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I need to store a temporary list of records and was thinking that a TList would be a good way to do this? However I am unsure how to do this with a TList and was wondering if this is the best was and also if anyone has any examples of how to do this?

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8  
Nobody has explicitly suggested Generics.Collections.TList<T>. Worth considering in my view. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '11 at 2:42
    
@David: That's definately the way to go. I've found Generics.Collections.TList<T> is WAY faster if it's a large read-only list of records. –  Giel Apr 27 '11 at 9:22
    
@David: I suggested it. :-) There are problems still with by-reference and by-value semantics, that would cause a lot of data copying, when adding stuff to the Generics list, though. @Giel - Yes, for a read-only list of records, it's GREAT, unless you needed to "copy in" a whole lot of records from somewhere else. Then the data-copy penalty might hurt you. –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 14:30
    
@Warren All depends on how big the records are. –  David Heffernan Apr 27 '11 at 14:33
    
@David: Yep. 4 byte record = No problem. :-) –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 15:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to create your own descendant of TList. Here's a quick sample console app to demonstrate:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Classes;

type
  PMyRec=^TMyRec;
  TMyRec=record
    Value: Integer;
    AByte: Byte;
  end;

  TMyRecList=class(TList)
  private
    function Get(Index: Integer): PMyRec;
  public
    destructor Destroy; override;
    function Add(Value: PMyRec): Integer;
    property Items[Index: Integer]: PMyRec read Get; default;
  end;

{ TMyRecList }

function TMyRecList.Add(Value: PMyRec): Integer;
begin
  Result := inherited Add(Value);
end;

destructor TMyRecList.Destroy;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to Count - 1 do
    FreeMem(Items[i]);
  inherited;
end;

function TMyRecList.Get(Index: Integer): PMyRec;
begin
  Result := PMyRec(inherited Get(Index));
end;

var
  MyRecList: TMyRecList;
  MyRec: PMyRec;
  tmp: Integer;
begin
  MyRecList := TMyRecList.Create;
  for tmp := 0 to 9 do
  begin
    GetMem(MyRec, SizeOf(TMyRec));
    MyRec.Value := tmp;
    MyRec.AByte := Byte(tmp);
    MyRecList.Add(MyRec);
  end;

  for tmp := 0 to MyRecList.Count - 1 do
    Writeln('Value: ', MyRecList[tmp].Value, ' AByte: ', MyRecList[tmp].AByte);
  WriteLn('  Press Enter to free the list');
  ReadLn;
  MyRecList.Free;
end.

This eliminates a couple of things:

  • It handles freeing the memory.
  • You don't have to typecast everything to use it.

As Remy and Warren both said, it's a little more work because you have to allocate the memory when you add new records.

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2  
+1 nice code Ken –  Johan Apr 27 '11 at 0:02
    
+1 Ken for create a TList descendent class –  RRUZ Apr 27 '11 at 5:20
    
You still have to allocate memory yourself manually, using GetMem, everywhere. If someone was to declare a record type on a heap somewhere, and add it to a MyRecList, you would get into trouble. Because this would get the obvious beginner into trouble I am down voting this very clever and interesting piece of code. –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 13:31
    
@Warren: I pointed that out in my last paragraph, so your point is moot. You've made your opinion clear in several posts here. Downvoting me because I disagreed with you seems pretty petty, but whatever. –  Ken White Apr 27 '11 at 13:48
    
It's about thinking about the new kids. Not petty. You pointed out more work, but not the safety aspects of record types and the stack/heap thing. –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 14:29

We've just run into a similar issue here with a generic list of records. Hope the following psuedo code helps.

type
  PPat = ^TPat;
  TPat = record
    data: integer;
  end;

...
var
    AList: TList<PPat>;

...
procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  obj: PPat;
begin
  obj := AList[0];
  obj.data := 1;
  Assert(obj.data = AList[0].data);  // correct
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  obj: PPat;
begin
  AList := TList<PPat>.Create;
  GetMem(obj, SizeOf(TPat));  // not shown but need to FreeMem when items are removed from the list
  obj.data := 2;
  AList.Add(obj);
end;
share|improve this answer

First, if you want to combine a classic TList with Records, you will need to:

  1. Allocate your records on the heap, not on the stack. Use GetMem as Remy did.
  2. Take the address of the record and add it to the TList.
  3. When removing an item from the list, and using it, dereference it:
  4. Remember to free and clean up, afterwards.

