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I am seeing this in an xml file (particularly xml/rdf file)

 <rdf:RDF
  xmlns:geoname="http://www.geonames.org/onto#"
  xmlns:a="http://www.w3.org/2000/10/annotation-ns"
  xmlns:filtr="http://www.machinetags.org/wiki/filtr#process"
  xmlns:ph="http://www.machinetags.org/wiki/ph#camera"
  xmlns:exif="http://nwalsh.com/rdf/exif#"
  xmlns:mt="x-urn:flickr:machinetag:"
  xmlns:exifi="http://nwalsh.com/rdf/exif-intrinsic"
  xmlns:geonames="http://www.machinetags.org/wiki/geonames#locality"
  xmlns:dcterms="http://purl.org/dc/terms/"
  xmlns:places="http://www.flickr.com/places/"
  xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
  xmlns:geo="http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#"
  xmlns:acl="http://www.w3.org/2001/02/acls#"
  xmlns:skos="http://www.w3.org/2004/02/skos/core#"
  xmlns:foaf="http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/"
  xmlns:rdfs="http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#"
  xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
  xmlns:computer="x-urn:freebsd:"
  xmlns:flickr="x-urn:flickr:"
 >

what does all the 'x-urn' in namespace declarations mean?

share|improve this question
1  
It doesn't mean anything. Namespace URIs are supposed to be valid URIs, but very few products complain if they aren't; valid URIs are supposed to have a registered "scheme" part (e.g. "http" or "urn") but no-one's likely to complain if they don't; someone here has decided it's smart to invent their own scheme names, for reasons best known to themselves. Generally, a namespace URI can be anything you like. – Michael Kay Apr 27 '11 at 9:03
    
erm, i got it from here cpan.uwinnipeg.ca/htdocs/Net-Flickr-RDF/README.html – Jeffrey04 Apr 28 '11 at 14:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd guess that they're Uniform Resource Names with an "x-" prefix on the scheme to indicate that they're extensions (i.e. not on the registered list). You'll see "x-" prefix notation for extensions in email headers, HTTP headers, and even MIME types.

Sorry, I don't have a list of authoritative references to back up my guess but maybe it will help anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
just a quick question, is the urn mentioned in the original question related to this? tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2141 – Jeffrey04 Apr 27 '11 at 8:57
    
@Jeffrey04: Yes, that's my guess. The Wikipedia page I linked to references RFC-2141. – mu is too short Apr 27 '11 at 9:36

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