 of project Euler. The goal is:

By starting at the top of the triangle below and moving to adjacent numbers on the row below, the maximum total from top to bottom is 23.

      3
     7 4
    2 4 6
   8 5 9 3

That is, 3 + 7 + 4 + 9 = 23.

Find the maximum total from top to bottom of the triangle below:

   
                 75
                95 64
               17 47 82
              18 35 87 10
             20 04 82 47 65
            19 01 23 75 03 34
           88 02 77 73 07 63 67
          99 65 04 28 06 16 70 92
         41 41 26 56 83 40 80 70 33
        41 48 72 33 47 32 37 16 94 29
       53 71 44 65 25 43 91 52 97 51 14
      70 11 33 28 77 73 17 78 39 68 17 57
     91 71 52 38 17 14 91 43 58 50 27 29 48
    63 66 04 68 89 53 67 30 73 16 69 87 40 31
   04 62 98 27 23 09 70 98 73 93 38 53 60 04 23

I tried to solve it with the following algorithm:

public static void main(String[] args) throws NumberFormatException, IOException {

        int[][] values = readFile();
        int depth = values.length - 2;

        while ( depth >= 0) {
            for (int j = 0; j < depth; j++) {
                values[depth][j] += Math.max( values[depth+1][j], values[depth+1][j+1]);
            }
            depth += -1;
        }

        values[0][0] += Math.max(values[1][0], values[1][1]);

            System.out.println("The maximum path sum is: " + values[0][0]);
    }

The array values contains all the numbers from the triangle where values[0][0] is the element in the top row and values[n][n] is the last element in the last row.

The algorithm uses the approach that if for example I start in the last row and have the choice between 04 + 63 and 62 + 63, the sum of the field in which 63 was will be set to 125 because this is the highest amount. This algorithm works for the small triangle, but for the big triangle it seems to fail. I'm not sure why and would appreciate every hint.

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2  
This is a really interesting problem. It seems that overall the sum may not be correct because decisions that would lead to a maximum point for any given step may not necessarily lead to the max sum overall. –  John Kane Apr 26 '11 at 15:42
    
For example: 75+95+47=217 (which would be the max sum for any given step) is less than 75+64+82=221 –  John Kane Apr 26 '11 at 15:45
    
I'm not an algorithm person, but for my own curiosity, would you need to visit every path possible and calculate its sum in order to solve this? –  user489041 Apr 26 '11 at 15:48
    
I don't think so, since there are also bigger triangles that can be solved in a reasonable time. That's why I tried this approach. –  anon Apr 26 '11 at 15:49
    
@user489041 You don't need to do that. And you should not do that. Roflcopters algorithm is the most common one for solving this Euler problem. –  Captain Giraffe Apr 26 '11 at 15:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe that the line:

for (int j = 0; j < depth; j++) {

should be

for (int j = 0; j <= depth; j++) {

because right now you aren't visiting the last element on each row. Of course, then you don't need the line

values[0][0] += Math.max(values[1][0], values[1][1]);

because it is already done in the loop.

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Eagle eyes. And the first triangle calculation (un)luckily does not fail because of this. –  Captain Giraffe Apr 26 '11 at 15:50
    
Thanks a lot, that solved the problem. Now the algorithm also works for the triangle mentioned in Project Euler. –  RoflcoptrException Apr 26 '11 at 15:58

I don't know the correct algorithm, but there's an easy proof of @Johns comment on the question, that the best local choice doesn't necessarily lead to the best global solution.

Consider this (extreme) example:

    1
   1 0
  1 0 1000
 1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0

Given your algorithm, you'd obviously go down the very left of the path and never read the 1000 that must be on the best path.

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This isn't what the OP is doing at all. The OP's algorithm is a dynamic programming one that essentially works from the bottom up finding the largest path to each point in a row given the largest path to each point in the row below it. Since each value in the bottom row is already the largest to reach that point when starting from the bottom, the DP algorithm works splendidly and correctly. –  Justin Peel Apr 26 '11 at 16:44
    
@Justin Peel: yes, I misread the post and thought he's using a different algorithm. My post still stands as a demonstration of what @John commented. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 26 '11 at 16:46

This may not be the best solution, but what if for each iteration you kept track of the sum to that point. Then when you go to the last row the max value would be your answer.

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That's exactly what Roflcoptr is doing. –  Captain Giraffe Apr 26 '11 at 15:52
    
Nice, I had not heard of this before but it seems like it makes the most sense. –  John Kane Apr 26 '11 at 15:54