Combining Lists with Records requires so much "pointers-and-heap-management" work that such a technique would be only within the capabilities of an expert.

Alternatives to what you have asked for that still use something called "TList", include using a generics.collections style TList, with Record types, which would have all the benefits of TList, but would require you to basically do a lot of entire-record-copies to get data into it.

The most idiomatic Delphi ways to do what you ask are to either:

  1. use a TList or TObjectList with a Class Types instead of a record. Usually you end up subclassing either TList or TObjectList in this case.

  2. Use a dynamic Array of Record Types, but be aware that it's harder to sort an Array type, and that expanding an array type at runtime isn't as speedy as it is with a TList.

  3. Use generics.Collections TList with your classes. This lets you avoid subclassing TList or TObjectList each time you want to use a list with a different class.

A code sample showing Dynamic arrays:

 TMyRec = record
    ///
 end;

 TMyRecArray = array of TMyRec;

 procedure Demo;
 var
    myRecArray:TMyRecArray;
 begin
    SetLength(myRecArray,10);
 end;

Now for some background information on why TList is not easy to use with Record types:

TList is better suited for use with Class types, because a variable of type 'TMyClass', where 'type TMyClass = class .... end;' can be easily "referred to" as a pointer value, which is what TList holds.

Variables of type Record are value-Types in Delphi, whereas class values are implicitly by-reference values. You can think of by-reference values as stealth-pointers. You don't have to dereference them to get at their contents, but when you add it to a TList, you're actually just adding a pointer to the TList, not making a copy or allocating any new memory.

The answer by Remy shows you literally you how to do exactly what you want, and I am writing my answer only because I want to warn you about the details of what you are asking, and suggest that you consider alternatives too.

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1  
@Warren: The problem with arrays is that they aren't as easily sorted. I agree with the class type recommendation, though; you can more easily manage them with TObjectList. (BTW, the ^ is almost entirely optional now; the compiler handles most of that for you and you don't need it.) –  Ken White Apr 26 '11 at 23:16
1  
@Warren: The second problem with your answer (as I read it more carefully) is that it doesn't answer the actual question asked. It clearly demonstrates your feelings about pointers and records, but doesn't address the question "How do I store records in a TList". Sorry; I have to down-vote here. If I post the question "I cut my finger off with a kitchen knife while chopping vegetables. How do I stop the bleeding before I bleed out?", your answer shouldn't be "You should be more careful with a knife so you don't cut yourself.". Answer the question, and then post your opinions on other options. –  Ken White Apr 27 '11 at 0:12
1  
I'll edit my answer, to try to do it in that order. Ok? –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 13:05
2  
I have edited, and removed most of my opinions. I have instead pointed at what is commonly done in this language and environment, and what is not commonly done, and why. –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 13:22
1  
Another example of a user doing exactly what I did is here, and I happen to agree that this user tried to educate the person answering the question. Note the upvotes. Would you downvote this guy Ken: stackoverflow.com/questions/5774598/… –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 13:33

You can take a look at our TDynArray wrapper. It's defined in an Open Source unit, working from Delphi 6 up to XE.

With TDynArray, you can access any dynamic array (like TIntegerDynArray = array of integer or TRecordDynArray = array of TMyRecord) using TList-like properties and methods, e.g. Count, Add, Insert, Delete, Clear, IndexOf, Find, Sort and some new methods like LoadFromStream, SaveToStream, LoadFrom and SaveTo which allow fast binary serialization of any dynamic array, even containing strings or records - a CreateOrderedIndex method is also available to create individual index according to the dynamic array content. You can also serialize the array content into JSON, if you wish. Slice, Reverse or Copy methods are also available.

