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I am doing some transformations on a tab-separated file wherein one column contains a heirarchical identifier like this:

VI.d5.5
VII.b2.1
VII.b2.2
VII.b2.3
VII.c1

I need to transform it to look like the following, inserting an up-cased letter from the second dot group between the first and second:

VI.D.d5.5
VII.B.b2.1
VII.B.b2.2
VII.B.b2.3
VII.C.c1

I know about the \U flag in sed but I don't know how to apply it only once. For example, the following up-cases both the inserted letter and the original lower-case: (undesired)

echo 'VII.b1.1' | sed -e 's/\([a-h]\)/\U\1.\1/'
VII.B.B1.1

I would welcome any shell (sed, awk, perl, whatever) or vim solution that would allow me to modify this column in place in the tab-separated file.

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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using \u instead of \U which turns the next character uppercase. But if you wanna use \U then you have to stop the uppercase with \E or \L do like

's/\([a-h]\)/\U\1\E.\1/'

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Thanks - I hadn't known about \u. –  Michael Berkowski Apr 26 '11 at 17:04
    
@Michael: \u and \U are nonstandard extensions to sed, although they are standard in Perl. Try running the sed version on my dataset given below. It doesn’t work right. –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 17:35
    
@tchrist: I will agree that it is a non-standard extension, however the OP said \U was "working" but not stopping on just one character, which implies he didn't know about \E or \u, but more importantly, implies that he does in fact have the proper extension for it installed. So if "portability" isn't an issue for him, then using \u or \U is fine. –  Crayon Violent Apr 26 '11 at 17:51
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have you tried \u instead of \U? According to the sed info page (info sed):

`\U'
     Turn the replacement to uppercase until a `\L' or `\E' is found,

`\u'
     Turn the next character to uppercase,
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There is no such thing in standard sed. –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 17:02
    
I can't find a \U in "standard sed" either, but, seeing as the author of the question is attempting to use it, I'm going to assume that they are using GNU sed, which does, indeed have \u –  photoionized Apr 26 '11 at 17:06
    
@photoionized: I went and found a Linux system with ɢɴᴜ sed installed on it, but couldn’t get it to behave right on my dataset. It kept not casemapping one of my letters in the second dataset I showed. –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 17:38
    
@tchrist: I'm not exactly sure which dataset you are referring to. The sed on the box I'm using right now seems to handle both the utf8 and the standard latin characters just fine. I looked at the GNU source and it looks like the \u option may have been added in sed >= 4.0, which should be pretty much all Linux OS systems post 2000. Could it be you have some legacy version of the utility? –  photoionized Apr 26 '11 at 17:55
    
@photoionized: The problem is that while \u was able to change the lowercase “ç” and “ð” just fine, it completely ignores “ß”. That tells me it can only do what Unicode calls simple casemapping, not full casemapping. I have no idea why it would be restricted like that; probably somebody just didn’t know better. This is under “GNU sed version 4.2.1”. Is there a newer version I should be using? –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 18:01
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sed -e 's/\.[a-z]/\U&\E&/'

Perl works well too:

perl -pe 's/\.[a-z]/uc($&) . $&/e'
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You don’t actually need s///e in perl, because it borrowed the casemapping escapes right out of vi in the first place. So perl -pe 's/\.[a-z]/\U$&\E$&/' works just the same way. BTW, ff you are going to match real letters like that way, a better way to do than than enumerating the set [a-z] is to use the \pL shortcut (it’s an alias for \p{Letter}), which matches any character with the Letter property. There are also fancier properties like \p{Lower}, \p{Cased}. and even \p{Changes_When_Uppercased} if you really want them. Depends what you’re really trying to say. –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 17:39
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You can’t do that in standard sed(1), because there is no such thing as \u or \U there. Indeed, on all my systems (but one) it fails — and silently, too, alas! I tried the sed version both on my Mac laptop and my Mac desktop, and then I tried it on our Solaris server and on our OpenBSD server. I tried it on the lone AIX box too, and of course it didn’t work there. :(

However, you should be able to do it portably this way, which works on those systems I tested:

% cat sample
VI.d5.5                                                                           
VII.b2.1
VII.b2.2
VII.b2.3
VII.c1

% perl -wpe 's/([^.]+)\.(.)/$1.\u$2.$2/' /tmp/sample 
VI.D.d5.5
VII.B.b2.1
VII.B.b2.2
VII.B.b2.3
VII.C.c1

Not only is that more portable, it’s a lot easier, too.

That should work on any version of Perl released in the last 20 years, including perl4. However, if you’re living on the bleeding edge and so have at least 5.10 installed, then you can do it in this way instead:

% perl -M5.10.0 -wpe 's/[^.]+\.\K(?=(.))/\u$1./' /tmp/sample
VI.D.d5.5
VII.B.b2.1
VII.B.b2.2
VII.B.b2.3
VII.C.c1

That ‑M5.10.0 is just to make sure you really have the 5.10 feature-set available and loaded.

What about Unicode?

