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I have text in a file that looks like this:

text1 5,000 6,000
text2 2,000 3,000
text3 
           5,000 3,000
text4 1,000 2000
text5
          7,000 1,000
text6 2,000 1,000

Is there any way to clean this up in Python so that if there are missing numbers after a text line, the numbers on the subsequent line can be placed on the line above:

text1 5,000 6,000
text2 2,000 3,000
text3 5,000 3,000
text4 1,000 2000
text5 7,000 1,000
text6 2,000 1,000

Thanks!

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It's not a one-time problem and the spacing is not quite as neat as I've shown here. –  coderman Apr 26 '11 at 18:14
1  
how can you formally tell where a new line begins and where previous continues? Judging on whitespace prefix of the line? –  ulidtko Apr 26 '11 at 18:17
    
@ulidtko, yes, the whitespace indicates a new line. –  coderman Apr 26 '11 at 18:21
    
see my answer. –  ulidtko Apr 26 '11 at 18:22
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that logical lines "continue" on lines which start with whitespace (and contain arbitrary amount of records), you can use this:

>>> collapse_space = lambda s: str.join(" ", s.split())
>>>
>>> logical_lines = []
>>> for line in open("text"):
...   if line[0].isspace():
...     logical_lines[-1] += line #-- append the continuation to the last logical line
...   else:
...     logical_lines.append(line) #-- start a new logical line
... 
>>> l = map(collapse_space, logical_lines)
>>>
>>> print str.join("\n", l)
text1 5,000 6,000
text2 2,000 3,000
text3 5,000 3,000
text4 1,000 2000
text5 7,000 1,000
text6 2,000 1,000
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot. –  coderman Apr 26 '11 at 18:27
    
this may sound like a dumb question and you might ask why I would ever want to do this, but say I only wanted to append the line for text3 with its corresponding numbers and leave the line for text5 without its numbers. would I just add "if 'text3' in line" to the code? –  coderman Apr 26 '11 at 18:40
    
I think I got it. thanks again for the help. collapse_space = lambda s: str.join(" ", s.split()) logical_lines = [] data=open("test.txt").readlines() for i,line in enumerate(data): if 'text3' in data[i-1] and line[0].isspace(): logical_lines[-1] += line else: logical_lines.append(line) l = map(collapse_space, logical_lines) print str.join("\n", l) –  coderman Apr 26 '11 at 18:44
    
@coderman, I'd have no single doubt about it if I done some one-time transforming of the file (which means yes, pretty much ok to do so). But if you are writing reusable code, you'd better abstracted that bit a little higher; say, write a function which takes "text5" as parameter and skips it in the body appropriately. –  ulidtko Apr 26 '11 at 18:46
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Assuming there should be exactly three "words" on each line, you could use

tokens = (x for line in open("file") for x in line.split())
for t in zip(tokens, tokens, tokens):
    print str.join(" ", t)

Edit: Since apparently the above prerequisite does not hold, here is an implementation that actually looks at the data:

from itertools import groupby
tokens = (x for line in open("file") for x in line.split())
for key, it in groupby(tokens, lambda x: x[0].isdigit()):
    if key:
        print str.join(" ", it)
    else:
        print str.join("\n", it),
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Sven Marnach. Unfortunately, there will not always be 3 words on each line. –  coderman Apr 26 '11 at 18:11
2  
+1: I have just been rereading some PyCon presentations on generators and co-routines, and this answer made me smile. –  Peter Rowell Apr 26 '11 at 18:13
1  
Ouch, this is clever. –  delnan Apr 26 '11 at 18:15
2  
Smart use of zip on generators! –  ulidtko Apr 26 '11 at 18:15
    
Just curious why you use str.join(" ", it) instead of " ".join(it)? –  kevpie Apr 26 '11 at 18:56
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