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How do I create an input function that opens the input file and reads in the data from the file? And does that file have to be stored in a certain location? Can I do this just saving it on my desktop as a text file? This is what I have so far

#include <stdio.h>  /* NULL is defined here */
#include <stdlib.h> /* for malloc() */
#include <string.h> /* for string related functions */

#define  NAME_LEN  10

struct data {
   char  name[NAME_LEN];
   int   age;
   int   weight;
};

typedef  struct data  DATA;

struct linked_list {
   DATA                d;
   struct linked_list * next;
};

typedef  struct linked_list  ELEMENT;
typedef  ELEMENT *           LINK;

/* function prototypes */
LINK create_list_from_file(const char *);
void print_list_to_file(LINK, const char *, const char *);
int count(LINK, const int, const int);
LINK lookup(const DATA, LINK);
void insert(LINK, LINK, LINK);

nt main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   LINK head, found, to_add;
   char *in_file_name = "infile";   /* default input file name */
   char *out_file_name = "outfile"; /* default output file name */
   int a = 20, w = 150;  /* will be used as the age limit and weight limit */


   /* The input and output files can be given as command line arguments */ 
   switch (argc) {
   case 1:
      printf("The default input and output files are %s and %s.\n",
              in_file_name, out_file_name);
      break;
   case 2: 
      printf("The input file is %s and the default output file is %s.\n",
              argv[1], out_file_name);
      in_file_name = argv[1]; 
      break;
   case 3:
      printf("The input file is %s and the output file is %s.\n",
              argv[1], argv[2]);
      in_file_name = argv[1]; 
      out_file_name = argv[2];
      break;
   default:
      printf("The input file is %s and the output file is %s.\n",
              argv[1], argv[2]);
      in_file_name = argv[1]; 
      out_file_name = argv[2];
      printf("The remaining arguments are not used.\n");
   }

/*
1. invoke create_list_from_file() function to create a linear linked list 
   from the data in the input file,
*/
   head = create_list_from_file(in_file_name);
/*
2. invoke print_list_to_file() function with the writing mode ("w"),
*/
   print_list_to_file(head, out_file_name, "w");
/*
3. invoke the count() function,
4. output the counted result to the screen,
*/
   printf("The number of people with age over %d and weight over %d is %d.\n", 
           a, w, count(head, a, w));
/*
5. invoke the lookup() function and insert() function, and
*/
   /* prepare an element to be looked-up and added */
   to_add = malloc(sizeof(ELEMENT));
   strcpy(to_add -> d.name, "Janet");
   to_add -> d.age = 21;
   to_add -> d.weight = 150;
   to_add -> next = NULL;

   found = lookup(to_add -> d, head);
   insert(head, found, to_add);
/* 
6. invoke print_list_to_file() function with the append mode ("a").
*/
   print_list_to_file(head, out_file_name, "a");

/* 
repeat step 5 with an element that does not exist in the current list 
*/
   /* prepare an element to be looked-up and added */
   to_add = malloc(sizeof(ELEMENT));
   strcpy(to_add -> d.name, "Jerry");
   to_add -> d.age = 24;
   to_add -> d.weight = 220;
   to_add -> next = NULL;

   found = lookup(to_add -> d, head);
   insert(head, found, to_add);
/* 
repeat step 6: invoke print_list_to_file() function with the append mode ("a").
*/
   print_list_to_file(head, out_file_name, "a");

   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The file doesn't have to be in a specific location. Just Google "C file read example" and you will find plenty of examples. The code above has nothing to do with reading files. –  Joel Lee Apr 27 '11 at 4:39
    
sorry, posted the wrong code –  Jacob Apr 27 '11 at 4:42
    
@jonsca: That's not true, in_file_name is a char *, and can certainly point to argv[1]. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 27 '11 at 4:51
    
@jonsca - it will most likely segfault if he does that, since he hasn't allocated memory for in_file_name. Also, as long as he doesn't try to overwrite in_file_name, what he has will work fine. He is simply setting a pointer to point at the argument, essentially for convenience. –  Joel Lee Apr 27 '11 at 4:52
    
Here is an example: roseindia.net/c-tutorials/c-file-read.shtml. BTW, is this homework? If so, you should edit your question and add the homework tag. Are you having problems with the file read code, or creating a function to do it? –  Joel Lee Apr 27 '11 at 4:53

1 Answer 1

You can open with standard library almost any file on your computer, including accessible network storage. Either text or binary files could be read, including simple ".txt" files. For example you can read one integer from file :

#include <stdio.h>
...
int i;
FILE *f;
f= fopen("D:\Temp\SomeFile.txt", "r");
fscanf(f, "%d", &i);
fclose(f);

You can use line-oriented semantic if you want (as in the example above) - look C library reference for fopen etc. There should be some example which may be useful also.

share|improve this answer
    
This will fail, you need to escape the backslashes when embedding them in string literals. –  unwind Apr 27 '11 at 7:22

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