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(Apologies for the title, but that's about how I feel right now.)

I've recently been given the… opportunity… to completely redesign the layout of a web site I support. In the interest of keeping my CSS simple and my HTML semantic, I decided to use a modified version of the "holy grail" layout (the main difference is moving the right column inside the center column, which simplifies things even further, and making the center column fixed-width).

After a negligible amount of fiddling, I had the new layout working in FF3, Chrome, and Opera, which meant it was time to fire up IE6. Predictably, the layout breaks (the left column was missing entirely). However, I didn't expect it to break quite so spectacularly — I seem to have triggered some kind of rendering bug in IE6 which I can neither isolate nor eliminate.

When adapting the holy grail layout, I had initially omitted the IE6-specific hack it uses, at it isn't (shouldn't be?) needed with the modifications I've made to the right column, as it accounts for that column's width, which doesn't appear at the same level in my layout. Still, adding it back in was my first guess, but it turned out to require a very strange number (246px, which doesn't appear anywhere else in the stylesheet), so I tried resizing the window to make sure it wasn't related to page size. Much to my surprise, the column then leapt ~1000 pixels to the right, well beyond the edge of the page.

Going back and removing the IE6 hack, the same behavior occurs when resizing, only instead of leaping from the left-hand side of the layout off of the page, it appears out of nowhere at the right-hand side of the layout. I've monkeyed with every part of the layout which seems even remotely related and Googled up all the IE6 rendering bugs I know of, but can't seem to eliminate the jump-on-page-resize behavior.

Has anyone seen this bug before, if bug it is? Complete code follows:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>Modified grail layout</title>

        <style type="text/css">
            * {
                border: 0;
                margin: 0;
                padding: 0;
            }

            #main {
                background: white;
                overflow: auto;
                padding-left: 180px;
            }

            #content {
                background: #dfd;
                float: left;
                padding: 10px 10px 0;
                width: 800px;
            }

            #left {
                background: #ccc;
                float: left;
                margin-left: -100%;
                position: relative;
                padding: 10px 10px 0;
                right: 180px;
                width: 160px;
            }

            #right {
                background: #fdd;
                float: right;
                margin-bottom: 10px;
                padding: 10px 10px 0;
                width: 160px;
            }

            #top {
                margin: 0 auto;
                width: 1000px;
            }

            body {
                background: #ddf;
            }

            /* fake content */

            #cc1 {
                height: 320px;
                width: 800px;
            }

            #cc2 {
                height: 320px;
                margin-right: 190px;
            }

            #cc3 {
                height: 160px;
                margin-right: 190px;
            }

            #lc1 {
                height: 120px;
                margin-left: auto;
                margin-right: auto;
                width: 144px;
            }

            #lc2 {
                height: 300px;
                width: 160px;
            }

            #lc3 {
                height: 400px;
                width: 160px;
            }

            #rc1 {
                height: 400px;
                width: 160px;
            }

            #rc2 {
                height: 300px;
                width: 160px;
            }

            div.fake-content {
                background: #666;
                color: white;
                margin-bottom: 10px;
            }

            /* Internet Explorer (all) */

            #ie body {
                text-align: center;
            }

            #ie #left {
                text-align: center;
            }

            #ie #left * {
                text-align: left;
            }

            #ie #right {
                margin-bottom: 0;
            }

            #ie #top {
                text-align: left;
            }

            /* Internet Explorer 6 */

            #ie6 #left {
                left: 246px; /* WTF!? */
            }
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <!--[if IE 6]><div id="ie"><div id="ie6"><![endif]-->
        <!--[if IE 7]><div id="ie"><div id="ie7"><![endif]-->
        <!--[if IE 8]><div id="ie"><div id="ie8"><![endif]-->

        <div id="top">
            <div id="main">
                <div id="content">
                    <div id="cc1" class="fake-content">cc1</div>

                    <div id="right">
                        <div id="rc1" class="fake-content">rc1</div>
                        <div id="rc2" class="fake-content">rc2</div>
                    </div>

                    <div id="cc2" class="fake-content">cc2</div>
                    <div id="cc3" class="fake-content">cc3</div>
                </div>

                <div id="left">
                    <div id="lc1" class="fake-content">lc1</div>
                    <div id="lc2" class="fake-content">lc2</div>
                    <div id="lc3" class="fake-content">lc3</div>
                </div>
            </div>

            <p id="footer">&copy;2009 Blah blah blah</p>
        </div>

        <!--[if IE]></div></div><![endif]-->
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
I'm not quite sure why you're using the selector "#ie body" instead of "#ie #body". I'd probably use an id that wasn't the same as an HTML element to avoid confusing myself. –  snippid Feb 24 '09 at 1:56
    
Er… I actually meant to change that (having tripped over it once already). Lemme do that now… –  Ben Blank Feb 24 '09 at 2:01
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Specifying position: relative for #top fixes it in IE6, believe it or not.

See this, these, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
It does indeed! I still wish I knew where 246px came from, but so long as I don't have to worry any more about IE6, I think I'm good… ;-) –  Ben Blank Feb 24 '09 at 16:31
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That's why I say tables are not evil! As long as you don't use them in hackish ways (like people used to do back in 2000), they're perfect for layout.

What is the less hackish alternative proposed?
A structure that requires weird hacks that don't even make sense!!

The accepted answer's comment "believe it or not" says it all!

* I'm making this a wiki, in fear of prosecution by css zealots

Check out this answer too:

Vertical centering with css (I like his comments :))

and ..

Give up and use tables!

share|improve this answer
    
I mean no offense, but I can't imagine knowingly doing something wrong just because it's easier. I have some accessibility needs myself, so I don't lightly make my pages less accessible to others. –  Ben Blank Feb 27 '09 at 0:14
    
what makes it wrong exactly? –  hasenj Feb 27 '09 at 2:26
    
Nothing, divs are just more hastle because they hardly ever line up the same. –  Arlen Beiler Jan 26 '10 at 13:06
add comment

Use tables, here is a sample for you:

<html>
<head>
<title>3 column table</title>
</head>
<body>

<table style="width:100%;">
<tr>
<td style="width:20px;border: solid 1px black;">Left column</td>
<td style="border: solid 1px black;">Center Column</td>
<td style="width:20px;border: solid 1px black;">Right column</td>
</tr>
</table>

</body>
</html>

This works, I tested it.

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain the down vote so I can benefit. –  Arlen Beiler Jan 26 '10 at 13:59
    
not my downvote, but people here generally disapprove of tables for formatting. –  Nathan Koop Jan 26 '10 at 14:44
    
Why? they work much better. –  Arlen Beiler Jan 26 '10 at 15:09
5  
tables are for tabular data, not for formatting. –  grapefrukt Jan 26 '10 at 16:09
3  
The problem is that even though tables seem to work better at first, it turns into a real hassle to rearrange, re-style, or sometimes even just edit content on a site that uses tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in tables in ta.... –  aehiilrs Jan 28 '10 at 23:48
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