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How can I check if a float variable contains an integer value? So far, I've been using:

float f = 4.5886;
if (f-(int)f == 0)
     printf("yes\n");
else printf("no\n");

But I wonder if there is a better solution, or if this one has any (or many) drawbacks.

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5  
Your method fails when the number is greater than the maximum allowable integer value. –  Mark Ransom Apr 26 '11 at 22:08
    
See my answer for a fix the the problem with OP's approach. –  R.. Apr 26 '11 at 22:13
    
Surely the correct answer is: you are asking the wrong question. –  John Marshall Apr 27 '11 at 1:32
    
@John Marshall: So, what would be the correct question? –  sidyll Apr 28 '11 at 0:00
1  
Well, what is it that you're trying to do? If you're storing a value in a float, presumably it's because you want to do floating point arithmetic on it. Then your question becomes: does this variable, whose value is somewhat fluffy in domain-specific ways and in ways that depend on how carefully you do the arithmetic, have a value that's fluffily integral? To answer that meaningfully, you need to consider the domain-specific fluffiness. Or, put another way: what is this scenario in which the correct approach is not to store your value in an int of the appropriate size? –  John Marshall Apr 28 '11 at 13:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Apart from the fine answers already given, you can also use ceilf(f) == f or floorf(f) == f. Both expressions return true if f is an integer. They also returnfalse for NaNs (NaNs always compare unequal) and true for ±infinity, and don't have the problem with overflowing the integer type used to hold the truncated result, because floorf()/ceilf() return floats.

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Well, that defeats the purpose. What I want is to check if the float is an integer, as the title says; and not rounding it. In the latter case, I'd always have an integer. But thanks for pointing it out too. –  sidyll Apr 28 '11 at 0:03
    
@sidyll: both expressions round f, yes, but they do so in order to check whether it's an integer. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Apr 28 '11 at 5:20
    
@sidyll: more precisely: note how the result of the rounding operation is in turn compared to f, I've edited my answer to be more clear on this, thanks. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Apr 28 '11 at 5:28
    
I'm sorry! I should use glasses. Makes all sense. –  sidyll Apr 28 '11 at 17:57
2  
While this works, ceilf and floorf are unnecessarily expensive operations on at least some archs (mainly x86) due to the need to change and restore rounding mode. A faster test would be rintf(f)==f. With -fno-math-errno, GCC will compile rintf to a single inline instruction. –  R.. Jun 12 '13 at 18:37
if (f <= LONG_MIN || f >= LONG_MAX || f == (long)f) /* it's an integer */
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1  
If sizeof(f) > sizeof(long) this might not hold. –  Mark Ransom Apr 26 '11 at 22:27
    
long is required to be at least 32-bit. The C standard imposes no requirements whatsoever on the quality of floating-point types, but in reality float will always be either IEEE single-precision, or something worse, with less than 32 bits in the mantissa. –  R.. Apr 26 '11 at 22:31
2  
Just making the point in case someone finds this answer and tries to apply it to a double. –  Mark Ransom Apr 26 '11 at 22:34
1  
Good point. For double I would use long long and LLONG_MAX/LLONG_MIN. –  R.. Apr 26 '11 at 22:35
1  
@mangledorf: Your transformation is invalid. (long)f invokes undefined behavior if the value is not representable as long. Thus you have to make the comparisons first to be safe. –  R.. Sep 23 at 1:29

stdlib float modf (float x, float *ipart) splits into two parts, check if return value (fractional part) == 0.

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I just keep wondering if this isn't too expensive, if compared with my initial solution (as @R.. says in the other similar answer). –  sidyll Apr 28 '11 at 0:01
    
@sidyll: read more carefully: modf != fmod –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Apr 28 '11 at 5:21
2  
@mmutz: have I said I should use glasses? –  sidyll Apr 28 '11 at 17:58
if (fmod(f, 1) == 0.0) {
  ...
}

Don't forget math.h and libm.

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1  
This works, but in principle fmod is a rather expensive operation. –  R.. Apr 26 '11 at 22:21

I'm not 100% sure but when you cast f to an int, and subtract it from f, I believe it is getting cast back to a float. This probably won't matter in this case, but it could present problems down the line if you are expecting that to be an int for some reason.

I don't know if it's a better solution per se, but you could use modulus math instead, for example: float f = 4.5886; bool isInt; isInt = (f % 1.0 != 0) ? false : true; depending on your compiler you may or not need the .0 after the 1, again the whole implicit casts thing comes into play. In this code, the bool isInt should be true if the right of the decimal point is all zeroes, and false otherwise.

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1  
The % operator only works on integers. You're correct about the int being cast back to a float though. –  Mark Ransom Apr 26 '11 at 22:41
    
my mistake, i should have used (fmod(f , 1.0) != 0) instead. –  Controllerface Apr 27 '11 at 13:09
    
Yes, I'm aware that it will remain as float, but I just want to check it. –  sidyll Apr 28 '11 at 0:05
#define twop22 (0x1.0p+22)
#define ABS(x) (fabs(x))
#define isFloatInteger(x) ((ABS(x) >= twop22) || (((ABS(x) + twop22) - twop22) == ABS(x)))
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Keep in mind that most of the techniques here are valid presuming that round-off error due to prior calculations is not a factor. E.g. you could use roundf, like this:

float z = 1.0f;

if (roundf(z) == z) {
    printf("integer\n");
} else {
    printf("fraction\n");
}

The problem with this and other similar techniques (such as ceilf, casting to long, etc.) is that, while they work great for whole number constants, they will fail if the number is a result of a calculation that was subject to floating-point round-off error. For example:

float z = powf(powf(3.0f, 0.05f), 20.0f);

if (roundf(z) == z) {
    printf("integer\n");
} else {
    printf("fraction\n");
}

Prints "fraction", even though (31/20)20 should equal 3, because the actual calculation result ended up being 2.9999992847442626953125.

Any similar method, be it fmodf or whatever, is subject to this. In applications that perform complex or rounding-prone calculations, usually what you want to do is define some "tolerance" value for what constitutes a "whole number" (this goes for floating-point equality comparisons in general). We often call this tolerance epsilon. For example, lets say that we'll forgive the computer for up to +/- 0.00001 rounding error. Then, if we are testing z, we can choose an epsilon of 0.00001 and do:

if (fabsf(roundf(z) - z) <= 0.00001f) {
    printf("integer\n");
} else {
    printf("fraction\n");
}

You don't really want to use ceilf here because e.g. ceilf(1.0000001) is 2 not 1, and ceilf(-1.99999999) is -1 not -2.

You could use rintf in place of roundf if you prefer.

Choose a tolerance value that is appropriate for your application (and yes, sometimes zero tolerance is appropriate). For more information, check out this article on comparing floating-point numbers.

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