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I'm trying to find the fundamental frequency of a recorded sound using FFT in C. Would anyone know a open source implementation in C that I can modify and use?

Thanks!

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have you tried typing "C FFT" in google and clicking the first link? –  Mat Apr 26 '11 at 17:48
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

FFTW is probably what you are looking for.

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Indeed, thanks a lot! –  Valentin Radu Apr 26 '11 at 18:11
    
I'm concerned in that the page calls this a discrete fourier transform with arbitrary input size. The fast fourier transform algorithm only supports inputs of size 2^n. The name "fastest fourier transform" may be confusing, and not imply the FFT algorithm (except perhaps as an optimisation when applicable). –  Steve314 Apr 26 '11 at 18:11
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@Steve314 FFT's of arbitrary dimensions can be computed. The power-of-two case happens to be the fastest and the easiest to implement, but fast algorithms exist to compute Fourier Transforms for any input size. –  Thomas Oct 7 '13 at 23:30
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@Thomas - I had a long-standing belief that "fast fourier transform" was the name of a specific algorithm. Thanks for prompting me to check - I now see that what I called the FFT was actually the Cooley-Tukey algorithm and as you say, there are more FFT algorithms than that. –  Steve314 Oct 8 '13 at 2:22
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You will find here a C/C++ implementation, with a description of the source code (tutorial): http://drdobbs.com/cpp/199500857

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The question was for a C implementation - this is a C++ implementation using template metaprogramming. That said, listing one does give an FFT, taken from Numerical Recipes in C++, which is pretty close to being C (the "swap" calls don't exist in the C library IIRC, but that's easily fixed). –  Steve314 Apr 26 '11 at 18:08
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Another worth considering is D.J. Bernstein's. It's somewhat on the complex side (as is FFTW) but faster than most (including FFTW) in most tests.

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This lib you can find an implementation ImLib3D

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