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i have a process

Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime() ;
Process p = rt.exec(filebase+port+"/hlds.exe +ip "+ip+" +maxplayers "+players+ " -game cstrike -console +port "+port+" -nojoy -noipx -heapsize 250000 +map de_dust2 +servercfgfile server.cfg +lservercfgfile +mapcyclefile mapcycle.txt +motdfile motd.txt +logsdir logs -zone 2048",null,  new File(filebase+port)) ;

i want to keep a check on this process whether its running or has crashed in case of crash want to restart it, this Process can have multiple instance available depending upon the port

Can i trace this thing on Linux as well as on windows? Read some articles on it but this 1 is bit different, since it involves multiple occurrences and have to check on some particular process only

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boolean isRunning(Process process) {
    try {
        process.exitValue();
        return false;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return true;
    }
}

See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Process.html#exitValue()

share|improve this answer
    
I know that control flow should not use exceptions, but Java haven't given us a better alternative. – AlikElzin-kilaka Apr 19 '13 at 6:28

You can do a p.waitFor() so the thread that executed the statement waits till the process is complete. You can then do the cleanup/restart logic right after, as that code will get executed when the process dies. However I am not sure how this would work if the process hangs instead of dying, but this could be worth a try. By the way I would recommend using Java Service Wrapper and supervisord in your case if this is something you're going to do on production.

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in this case i should create a new thread everytime i am starting a new process? and keep polling on same thread? – Varun Apr 29 '11 at 5:59

As of Java 8 you can do:

process.isAlive()

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Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – Bhargav Rao Mar 14 at 20:31

Java 5 and on have a way to handle this using java.util.concurrent.Future.

A Future represents the result of an asynchronous computation. Methods are provided to check if the computation is complete, to wait for its completion, and to retrieve the result of the computation. The result can only be retrieved using method get when the computation has completed, blocking if necessary until it is ready. Cancellation is performed by the cancel method. Additional methods are provided to determine if the task completed normally or was cancelled. Once a computation has completed, the computation cannot be cancelled. If you would like to use a Future for the sake of cancellability but not provide a usable result, you can declare types of the form Future and return null as a result of the underlying task.

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1  
dint understand the method... any clear explaination please :) – Varun Apr 27 '11 at 11:21
    
In Java 5, a new vary powerful package was added, java.util.concurrent. It makes managing subprocesses much easier by providing classes that know how to work with different use cases efficiently and in a thread-safe manner. If you need to implement a producer/consumer, or a blocking queue, or a scheduled task, most of the hard work is done for you. The Future class is used to track the status of a thread, and even get a return value from it when it exist. It seems that using this package, and Future in particular, would save you a lot of work. – dj_segfault Apr 30 '11 at 1:49
1  
What's the connection between Process and Future? – AlikElzin-kilaka Mar 28 '13 at 10:59
public class ProcessEndNotifier extends Thread
{
    Process process;
    MyClass classThatNeedsToBeNotified;

    public ProcessEndNotifier(MyClass classThatNeedsToBeNotified, Process process)
    {
        this.process = process;
        this.classThatNeedsToBeNotified = classThatNeedsToBeNotified;
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        try {
            process.waitFor();
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e) {
            classThatNeedsToBeNotified.processEnded();
        }
        classThatNeedsToBeNotified.processEnded();
    }
}

Now you can know if a process in running like this:

public class MyClass
{
    boolean isProcessRunning;       

    public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("foo -bar");
        isProcessRunning = true;
        new ProcessEndNotifier(this, process).run();
    }

    public void processEnded()
    {
        isProcessRunning = false;
        // Or just do stuff here!
    }
}
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