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I'm trying to initialize a class constructor within another constructor. The GCC raises the error, 'Type 'foo' does not have a call operator.'This psuedo-code should explain my intentions.

class foo {  
    type arg1, arg2;
    foo (type _arg1, type _arg2) {  
        _arg1=arg1;  
        _arg2=arg2;  
    }  
}

class foo2 {  
    foo member;

    foo2(type _arg1, type _arg2) {  
        member(_arg1, _arg2);  
    }  
}
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Welcome to Stack Overflow. It would have been very helpful if you had pasted in actual code instead of ESP code. The actual code could have been exactly the same number of lines, and approximately the same number of characters. –  Robᵩ Apr 27 '11 at 2:35

5 Answers 5

The pseudo-code may explain your intention but it doesn't explain your error as it doesn't error in the way you describe:

class foo {  
    type arg1, arg2;
    foo (type _arg1, type _arg2) {  
        _arg1=arg1;  
        _arg2=arg2;  
    }  
}

class foo2 {  
    foo member;

    foo2(type _arg1, type _arg2) {  
        member(_arg1, _arg2);  
    }  
}

Although it does yield helpful diagnostics:

gcc -Wall junk.cc 
junk.cc: In constructor ‘foo2::foo2(int, int)’:
junk.cc:12:32: error: no matching function for call to ‘foo::foo()’
junk.cc:3:5: note: candidates are: foo::foo(int, int)
junk.cc:1:11: note:                 foo::foo(const foo&)
junk.cc:13:28: error: no match for call to ‘(foo) (int&, int&)’
junk.cc: At global scope:
junk.cc:14:5: error: expected unqualified-id at end of input

Which shows that you shouldn't post "sorta like" code here and expect useful answer.

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Two issues:

First, your foo constructor should be public, as stated in Mark's answer.

Second, to initialize the member with its constructor, you should use the following syntax:

foo2(type _arg1, type _arg2) :
   member(_arg1, _arg2)
   { /* code */ }  
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1  
I think it's time to go to bed - I don't know how I missed that. –  Mark Ransom Apr 27 '11 at 2:07
    
@Randen: If you consider that the base classes and member variables are constructed before the body of the constructor is entered, and their constructors need to know their arguments (if not using the default constructor), then you can see how the initialiser list fits in.... –  Tony D Apr 27 '11 at 3:41

You're trying to use member's constructor. You should do that in the initializer list and not in the constructor body, i.e.:

foo2(type _arg1, type _arg2)
    : member(_arg1, _arg2)
{  
}  
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By the way, your argument assignments in foo's constructor are backwards. And you should also be using the initializer list for that as well. –  Pablo Apr 27 '11 at 2:06

You want the initializer list:

foo2(type _arg1, type _arg2) : member(_arg1,_arg2) { }
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Your constructors are not public; by default, everything in a class is private unless you specify otherwise. I'm not sure this explains your exact error message though.

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