It will handle a dynamic array of records, and even records within records, with strings or other dynamic arrays inside.

When using an external Count variable, you can speed up a lot the adding of elements in the referred dynamic array.

type
  TPerson = packed record
    sCountry: string;
    sFullName: string;
    sAddress: string;
    sCity: string;
    sEmployer: string;
  end;
  TPersons = array of TPerson;
var
  MyPeople: TPersons;

(...)
procedure SavePeopleToStream(Stream: TMemoryStream);
var aPeople: TPerson;
    aDynArray: TDynArray;
begin
  aDynArray.Init(TypeInfo(TPersons),MyPeople);
  aPeople.sCountry := 'France';
  aPeople.sEmployer := 'Republique';
  aDynArray.Add(aPeople);
  aDynArray.SaveToStream(Stream);
end; // no try..finally Free needed here

There is also a TDynArrayHashed class, which allow internal hashing of a dynamic array content. It's very fast and able to hash any kind of data (there are standard hashers for strings, but you can supply your own - even the hash function can be customized).

Note that TDynArray and TDynArrayHashed are just wrappers around an existing dynamic array variable. You can therefore initialize a TDynArray wrapper on need, to access more efficiently any native Delphi dynamic array.

share|improve this answer
    
@Ken White (by anticipation :) ) Yes, this is not a true TList implementation, I know. But it's definitively a TList-like implementation, faster than using a TList (since records are allocated by chunk). TList is NOT meant to store records, but pointers. And in our wrapper, there are methods you don't have with a TList, like hashing, internal saving or loading to memory or stream, sort with an external integer look-up index, Slice methods, and such. We use this e.g. in our framework for instance to store a cache of compiled SQL statements, in a few lines of code. –  Arnaud Bouchez Apr 27 '11 at 5:47

It all depends on the type of data you want to store.

You might consider using TCollection and TCollectionItem.

Here is (edited) code from a working unit, in which I used TCollection to read a list of report definitions from a folder. Each report consisted of a sort of template and an SQL statement which had to be stored together with a file name.

Since it is edited, and uses some of my own units (TedlFolderRtns reads files into an internal list, to name but one), the example is simple enough to be useful. With a few replace all, you can adapt to whatever your need.

Look up TCollection in the help, you can do a lot with it. And it keeps your code handling nicely grouped together in a class-like structure.

  unit cReports;
  interface
  uses
     SysUtils, Classes, XMLDoc, XMLIntf, Variants,
     // dlib - Edelcom
     eIntList, eProgSettings,eFolder ;
  type

     TReportDefItem = class(TCollectionItem)
     private
        fSql: string;
        fSkeleton: string;
        fFileName: string;
        procedure Load;
        procedure SetFileName(const Value: string);
     public
        constructor Create(Collection:TCollection); override;
        destructor Destroy ; override;

        property FileName: string read fFileName write SetFileName;
        property Sql : string read fSql write fSql;
        property Skeleton : string read fSkeleton write fSkeleton;
     end;

     TReportDefList = class(TCollection)
     private
        function OsReportFolder: string;
        function GetAction(const Index: integer): TReportDefItem;
     public
        constructor Create(ItemClass: TCollectionItemClass);
        destructor Destroy; override;

        procedure LoadList;

        function Add : TReportDefItem;
        property Action [ const Index:integer ]: TReportDefItem read GetAction;
     end;

  implementation

  { TReportDefList }

  constructor TReportDefList.Create(ItemClass: TCollectionItemClass);
  begin
     inherited;
  end;

  destructor TReportDefList.Destroy;
  begin
     inherited;
  end;
  function TReportDefList.Add: TReportDefItem;
  begin
     Result := TReportDefItem( Add() );
  end;

  function TReportDefList.GetAction(const Index: integer): TReportDefItem;
  begin
     if (Index >= 0) and (Index < Count)
     then Result := TReportDefItem( Items[Index] )
     else Result := Nil;
  end;

  procedure TReportDefList.LoadList;
  var Folder : TedlFolderRtns;
      i : integer;
      Itm : TReportDefItem;
  begin
     Folder := TedlFolderRtns.Create;
     try
        Folder.FileList( OsReportFolder,'*.sw.xml', False);
        for i := 0 to Folder.ResultListCount -1 do
        begin
          Itm := Add();
          Itm.FileName := Folder.ResultList[i];
        end;
     finally
        FreeAndNil(Folder);
     end;
  end;

  function TReportDefList.OsReportFolder: string;
  begin
     Result := Application.ExeName + '_RprtDef';
  end;

