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I want to create a sql query to split a single column value into multiple rows like:

SELECT ID, PRODUCT_COUNT FROM MERCHANT WHERE ID = 3050

ID          PRODUCT_COUNT
----------- -------------
3050        591

Based on this result, I want 6 rows as follows:

ID      RANGE    
3050    0-100
3050    101-200
3050    201-300
3050    301-400
3050    401-500
3050    501-591

How can I acheive this in a query ?

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So the numbers of rows are dynamic ... As per logic, i see it to be at an interval of 100 ... So thats the case, create a new table range, which will contain Min and Max .... Then Join this table with your result and get the desired output ... –  Nitin Midha Apr 26 '11 at 18:35

5 Answers 5

WITH cte AS (
  SELECT
    m.ID,
    PRODUCT_COUNT,
    LoBound = (v.number - 1) * 100 + 1,
    HiBound = v.number * 100
  FROM MERCHANT m
    INNER JOIN master..spt_values v
      ON v.type = 'P' AND v.number BETWEEN 1 AND (m.PRODUCT_COUNT - 1) / 100 + 1
  WHERE m.ID = 3050
)
SELECT
  ID,
  RANGE = CAST(CASE LoBound
                 WHEN 1 THEN 0
                 ELSE LoBound
               END AS varchar)
        + '-'
        + CAST(CASE
                 WHEN HiBound < PRODUCT_COUNT THEN HiBound
                 ELSE PRODUCT_COUNT
               END AS varchar)
FROM cte

The first CASE makes sure the first range starts with 0, not with 1, same as in your sample output.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great idea, but the OP wants the list to start with zero and end with the actual value instead of a number evenly divisable by 100. Also, you might want to check on the alias and the table path for spt_values. –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 19:13
    
@Jeff, thanks for the comment. As I'm looking at this answer of mine, I'm wondering how it hasn't been voted down till now. Maybe the kind people who were contemplating their downvotes somehow deduced that this answer was written at quite a late hour, my only excuse for posting this nonsense. Therefore, I must do something about it now... –  Andriy M May 8 '11 at 19:32
    
@Jeff: There. Thanks for your points, they've been attended to. However, the biggest problem was that my solution was posted unfinished, which, I hope, is now amended too. So thank you for not letting me leave that piece of gibberish behind. –  Andriy M May 8 '11 at 19:49
    
Your amended solution looks pretty much like mine does, now. Great minds think alike. ;-) If you want, test it against the sample #Merchant table I built along with my code. –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 19:58
1  
The code still has a couple of problems... misplace comma just before the first FROM and still has wrong alias on Product_Count-1. Between you and I, we'll get this yet. ;-) –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 21:41

Sorry... code removed. I made a mistake where if the Product_Count was evenly divisible by 100, it gave an incorrect final row.

UPDATE: Andriy's code is still correct. I was missing a "-1" in mine. I've repaired that and reposted both the test setup and my alternative solution.

Both Andriy's and my code produce the output in the correct order for this experiment, but I added an ORDER BY to guarantee it.

Here's the code for the test setup...

    --===== Conditionally drop and create a test table for
         -- everyone to work against.
         IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Merchant','U') IS NOT NULL
            DROP TABLE #Merchant
    ;
     SELECT TOP 10000
            ID            = IDENTITY(INT,1,1),
            Product_Count = ABS(CHECKSUM(NEWID()))%100000
       INTO #Merchant
       FROM sys.all_columns ac1
      CROSS JOIN sys.all_columns ac2
    ;
      ALTER TABLE #Merchant
        ADD PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (ID)
    ;
    --===== Make several entries where there's a known test setup.
     UPDATE #Merchant
        SET Product_Count = CASE
                                WHEN ID = 1 THEN 0
                                WHEN ID = 2 THEN 1
                                WHEN ID = 3 THEN 99
                                WHEN ID = 4 THEN 100
                                WHEN ID = 5 THEN 101
                                WHEN ID = 6 THEN 99999
                                WHEN ID = 7 THEN 100000
                                WHEN ID = 8 THEN 100001
                            END
  WHERE ID < = 8
 ;

Here's the alternative I posted before with the -1 correction.

WITH
cteCreateRanges AS
(--==== This determines what the ranges are
 SELECT m.ID,
        RangeStart = t.Number*100+SIGN(t.Number),
        RangeEnd   =(t.Number+1)*100,
        Product_Count
   FROM master.dbo.spt_Values t
  CROSS JOIN #Merchant        m
  WHERE t.Number BETWEEN 0 AND (m.Product_Count-1)/100
    AND t.Type = 'P'
    AND m.ID BETWEEN 1 AND 8 -- = @FindID -<<<---<<< Or use a single variable to find.
)--==== This makes the output "pretty" and sorts in correct order
 SELECT ID,
        [Range] = CAST(RangeStart AS VARCHAR(10)) + '-'
                + CASE
                  WHEN RangeEnd <= Product_Count
                  THEN CAST(RangeEnd AS VARCHAR(10))
                  ELSE CAST(Product_Count AS VARCHAR(10))
                  END
   FROM cteCreateRanges
  ORDER BY ID, RangeStart
;

