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So I simply want to find all the divisors of a given number (excepting the number itself). Currently, I have this:

public static List<int> proper_divisors(int x)
{
    List<int> toreturn = new List<int>();
    toreturn.Add(1);
    int i = 0;
    int j=1;
    int z = 0;
    while (primes.ElementAt(i) < Math.Sqrt(x))
    {
        if (x % primes.ElementAt(i) == 0)
        {
            toreturn.Add(primes.ElementAt(i));
            toreturn.Add(x / primes.ElementAt(i));
            j = 2;
            z = (int)Math.Pow(primes.ElementAt(i), 2);
            while (z < x)
            {
                if (x % z == 0)
                {
                    toreturn.Add(z);
                    toreturn.Add(x / z);
                    j++;
                    z = (int)Math.Pow(primes.ElementAt(i), j);
                }
                else
                {
                    z = x;
                }
            }
        }
        i++;
    }
    toreturn = toreturn.Distinct().ToList<int>();
    return toreturn;
}

where primes is a list of primes (assume it is correct, and is large enough). The algorithm works in the sense that it finds all the prime factors, but not all the factors (i.e. given 34534, it returns {1,2,17267,31,1114} but misses {62, 557} as 62 is a combination, and therefore misses 557 as well.

I have also tried just getting the prime factors of a number, but I don't know how to convert that into a list of all of the correct combinations.

The code for that algorithm is as follows:

public static List<int> prime_factors(int x)
{
    List<int> toreturn = new List<int>();
    int i = 0;
    while (primes.ElementAt(i) <= x)
    {
        if (x % primes.ElementAt(i) == 0)
        {
            toreturn.Add(primes.ElementAt(i));
            x = x / primes.ElementAt(i);
        }
        else
        {
            i++;
        }
    }
    return toreturn;
}

Any ideas on how to fix the first one, or how to create the list of combinations from the second one (I would prefer that as it would be faster)?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you already have a list of the prime factors, what you want to do is to compute the powerset of that list.

Now one problem is that you might have duplicates in the list (e.g. the prime factors of 20 = 2 * 2 * 5) and sets don't allow duplicates. So we can make each element of the list unique by projecting it to a structure of the form {x, y} where x is the prime and y is the index of the prime in the list.

var var all_primes = primes.Select((x, y) => new { x, y }).ToList();

Now all_primes is a list of the form {x, y} where x is the prime and y is the index in the list.

Then we compute the power set.

var power_set_primes = GetPowerSet(all_primes);

So power_set_primes is an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> where T is the anonymous type {x, y} where x and y are of type int.

So next we compute the product of the each element in the power set

foreach (var p in power_set_primes)
{
    var factor = p.Select(x => x.x).Aggregate(1, (x, y) => x * y);
    factors.Add(factor);
}

Putting it all together:

var all_primes = primes.Select((x, y) => new { x, y }).ToList(); //assuming that primes contains duplicates.
var power_set_primes = GetPowerSet(all_primes);
var factors = new HashSet<int>();

foreach (var p in power_set_primes)
{
    var factor = p.Select(x => x.x).Aggregate(1, (x, y) => x * y);
    factors.Add(factor);
}

From http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Power_Set for implementations of powerset.

public IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> GetPowerSet<T>(List<T> list)
{
    return from m in Enumerable.Range(0, 1 << list.Count)
           select
               from i in Enumerable.Range(0, list.Count)
               where (m & (1 << i)) != 0
               select list[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I dont follow. Factors is the list of prime factors that I found? And since what I want is all combinations of the factors that multiply to less than or equal to to the number, there has to be a better way. –  soandos Apr 26 '11 at 16:48
    
Opps, that shouldn't be Math.Floor... editing... –  Rodrick Chapman Apr 26 '11 at 16:52
    
this does not really work though. currently, if a prime goes in more than itself times, this will not give the correct factors (this happens a lot, i.e. every time 9 is a factor...) –  soandos Apr 26 '11 at 16:59
    
I dont need that... the fact that there are multiple copies of the prime in the returned list is more than enough, since i will need to get all the combinations whose product is less that the number anyway –  soandos Apr 26 '11 at 17:16
    
Ah, I see what you mean. You'll need to get the Cartesian product as mentioned in another comment then... –  Rodrick Chapman Apr 26 '11 at 17:22

There has been a similar question before, which has an interesting solution using IEnumerable. If you want all the divisors and not the factors, and assuming you are using at least C# 3.0 you could use something like this:

static IEnumerable<int> GetDivisors(int n)
{
    return from a in Enumerable.Range(2, n / 2)
           where n % a == 0
           select a;                      
}

and then use it like this:

foreach(var divisor in GetDivisors(10))
    Console.WriteLine(divisor);

or, if you want a List, just:

List<int> divisors = GetDivisors(10).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
again, that is a nice way of doing it brute force. but given that i have a list of the necessary primes, there is no reason to do it that way. –  soandos Apr 26 '11 at 16:46
    
So, if you have all the prime factors of the number and just want all the combinations among them why not using a cartesian product, sort of: from x in primes from y in primes where x != y select x * y? This could solve your issue, provided that you have 1 in your prime numbers (otherwise a .Concat(primes) would solve that) –  LazyOfT Apr 26 '11 at 16:59
    
How do i do that? –  soandos Apr 26 '11 at 17:00
    
but the number of factors that I have to multiply is unknown. it could be three or more... –  soandos Apr 26 '11 at 17:03
1  
I see your point. What you are asking is a method for having all the possible combinations of prime factors that you already have. This could be solved by means of some combinatorial algorithm which, in my opinion, is not that simple to implement properly. Besides that, you risk to end up with a solution that, while trying to optimize the speed, risks to be less performant than a simpler approach, and far less readable. Perhaps you might want to consider writing a readable solution first, and then trying to optimize it if its performance is not acceptable for the given task. –  LazyOfT Apr 26 '11 at 17:34

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