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I would like to animate the opacity value of a text string containing the name of the level in and out with a delay in the middle.

So the sequence of events would be like:

  1. Start transparent
  2. Fade in to solid white over a second of game time
  3. Wait a second
  4. Fade out to transparent again over a second.

The code I have written to animate the alpha value isn't working. Plus, it's pretty ugly and I'm sure there's a better way to do it using the XNA framework.

I've been unable to find any advice elsewhere about doing this. Surely animating values like this isn't that uncommon. How can I do it?

Here's my current code as requested (yes it's horrible).

private int fadeStringDirection = +1;
private int fadeStringDuration = 1000;
private float stringAlpha = 0;
private int stringRef = 0;
private int stringPhase = 1;

...

if (!pause)
{
    totalMillisecondsElapsed += gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.Milliseconds;
    if (fadestringDirection != 0)
    {
        stringAlpha = ((float)(totalMillisecondsElapsed - stringRef) / (float)(fadeStringDuration*stringPhase)) * fadeStringDirection;
        stringAlpha = MathHelper.Clamp(stringAlpha, 0, 1);
        if (topAlpha / 2 + 0.5 == fadeStringDirection)
        {
            fadeStringDirection = 0;
            stringRef = totalMillisecondsElapsed;
            stringPhase++;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        stringRef += gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.Milliseconds;
        if (stringRef >= fadeStringDuration * stringPhase)
        {
            stringPhase++;
            fadeStringDirection = -1;
            stringRef = totalMillisecondsElapsed;
        }
    }
}
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Posting a simplified version of your rendering code would be helpful. –  asawyer Apr 26 '11 at 20:20
1  
It's not that bad. ;) –  Jeff Mercado Apr 26 '11 at 20:44
    
+1 @Jeff Mercado. Just hide it away in a AbstractInterpolator/AbstractBouncer/whatever... class and find it neat when actually using it! –  jv42 Apr 27 '11 at 8:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's the solution I have now. Much nicer than what I had before (and in a class of its own).

/// <summary>
/// Animation helper class.
/// </summary>
public class Animation
{
    List<Keyframe> keyframes = new List<Keyframe>();

    int timeline;

    int lastFrame = 0;

    bool run = false;

    int currentIndex;

    /// <summary>
    /// Construct new animation helper.
    /// </summary>
    public Animation()
    {
    }

    public void AddKeyframe(int time, float value)
    {
        Keyframe k = new Keyframe();
        k.time = time;
        k.value = value;
        keyframes.Add(k);
        keyframes.Sort(delegate(Keyframe a, Keyframe b) { return a.time.CompareTo(b.time); });
        lastFrame = (time > lastFrame) ? time : lastFrame;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        timeline = 0;
        currentIndex = 0;
        run = true;
    }

    public void Update(GameTime gameTime, ref float value)
    {
        if (run)
        {
            timeline += gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.Milliseconds;
            value = MathHelper.SmoothStep(keyframes[currentIndex].value, keyframes[currentIndex + 1].value, (float)timeline / (float)keyframes[currentIndex + 1].time);
            if (timeline >= keyframes[currentIndex + 1].time && currentIndex != keyframes.Count) { currentIndex++; }
            if (timeline >= lastFrame) { run = false; }
        }
    }

    public struct Keyframe
    {
        public int time;
        public float value;
    }
}
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