Sorry about the earlier mistake. Thanks, Andriy, for catching it.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a suspicion that m.Product_Count/100 might not work well in all cases, but because of the closing citation I had to double check first before giving utterance to it. Now I can say with confidence: it does result in the incorrect output if Product_Count is a multiple of 100. (An extra row in the fashion of 101-100 is generated.) On the other point, I like the clever use of SIGN. If a similar idea came across my mind, I would most probably have used casting to bit instead. So far I can't say which is better, and I wouldn't like to guess. Not here. :) –  Andriy M May 8 '11 at 20:31
    
Confirmed. It doesn't work with something evenly divisible by 100. I'll take another crack at it. In the meantime, I've removed my bad code. Thanks for the catch, Andriy. –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 21:34

You could create a table like this (I am changing the first range to include 100 elements like the others to make it easier, and basing it at one, so that the indexes will match the total count):

CountRangeBoundary

MinIndexInRange
---------------
1
101
201
301
401
501
601
...

Then do a θ-join like this:

SELECT m.ID,
       crb.MinIndexInRange AS RANGE_MIN,
       MIN( crb.MinIndexInRange + 100, m.PRODUCT_COUNT) AS RANGE_MAX
FROM   MERCHANT m
       JOIN CountRangeBoundry crb ON crb.MinIndexInRange <= m.PRODUCT_COUNT
WHERE  m.ID = 3050
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your prompt reply. But here PRODUCT_COUNT value can be in hundred thousands so I cannot put these values in a table. I created a function that will generate ranges on run-time: /* SELECT * FROM [DBO].[SV2TABLE] (591, 100) */ ALTER FUNCTION [DBO].[SV2TABLE] (@COUNT INT,@DIV_BY INT) RETURNS @TABLE TABLE (RANGES VARCHAR(100), PREFIX INT) BEGIN DECLARE @CNT INT, @MAX INT SET @CNT=1 SET @MAX=@COUNT WHILE @CNT<=@MAX BEGIN INSERT INTO @TABLE SELECT CAST(@CNT AS VARCHAR) +'-' +CAST(@CNT +@DIV_BY -1 AS VARCHAR), @CNT SET @CNT = @CNT +@DIV_BY END RETURN END –  user725925 Apr 26 '11 at 19:16
2  
@user725925 - Why can't you put a few thousand rows in a table? It’s just one integer column. SQL Server can do this in its sleep, without breaking a sweat, with one arm tied around its back, and a lot of other clichés. And the query you are requesting will be producing several thousand rows, anyway! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 26 '11 at 19:53
    
I would agree that this is not a very good solution. On the other hand, this isn't really a very good problem. This doesn't look like a good use of a relational database management system. This looks more like a problem for a reporting system or a general application. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 26 '11 at 20:09

It looks like those ranges are a piece of data, so they should really be in a table (even if you don't expect them to change, because they will). That has the nice side benefit of making this task trivial:

CREATE TABLE My_Ranges (    -- Use a more descriptive name
    range_start    SMALLINT    NOT NULL,
    range_end      SMALLINT    NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_My_Ranges PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (range_start)
)
GO

SELECT
    P.id,
    R.range_start,
    CASE
        WHEN R.range_end < P.product_count THEN R.range_end
        ELSE P.product_count
    END AS range_end
FROM
    Products P
INNER JOIN My_Ranges R ON
    R.range_start <= P.product_count

If your ranges will always be contiguous then you can omit the range_end column. Your query will become a little more complex, but you won't have to worry about ranges overlapping or gaps in your ranges.

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So, what goes into the My_Ranges table? –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 19:10
    
And this is a "trivial" task even without the extra table. ;-) –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 19:56
    
My_Ranges contains any information about the ranges in question. The question doesn't go into specifics, but at the very least there's a start and end. If the ranges change down the road then he doesn't need to go into code to change what is really a data change. –  Tom H. May 9 '11 at 14:09
    
By the way, the fact that you had to correct your code multiple times and you have to use a CTE along with formulas a CASE statement and the SIGH trick belies the statement that it's already "trivial" :) –  Tom H. May 9 '11 at 14:14

You can try a recursive CTE.

WITH CTE AS
(
    SELECT Id, 0 MinB, 100 MaxB, [Range]
    FROM YourTable
    UNION ALL
    SELECT Id, CASE WHEN MinB = 0 THEN MinB+101 ELSE MinB+100 END, MaxB + 100, [Range]
    FROM CTE
    WHERE MinB < [Range]
)

SELECT  Id, 
        CAST(MinB AS VARCHAR) + ' - ' + CAST(CASE WHEN MaxB>[Range] THEN [Range] ELSE MaxB END AS VARCHAR) [Range]
FROM CTE
WHERE MinB < [Range]
ORDER BY Id, [Range]
OPTION(MAXRECURSION 5000)

I put a limit to the recursion level on 5000, but you can change it (or leave it at zero, that means basically to keep doing recursion until it can)

share|improve this answer
    
Using the OP's orginal information, you need to make [Range] start off as the Product_count to get this to work. Even then, the final sort isn't in proper numeric order. –  Jeff Moden May 8 '11 at 19:19

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