Now suppose that your sample data had Unicode in it:

% cat /tmp/sample.utf8
Ⅵ.ð5.5
Ⅷ.ß2.3
Ⅺ.ç1

% uniquote /tmp/sample.utf8 
\N{U+2165}.\N{U+F0}5.5
\N{U+2167}.\N{U+DF}2.3
\N{U+216A}.\N{U+E7}1

% uniquote -v /tmp/sample.utf8
\N{ROMAN NUMERAL SIX}.\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH}5.5
\N{ROMAN NUMERAL EIGHT}.\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER SHARP S}2.3
\N{ROMAN NUMERAL ELEVEN}.\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER C WITH CEDILLA}1

I can guarantee you that you aren’t going to find a version of sed that does the right thing on that data. It will mess up. I went to our sacrificial Linux box, and although the ɢɴᴜsed they use there works on your sample data, it refused to casemap one of those characters in my fancier Unicode dataset, even when I had the locale all set up right. But the perl version still did the right thing.

But with perl, just add the ‑CSD command-line options to tell perl that the datafiles and std{in,out,err} are all in UTF‑8, then run the same commands and you will see something that’s really Qᴜɪᴛᴇ Iɴᴛᴇʀᴇsᴛɪɴɢ:

% perl -CSD -wpe 's/([^.]+)\.(.)/$1.\u$2.$2/' /tmp/sample.utf8
Ⅵ.Ð.ð5.5
Ⅷ.Ss.ß2.3
Ⅺ.Ç.ç1

% perl -CSD -wpe 's/[^.]+\.\K(?=(.))/\u$1./' /tmp/sample.utf8
Ⅵ.Ð.ð5.5
Ⅷ.Ss.ß2.3
Ⅺ.Ç.ç1

% perl -CSD -wpe 's/[^.]+\.\K(?=(.))/\U$1./' /tmp/sample.utf8
Ⅵ.Ð.ð5.5
Ⅷ.SS.ß2.3
Ⅺ.Ç.ç1

As you see, there is a difference between the titlecasing that \u does and the uppercasing that \U does. That’s because the lowercase letter “ß” is “Ss” in titlecase but “SS” in uppercase. Bizarre but true! This sort of thing admittedly happens a lot more with the Greek letters than it does with the Latin ones like we use, but you still want to do it right.

Here that is all uniquoted so you can see just which code points we’re talking about:

% perl -CSD -wpe 's/[^.]+\.\K(?=(.))/\u$1./' /tmp/sample.utf8 | uniquote
\N{U+2165}.\N{U+D0}.\N{U+F0}5.5
\N{U+2167}.Ss.\N{U+DF}2.3
\N{U+216A}.\N{U+C7}.\N{U+E7}1

% perl -CSD -wpe 's/[^.]+\.\K(?=(.))/\u$1./' /tmp/sample.utf8 | uniquote -v
\N{ROMAN NUMERAL SIX}.\N{LATIN CAPITAL LETTER ETH}.\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH}5.5
\N{ROMAN NUMERAL EIGHT}.Ss.\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER SHARP S}2.3
\N{ROMAN NUMERAL ELEVEN}.\N{LATIN CAPITAL LETTER C WITH CEDILLA}.\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER C WITH CEDILLA}1

Isn’t that way cool?

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Thanks for your detailed analysis. For me this is a one-off data transformation and definitely contains no unicode, but this is useful information. –  Michael Berkowski Apr 26 '11 at 17:44
    
@Michael: Sure thing. Use whatever is at hand. I just wanted to give you a few more alternatives so you can could back and look at this later sometime if you ever need a more flexible solution. I tried the sed on both my Mac laptop and desktop machines, plus on our ʙsᴅ server, but none of those had the fancy ɢɴᴜ version, though both came with perl standardly. I found a Linux system that did have ɢɴᴜsed, but discovered that Linux has a pretty naïve notion Unicode. Vendor locales are just so dodgy, you know? Never know what they’ll do to you. –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 17:44
    
+1 for extra info to digest but kinda OT to the actual issue at hand. OT meaning it doesn't follow the GIGO rule of trouble-shooting. You'll run yourself crazy trying to consider "what if" situations that go beyond what OP posts ;) –  Crayon Violent Apr 26 '11 at 17:55
    
@Crayon I just started with a simple perl one-liner because I couldn’t get his sed version to work on any of the systems I could get at easily — which was like 5 of them, not one of which had ɢɴᴜsed on them! Then I started diddling and ended up with a bad case of logorrhea. I had it when that happens. :) –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 18:05
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sed -e 's/\([^.]\+\)\.\(.\)/\1.\u\2\.\2/'

like this:

$ sed -e 's/\([^.]\+\)\.\(.\)/\1.\u\2\.\2/' <<<'VI.d5.5'
VI.D.d5.5
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That doesn’t work. echo 'VI.d5.5' | sed -e 's/\([^.]\+\)\.\(.\)/\1.\u\2\.\2/' produces 'VI.d5.5'. However, echo 'VI.d5.5' | perl -pe 's/([^.]+)\.(.)/$1.\u$2\.$2/' produces 'VI.D.d5.5'. –  tchrist Apr 26 '11 at 17:01
    
Probably different sed, my example is copied from the shell. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Apr 26 '11 at 18:46
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Here's an awk solution. No messy regular expressions needed. Basic idea: Split on dot, get the first character of 2nd field. Then change its case using toupper() function. Lastly, substitute back to 2nd field.

awk -F"." '{
    ch = toupper(substr($2,1,1))
    $2=ch"."$2
}1' OFS="." file
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