Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm having an issue using sqlite to create a table only if it doesn't exist. Basically, I have a table that I'm dropping and remaking once in a long while. However, if the table already existed (before I drop and remake it), then I get the following error when trying to insert for the first time:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 40, in <module>
    remake()
  File "test.py", line 31, in remake
    insert_record(1)
  File "test.py", line 36, in insert_record
    c.execute(sql)
sqlite3.OperationalError: no such table: table_name

At this point the table does not exist (for some reason), so the next time I run the script no errors occur. Basically, if I keep running the test script, exactly every other run will result in an error, and I'm stumped as to why - but I have determined that creating the database without using if not exists fixes the issue. I still don't know what the original problem is though, and I'd appreciate if anyone could point me in the right direction. Test script demonstrating the problem below:

import sqlite3

location = 'data'
table_name = 'table_name'

def init():    
    global conn
    global c
    conn = sqlite3.connect(location)
    c = conn.cursor()
    create_database()

def create_database():
    sql = 'create table if not exists ' + table_name + ' (id integer)'
    c.execute(sql)
    conn.commit()

def create_database2():
    sql = 'create table ' + table_name + '(id integer)'
    c.execute(sql)
    conn.commit()

def clear_database():
    sql = 'drop table ' + table_name
    c.execute(sql)
    conn.commit()

def remake():
    clear_database()
    create_database() # Replacing this with create_database2() works every time
    insert_record(1)
    conn.commit()

def insert_record(id):
    sql = 'insert into ' + table_name + ' (id) values (%d)' % (id)
    c.execute(sql)
    print 'Inserted ', id

init()
remake()

Thanks in advance :)

share|improve this question
up vote 21 down vote accepted

I can duplicate the issue with the following simplified script:

import sqlite3

location = 'data'
table_name = 'table_name'

conn = sqlite3.connect(location)
c = conn.cursor()

sql = 'create table if not exists ' + table_name + ' (id integer)'
c.execute(sql)

sql = 'drop table ' + table_name
c.execute(sql)

sql = 'create table if not exists ' + table_name + ' (id integer)'
c.execute(sql)

sql = 'insert into ' + table_name + ' (id) values (%d)' % (1)
c.execute(sql)
conn.commit()

To fix that, you have to close and reconnect to the db after creating or dropping the table, i.e., add the following code in between:

c.close()
conn.close()
conn = sqlite3.connect(location)
c = conn.cursor()

Not sure what is the cause though.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the simple script and the solution. I have tried to just type those statements in the sqlite console, it is OK. I just wonder it should be a bug of pysqlite library. – xiao 啸 Apr 27 '11 at 11:02
1  
btw, you should not need to commit after running DDL, these statements do not run in transactions. – jsw Apr 27 '11 at 11:21
    
@jsw, you are right. Fixed. – Wang Dingwei Apr 27 '11 at 14:51
    
Yep, it works now. Thanks a bunch! – hippocrates Apr 27 '11 at 20:45
    
I just ran into a very similar issue and closing and recreating the connection in code resolves it. Thanks to you both. Its strange that this is happening though. My best guess is its a bug in sqlLite. – TimothyAWiseman Jun 7 '12 at 10:26

I tried exactly the same program and succeeded with no problem at all, only changing the location to :memory:

EDIT: tried exactly the same code and no problem at all, too.

FYI:

felix@felix-arch ~ $ python2 --version
Python 2.7.1

felix@felix-arch ~ $ sqlite3 --version
3.7.6.1

Maybe you should double check the writability of file data?

share|improve this answer
3  
The problem is repeatable. Try not using :memory: – jsw Apr 27 '11 at 9:38
    
Okay now I tried changing location to data and tried again and again , no problem at all, output remains: Inserted 1 – Felix Yan Apr 27 '11 at 9:40
    
I take it that you ran the script twice as mentioned in the question? – jsw Apr 27 '11 at 9:42
    
Yes exactly the same one. – Felix Yan Apr 27 '11 at 9:44
    
okay, well I do get the same problem as described. I'll see if I can simplify and see where the problem is – jsw Apr 27 '11 at 9:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.