  { TReportDefItem }

  constructor TReportDefItem.Create(Collection: TCollection);
  begin
     inherited;
     fSql := '';
     fSkeleton := '';
  end;

  destructor TReportDefItem.Destroy;
  begin
    inherited;
  end;

  procedure TReportDefItem.Load;
  var XMLDoc : IXMLDocument;
      TopNode : IXMLNode;
      FileNode : IXmlNode;
      iWebIndex, iRemoteIndex : integer;
      sWebVersion, sRemoteVersion: string;
      sWebFileName: string;
  begin
     if not FileExists(fFileName ) then Exit;

     XMLDoc := TXMLDocument.Create(nil);
     try
        XMLDoc.LoadFromFile( fFileName );
        XMLDoc.Active := True;

        TopNode := XMLDoc.ChildNodes.FindNode('sw-report-def');
        if not Assigned(TopNode) then Exit;

        FileNode := TopNode.ChildNodes.First;
        while Assigned(FileNode) do
        begin
           fSql := VarToStr( FileNode.Attributes['sql'] );
           fSkeleton := VarToStr(  FileNode.Attributes['skeleton'] );
           FileNode := FileNode.NextSibling;
        end;
        XMLDoc.Active := False;
     finally
        XMLDoc := Nil;
     end;
  end;

  procedure TReportDefItem.SetFileName(const Value: string);
  begin
     if fFileName <> Value
     then begin
        fFileName := Value;
        Load;
     end;
  end;
  end.

Use as :

fReports := TReportDefList.Create( TReportDefItem );
fReports.LoadList();
share|improve this answer

You can use TList for that, eg:

type
  pRec = ^sRec;
  sRec = record
    Value: Integer;
    ...
  end;

var
  List: TList;
  Rec: pRec;
  I: Integer;
begin
  List := TList.Create;
  try
    for I := 1 to 5 do begin
      GetMem(Rec);
      try
        Rec^.Value := ...;
        ...
        List.Add(Rec);
      except
        FreeMem(Rec);
        raise;
      end;
    end;
    ...
    for I := 0 to List.Count-1 do
    begin
      Rec := pRec(List[I]);
      ...
    end;
    ...
    for I := 0 to List.Count-1 do
      FreeMem(pRec(List[I]));
    List.Clear;
  finally
    List.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that in this case, Remy is solving the by-Value and by-reference semantic gap by having Rec be declared as pRec, which is a pointer type. I would argue he should call that variable PointerToARecord, or something. Most delphi programmers prefer to avoid directly using pointers where possible, thus the newer TList<Generic> and the classic dynamic-array features of Delphi are usually preferable. –  Warren P Apr 26 '11 at 23:06
4  
-1 pointer magic and newbies don't mix. –  Johan Apr 27 '11 at 0:01
1  
@Warren: Delphi convention says that PMyRec means pointer to TMyRec. Read any of the RTL/VCL that uses pointers to see examples. Calling it PointerToARecord is redundant and long-winded. We get that you don't like pointers; that doesn't mean they don't have a place in the language. –  Ken White Apr 27 '11 at 0:06
1  
I would use New and Dispose instead of GetMem, FreeMem. The poster could be using strings, interfaces or some other lifetime managed variable in his records. –  The_Fox Apr 27 '11 at 6:49
    
It's nothing to do with don't like. Pointers and newbies don't mix. As johan said. You're showing the newby a lawnmower and you're asking him to put his hand under the deck while it's running. –  Warren P Apr 27 '11 at 13:14

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