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I have written an iPhone app that has been through a few releases, and for every release I do something that doesn't feel right, but haven't been able to find a better method.

My app is translated into 16 languages, and every release adds or modifies a couple of strings in the interface. Thus I have to translate those few sentences 16 times over. I accept this - there's no way around it. But the way I do it sucks..

I copy the existing already-translated Localizable.strings files (in the pl.proj, etc folders) to Localisable.1.0.4.strings (where 1.0.4 is my old version number).
I then run genstrings to update the main Localisable.strings file, and then recreate all the translations again. I then have to go through each of the 16 files, manually copying over sections of the stuff I did for the last release from my backup file, and indispersing them with the new translations. It's ugly, and error-prone (copy/paste error, anyone?)

Someone more savvy than I has surely figured out the right way for incremental translating, right?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does it count as an answer if I suggest my company's product? Amanuens is a web application that simplifies the management of the localization process. It works like this:

  1. you configure a connection to your source code repository
  2. the app scans the repository and finds resource files, figuring out which strings are already translated
  3. every time you commit changes into the repository, Amanuens detects them and notifies translators via email
  4. translators work in their web browser and the editor highlights new strings so they spot them easily, without having to scan hundreds items
  5. when they're done, Amanuens can commit changes back into the repo, without any manual intervention.

I hope this is what you're looking for (and I also hope the moderators won't remove my answer :)

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Fair enough - it does solve my problem.. –  DefenestrationDay May 2 '11 at 6:27
1  
Sounds like a nice service, but opening source code to a remote web service is not very business friendly. –  jonsibley Aug 31 '12 at 17:52

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