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What is the differences between these three blocks in terms of side-effects when $world is a list of elements? I am seeing a different behaviour between the first and the third and cannot get my head around it.

<xsl:variable name="hello" select="$world" />

<xsl:variable name="hello">
    <xsl:value-of select="$world" />
</xsl:variable>

<xsl:variable name="hello">
    <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="$something=true()">
            <xsl:value-of select="$world" />
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:value-of select="$world" />
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:variable>

Edit 1: I want to process $hello in a <xsl:for-each select="$hello">. With the third block above the <xsl:for-each> has only one item to process that contains the joined contents of $world. Why is that?

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Side effect has a special connotation in declarative paradigm... Rephrasing title. –  user357812 Apr 26 '11 at 17:08
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a detailed explanation of your problem and an example of complete XSLT 1.0 solution. –  Dimitre Novatchev Apr 27 '11 at 3:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first xsl:variable will have the same value and type as $world. The second is a result tree fragment with a single text node of the string value of $world. The third is also a result tree fragment with a single text node.

I guess you want either

  <xsl:variable name="hello" select="if (condition) then $world else $foo"/>

in XSLT 2.0 and then your for-each select="$hello" would work as you want or in XSLT 1.0 plus EXSLT common you want

<xsl:variable name="hello">
  <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="condition">
      <xsl:copy-of select="$world"/>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
      <xsl:copy-of select="$foo"/>
    </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
</xsl:variable>

<xsl:for-each select="exsl:node-set($hello)/*">...</xsl:for-each>
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Thank you, Martin. Can I conclude that there is no way to get what I want in XSLT 1.0 without EXSLT? –  fawick Apr 26 '11 at 17:06
    
@Martin Honnen: "a single text node of the string value of" [ first node in ] "$world." [ node-set ]. –  user357812 Apr 26 '11 at 17:14
    
@Fabian Wickborn: Declaring a variable with one or another node set is a FAQ: <xsl:variable name="hello" select="$world[$something]|$moon[not($something)]"/> –  user357812 Apr 26 '11 at 17:17
    
You haven't provided much details. It might be that e.g. <xsl:variable name="hello" select="$world[foo = 'bar']"/> does what you want, meaning an XPath filter predicate applied to your original variable is sufficient. But it depends on the kind of condition you want to check and how it relates to the nodes. There are certainly things were XSLT without exsl:node-set can't achieve the goal in a single transformation step. –  Martin Honnen Apr 26 '11 at 17:17
    
Alejandro, Fabian said "contains the joined contents of $world" so there could be a chance that he uses XSLT 2.0 that's why I was intentionally not precise on that issue. –  Martin Honnen Apr 26 '11 at 17:22

While all three examples are valid in both XSLT 1.0 and XSLT 2.0, the way the semantics are described is very different in the two specs; also when $value contains multiple nodes, the effect of <xsl:value-of select="$value"/> depends on whether the stylesheet specifies version="1.0" or version="2.0".

The main things to remember, that apply to both versions, are (a) xsl:value-of creates a text node by converting whatever it selects into a string, and (b) xsl:variable with contained instructions (and no "as" attribute) creates a new tree rooted at a document node.

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  <xsl:variable name="hello">
      <xsl:choose>
          <xsl:when test="$something=true()">
              <xsl:value-of select="$world" />
          </xsl:when>
          <xsl:otherwise>
              <xsl:value-of select="$world" />
          </xsl:otherwise>            
         </xsl:choose>        
    </xsl:variable>

I want to process $hello in a <xsl:for-each select="$hello">. With the block above the <xsl:for-each> has only one item to process that contains the joined contents of $world. Why is that?

The variable named $hello contains the string value of $world. This is by definition how <xsl:value-of> behaves in XSLT 1.0.

You haven't shown us how $world is defined, but if it contains a single element or a whole document tree, then (again) by definition, its string value is the concatenation (in document order) of all of its descendents - text nodes.

This is exactly what you are seeing.

The situation will be different if insead of:

<xsl:value-of select="$world" />

you use:

<xsl:copy-of select="$world" />

This copies the whole subtree whose root is the element (or root node / in the case when $world contains a complete document) contained in $world.

However, in XSLT 1.0 this creates the so called RTF (Result Tree Fragment) and by definition one cannot use an RTF as a location step in XPath (1.0) expression.

One must first convert this to a regular tree (document node) using a vendor-supplied extension function that most often has the local-name node-set but is in a vendor-specific namespace.

A typical example is:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:ext="http://exslt.org/common"
 >
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vWorld" select="/*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:variable name="vrtfHello">
    <xsl:copy-of select="$vWorld"/>
  </xsl:variable>

  <xsl:variable name="vHello" select=
   "ext:node-set($vrtfHello)/*"/>

  <xsl:copy-of select="$vHello/*[3]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<nums>
  <num>01</num>
  <num>02</num>
  <num>03</num>
  <num>04</num>
  <num>05</num>
  <num>06</num>
  <num>07</num>
  <num>08</num>
  <num>09</num>
  <num>10</num>
</nums>

the result is (as expected):

<num>03</num>

Here we use the ext:node-set() extension function in the namespace "http://exslt.org/common" as specified by the EXSLT vendor-independent library. Most XSLT 1.0 processors support EXSLT and using its node-set() extension function doesn't decrease the degree of portability of an XSLT application accross all such XSLT processors.

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