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Here's a bit of javascript taken from this reddit post:

function Stream() {
    var data       = [],
        listeners  = [];

    function push( new_data ) {
        var result = data.push( new_data );
        callListeners( new_data, result );
        return result;
    }

    function addListener( listener ) {
        return listeners.push( listener );
    }

    function callListeners( ) {
        var length    = listeners.length,
            result    = [],
            action    = null;
        while ( length-- ) {
            action = listeners[ length ];
            result.push( action.apply( null, arguments) );
        }
        return result;
    }

    return {
        push : push,
        addListener: addListener
    }

}


var foo = Stream();
foo.addListener( function( new_data ) {
    alert( "added: " + new_data );
});
foo.push( "Hello World!" );

I think I have a tenuous grasp on Closures after reading this tutorial, but I just can't figure out how this code works. When I try to parse it in my head, I basically get stuck at line 6: var result = data.push( new_data );.

It seems with data simply being an array at that point data.push( foo ) doesn't make sense. And wouldn't it recurse infinitely anyway? (strike that -- didn't know there was a native push method for arrays) Very next line callListener is called with two parameters, but below the function has none.

If someone's got a few minutes, could you grab my hand and walk me through this code like the ignorant dolt I am? Right now, I'm not even sure I understand the destination.

share|improve this question
    
why would it be infinite? arrays have a native push method and that code is not calling function push( new_data ) – Hristo Apr 27 '11 at 5:09
    
@Hristo - I didn't know there was a native method. I thought this referred to the push function. – Greg Apr 27 '11 at 5:10
    
@Greg... well that is an easy fix :) check out my answer – Hristo Apr 27 '11 at 5:14
    
nope; it's the array's push function. I could see how you could be confused - this is a weak programming decision, in my opinion. It would be better to call it something like stack or store. Something generic that isn't as commonly used as Array.push – vol7ron Apr 27 '11 at 5:18
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Arrays are objects, and they have a push() method. Nothing unusual there.

The callListeners() function doesn't declare any named parameters, but JavaScript allows functions to be called with more parameters than they're declared to take, and the full list of arguments is available as the special name arguments. callListeners() uses arguments in an action.apply() call, to invoke the action function with the same list of arguments that callListeners() itself was given. The purpose of callListeners() is that you call it with some arguments, and it calls all the functions in the listeners array with those arguments.

Neither of those things is really related to the use of closures, though. The place where closures come into play is that the object returned by Stream() has two methods, push() and addListener(), that can "see" the same data and listeners arrays even though those arrays aren't stored in the object that the methods are called on. Two calls to Stream() will return two objects whose methods see different data and listeners arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I think that clears it all up for me. – Greg Apr 27 '11 at 5:19
> function Stream() {
>     var data       = [],
>         listeners  = [];
> 
>     function push( new_data ) {
>         var result = data.push( new_data );

data is a reference to data in the outer function. The return value from data.push(...) is the length of the array after new_data has been added.

>         callListeners( new_data, result );
>         return result;
>     }

callListeners() is a call to the function declared with that name below.

>     function addListener( listener ) {
>         return listeners.push( listener );
>     }

This adds listener to listeners and returns the new length of the listeners array.

>     function callListeners( ) {
>         var length    = listeners.length,
>             result    = [],
>             action    = null;
>         while ( length-- ) {
>             action = listeners[ length ];
>             result.push( action.apply( null, arguments) );
>         }
>         return result;
>     }

The above function calls all the listeners in the listeners array with the arguments that have been passed to it. It calls them in reverse order though (i.e. the last one added is called first, then the second last, and so on), which is a bit unusual.

>     return {
>         push : push,
>         addListener: addListener
>     }

Returns an object with properties push (whose value is a reference to the function declared with the name push), and addListener (whose value is a reference to the function declared with the name addListener)

> }
> 
> 
> var foo = Stream();

By convention, functions whose name starts with a capital letter are constructors and should be called with the new operator. Stream is not a constructor so should start with a lower case s.

> foo.addListener( function( new_data )
> {
>     alert( "added: " + new_data ); });

That calls foo.addListener (which is a reference to the "closed over" addListener function created when Stream() was called above) and passes it an anonymous function. Nothing is done with the return value.

> foo.push( "Hello World!" );

That calls the (closed over) push function and passes it the string "Hello World!". push then calls callListeners(), passing it the same string. callListeners then calls every function in the listeners array (there's only one so far, the anonymous function added above), passing it the parameters supplied to push() (i.e. "Hello World!").

So the result is an alert with "added: Hello World!".

If you add another listener, then calling foo.push() will call both listeners with the supplied arguments, but in the reverse order to which they were added.

share|improve this answer

First of all, push is a method on the Array class:

Mutates an array by appending the given elements and returning the new length of the array.

So var result = data.push( new_data ); just appends new_data to data and sets result to the new number of elements in data.

The callListeners bit is tricky. The action will be a function and it will be called by using the apply method on that function (note: functions are objects in JavaScript). You'll also see arguments in there, that's a special variable that is:

An array-like object corresponding to the arguments passed to a function.

So, if you want to unpack the argument list yourself (like using @_ in Perl, or variable argument lists in C or C++) or if you're just planning on passing the full argument list to someone else that wants an array, then you can use arguments. Normally you'd say:

var a = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);

To explicitly convert the arguments to a real array. However, in this case apply is happy to take a raw arguments pseudo-array so there's no need for the "slice cast".

share|improve this answer
    
Heh. That callListeners function is actually almost as clever as it was confusing. – Greg Apr 27 '11 at 5:36
    
Array is a Function object, it is not a "class". push is a method of Array.prototype, not Array. You could say it is a method of an Array instance - which is like a class method, but there are no classes in javascript. :-) – RobG Apr 27 '11 at 5:46
    
@Greg - presumably the arguments passed to foo.push() should be generic for all listeners, say event and this (i.e. the element on which the listener should be called). – RobG Apr 27 '11 at 5:51
    
@RobG: Yes, Array instanceof Function if you want to be pedantic. OTOH, [1] instanceof Array so referring to Array as a class is reasonable and fairly common. I don't see much point in confusing someone with a bunch of noise on prototype based inheritance until after they've wrapped their head around closures, implicit argument lists, and "functions as objects". – mu is too short Apr 27 '11 at 5:55

JavaScript arrays have a native push() method. Check out this article...

http://www.hunlock.com/blogs/Mastering_Javascript_Arrays

... so the code isn't calling function push( new_data ){} recursively, it is referring to the array's native push() method.

If it was recursive, it would instead be var result = this.push( new_data ); which would make it infinite :)

I hope this helps.
Hristo

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm still confused about the following line though. How is callListeners( new_data, result ); valid if the function is defined having no parameters? – Greg Apr 27 '11 at 5:16
1  
@Greg... in regard to the callListeners(), check out Wyzard's answer. – Hristo Apr 27 '11 at 5:19
1  
@Greg, because within callListeners, the name arguments automatically refers to a 2-element array containing those two values. – Wyzard Apr 27 '11 at 5:19

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