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I am putting a bit of SQL into an Oracle script, if I run the Vanilla SQL i get the correct output of one single returned value/record. However in my custom function I get the value I am looking for returned as many times as there are records. Here is an example of what I have.

create function EXAMPLE_FUNCTION (passedID in NUMBER)
return NUMBER
IS 
returnValue NUMBER;
BEGIN
SELECT "TABLE1"."ID" INTO returnValue
FROM "TABLE1" WHERE "TABLE1"."ID" = passedID;
RETURN  returnValue;
END;

So if TABLE1 has 20 records I will get the record with ID 1 returned 20 times, I am not sure where its going wrong, but I'm sure its simple!

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Can you further clarify what you are wanting to do? What result are you expecting? How are you calling this function? –  Craig Apr 26 '11 at 17:23
    
If you're getting 20 return values, you must be calling the function 20 times. Show us how you are calling it. –  Dave Costa Apr 26 '11 at 17:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are probably calling the function like this:

select EXAMPLE_FUNCTION (1)
from my_table

Call it without the from:

select EXAMPLE_FUNCTION (1)

EDIT:

As pointed by Shannon Oracle requires the from clause so I searched and found examples using the dual table:

select EXAMPLE_FUNCTION (1)
from dual
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This makes lots of sense, however without the from I get "ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected" –  beck Apr 26 '11 at 18:21
    
-1 Oracle always requires a from clause for a select statement. –  Shannon Severance Apr 26 '11 at 18:26
    
Edited with a hint from searches –  Clodoaldo Neto Apr 26 '11 at 18:39
    
Thanks guys, need to read up on dual! –  beck Apr 26 '11 at 18:39
    
Per edit, removed down vote. @Beck: About the dual table see download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e17118/… –  Shannon Severance Apr 26 '11 at 21:49

Just do something like: SELECT EXAMPLE_FUNCTION(1) FROM dual;

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Would something like the below work in your function?

Select COUNT(*) into returnValue 
from TABLE1 
where Table1.ID = passedID;
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It runs but I get the same 'problem', I am fairly certain Kakao is right. –  beck Apr 26 '11 at 18:27
    
Oh, the way you call it you got 20 entries, not that the inside of the function has 20 return values. I didn't understand the question. This code would make the function easier to understand, and Kakao's way of calling it will give you the answer once. –  thursdaysgeek Apr 26 '11 at 20:22

What value are you using for passedID? If you want to get soemthing different out for each row you need to pass something different in.

Compare these two function calls. First a fixed value:

SQL> select example_function(1) from table1
  2  /

EXAMPLE_FUNCTION(1)
-------------------
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1
                  1

20 rows selected.

SQL>

Then using the table column to supply the parameter:

SQL> select example_function(id) from table1
  2  /

EXAMPLE_FUNCTION(ID)
--------------------
                   1
                   2
                   3
                   4
                   5
                   6
                   7
                   8
                   9
                  10
                  11
                  12
                  13
                  14
                  15
                  16
                  17
                  18
                  19
                  20

20 rows selected.

SQL>
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