Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking at trying the following code:

var classA = function() {};
classA.prototype = { x: 4, y: 6 };
classA.prototype.prototype = { z: 10 };
var foo = new classA();
alert(foo.z);

Why does the alert come back as undefined? Shouldn't javascript follow the prototype chain to find z?

share|improve this question
    
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

By default an object prototype is an empty object.

classA.prototype = { x: 4, y: 6 };
classA.prototype.prototype = { z: 10 };

is equivalent to

classA.prototype = { x: 4, y: 6, prototype: { z: 10 }};

you just added a property named prototype to classA

z is a property of the object prototype belonging to classA

alert(foo.prototype.z); will work

share|improve this answer
add comment

The prototype property comes for free on all functions - in case the function is intended to be used as a constructor (it defines the prototype to be assigned to instances created by that constructor).

You are trying to assign a prototype property to a non-function - which is meaningless. In some browsers The prototype of an object can be get and set by the non standard proto attribute.

There is also a new ECMA standard API for accessing an object's prototype

Object.getPrototypeOf(obj)

but it is not yet supported by all browsers

Edit: just realized I am the author of Austin's link :-)

share|improve this answer
add comment

The prototype of an object is stored in __proto__. The prototype property on a class is actually the default prototype for its instances. I found this article to be very helpful.

If you change your code to use __proto__ for the prototype of the prototype, it will behave as you expected.

var classA = function() {};
classA.prototype = { x: 4, y: 6 };
classA.prototype.__proto__ = { z: 10 };
var foo = new classA();
alert(foo.z);
share|improve this answer
1  
Except that __proto__ is non-standard –  Justin Johnson Apr 26 '11 at 17:57
add comment

I don't believe that you can change the prototype of a prototype or if such a thing even exists. Do this instead

var classA = function() {};
classA.prototype = { x: 4, y: 6 };
classA.prototype.z = 10;
var foo = new classA();
alert(foo.z);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.