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I'm pretty sure Java lets you do this, I might be wrong though.

List<string> myList = new List<string>();
bool istrue = false;
myList.Add(istrue ? "something" : void);
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6 Answers 6

You can't use void like that. It's not an expression, it's a keyword used in method sigs. And the ?: operator requires all operands to be expressions. And I'm even surer that you can't do this in Java.

Why not an if statement? It makes it so much clearer what you're trying to do, precisely because void is meaningless in that context.

  1. Only add something if istrue, do nothing otherwise:

    List<string> myList = new List<string>();
    bool istrue = false;
    
    if (istrue)
    {
        myList.Add("something");
    }
    

    In one line:

    if (istrue) myList.Add("something");
    
  2. Add something if istrue, but add a null value otherwise:

    List<string> myList = new List<string>();
    bool istrue = false;
    
    if (istrue)
    {
        myList.Add("something");
    }
    else
    { 
        myList.Add(null);
    }
    

    In one line (null works with the ?: operator):

    myList.Add(istrue ? "something" : null);
    
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Not elegant. I'd be ok with: myList.Add("something") if isTrue; –  Matthew Apr 26 '11 at 18:59
5  
C# is not Python or Perl. –  BoltClock Apr 26 '11 at 19:00
1  
+1 for if statement: if(istrue) myList.Add("something"); // Clear and concise –  Mark Peters Apr 26 '11 at 19:01
    
@Matthew: You can always drop the braces and put everything on one line if you want, as Mark shows. –  BoltClock Apr 26 '11 at 19:22

void is only legal (1) as a return type of a method, or (2) as the underlying type of a pointer type. (thanks @Eric Lippert).

This code will not even compile.

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In order to fix this, use null instead of void. –  Kyle Uithoven Apr 26 '11 at 18:58
    
That wouldn't be the same behavior. The question isn't to add a string or null, it was to add or not add with an expression inside the call to Add. –  asawyer Apr 26 '11 at 19:00
    
@Kyle, that would actually add the value null. I want an "abort" option. –  Matthew Apr 26 '11 at 19:05
    
Inside that ternary you will not be able to abort. This would require two lines. –  Kyle Uithoven Apr 26 '11 at 19:08
2  
void is too a type. It is a type that is only legal (1) as a return type of a method, or (2) as the underlying type of a pointer type. Because of that, it's a pretty lousy type, I must say. But it is a type. Whether it is a type or not is irrelevant; in order to be used in a conditional expression it has to be an expression that is valid as an operand, and a type is not an expression valid as an operand of anything except "typeof". –  Eric Lippert Apr 26 '11 at 21:11

I'm glad this doesn't work. If I invoke .Add I expect something to be added. What if this type of logic was in a method you couldn't see?

myList.Add( aBlackBox.Method() );

Did it add or didn't it?!

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I don't understand, aBlackBox.Method() has a return type, doesn't it? You'd know if something were added based on that. –  Matthew Apr 26 '11 at 19:06
    
Unless the method called looked like "return istrue ? "something" : void" –  asawyer Apr 26 '11 at 19:31

I'm pretty sure that Java won't let you do that. The void keyword means that a method returns nothing. It's not the same as null, nor is it the same as an empty list, nor can you use it to mean "do nothing", which is what you seem to mean here.

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You might be right, it's been a while since I've used Java. Nevertheless, I wish there were a way to "abort" expressions. –  Matthew Apr 26 '11 at 19:07

void isn't the same as NULL,

try

List<string> myList = new List<string>();
bool istrue = false;
myList.Add(istrue ? "something" : null);
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You can

List<string> myList = new List<string>();
myList.Add(false ? "true" : "false");

Will add "false" to the list.

I'm guessing your code above is having a problem adding void as string.

Try

myList.Add(istrue ? "something" : string.empty);

EDIT If you're trying to only add when something is true then just do

if(isTrue)
   myList.Add("something");
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My goal is to actually not add something if isTrue evaluates as false. I wish void were an expression, basically. –  Matthew Apr 26 '11 at 19:01
    
I have updated my answer –  taylonr Apr 26 '11 at 19:09
    
null would add the value null to the list. I want an "abort". Doesn't exist in c# though (to my knowledge). –  Matthew Apr 26 '11 at 19:10

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