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I am looking for a short and simple algorithm for java that will help with finding the LOGa(x) in a cyclic group Z*p. my method

would be log(prime_number, a, x)

this would compute the LOGaX in a cyclic group Z*p.

How would i go about doing this in an exhaustive search, or is there any simple way,

======================

edit added

so I have gone with the exhaustive search, just to help me understand the discrete log.

    //log(p,a,x) will return logaX in the cyclic group Z*p where p is 
//prime and a is a generator

public static BigInteger log(BigInteger p,BigInteger a,BigInteger x){
    boolean logFound = false;
    Random r = new Random();
    BigInteger k = new BigInteger(p.bitCount(),r);
    while(!logFound){

        if(a.modPow(k, p).equals(x)){

            logFound = true;
        }else{
            k = new BigInteger(p.bitCount(),r);
        }
    }
            //i dont think this is right
    return a
}

So i want to return the LOGaX of the cyclic group Z*p, am i doing this here or what am i missing?

============================

edit added

so i now return k and i am now doing a exhaustive search @pauloEbermann i dont understand what i should do with k=k.multiply(a).mod(p)

my new code looks like this

//log(p,a,x) will return LOGaX in the cyclic group Z*p where p is 
//prime and a is a generator

public static BigInteger log(BigInteger p,BigInteger a,BigInteger x){
    boolean logFound = false;
    Random r = new Random();
    BigInteger k = BigInteger.ONE;

    while(!logFound){
        if(a.modPow(k, p).equals(x)){
            logFound = true;
        }else{
            k = k.add(BigInteger.ONE);

        }
    }
    return k;
}

with this test data

public static void main(String[] args) {

    BigInteger p = new BigInteger("101");
    BigInteger a = new BigInteger("3");
    BigInteger x = new BigInteger("34");

    System.out.println(log(p,a,x));
}

So this returns k = 99

this means that the log3(34) mod 101 is equal to 99 would i be right in saying this?

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't you return k instead of a? You can do your return k right inside the loop instead of using an additional boolean variable there. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 27 '11 at 0:26
1  
But your method is not an exhaustive search, it is a randomized search. The simple variant would simply use k = k.add(BigInteger.ONE) here, and start with some small number. (Then you also would not need to use the modPow, but simply k = k.multiply(a).mod(p). –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 27 '11 at 0:32
    
edit added @paulo Ebermann –  molleman Apr 27 '11 at 1:26
    
why do i not need to use the modPow –  molleman Apr 27 '11 at 1:27
    
@molleman Do it by hand for a small group and you will see that at each iteration you only multiply the current power a^n by the base a (and reduce modulp p) to reach the next power a^n+1. The function modPow does a full exponentiation and would only burn unnecessary CPU. –  Peter G. Apr 27 '11 at 7:49

1 Answer 1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discrete_logarithm lists 7 algorithms for computing the discrete logarithm.

For understanding the discrete logarithm itself, I would use pen and paper and construct a table of all powers of a generator of a small cyclic group. The logarithm is the inverse, so you already have your table for logarithms if you flip the columns.

The naive algorithm works like this, only that you do not store the table but simply loop and multiply by a until the current power matches x and output the number of multiplications plus done plus one as the logarithm of x base a.

share|improve this answer
    
well im finding it hard to convert from the mathematical structures to java. if someone could give me a walkthrough through the simpliest form ,it would be great –  molleman Apr 26 '11 at 21:21
2  
The simplest discrete logarithm algorithm is exhaustive search: you try 1, 2, 3... as potential logarithm values until one matches (i.e. a.modPow(k, p).equals(x) for successive values of k). This is highly inefficient, but you cannot have more simple than that. –  Thomas Pornin Apr 26 '11 at 21:50
    
edit added to my post –  molleman Apr 26 '11 at 22:04

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