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Is it possible to do something like this in Python using regular expressions?

Increment every character that is a number in a string by 1

So input "123ab5" would become "234ab6"

I know I could iterate over the string and manually increment each character if it's a number, but this seems unpythonic.

note. This is not homework. I've simplified my problem down to a level that sounds like a homework exercise.

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4  
What happens with a 9? –  eumiro Apr 27 '11 at 8:58
    
is this a homework? –  muhuk Apr 27 '11 at 8:59
    
@eumiro wraps to zero i guess, didn't think of that –  Mike Apr 27 '11 at 9:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
a = "123ab5"

b = ''.join(map(lambda x: str(int(x) + 1) if x.isdigit() else x, a))

or:

b = ''.join(str(int(x) + 1) if x.isdigit() else x for x in a)

or:

import string
b = a.translate(string.maketrans('0123456789', '1234567890'))

In any of these cases:

# b == "234ab6"

EDIT - the first two map 9 to a 10, the last one wraps it to 0. To wrap the first two into zero, you will have to replace str(int(x) + 1) with str((int(x) + 1) % 10)

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+1 for using translateand maketrans –  Ocaso Protal Apr 27 '11 at 9:07

>>> test = '123ab5'
>>> def f(x):
        try:
            return str(int(x)+1)
        except ValueError:
            return x
 >>> ''.join(map(f,test))
     '234ab6'

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ops, same solution.. i think you was faster than me –  nkint Apr 27 '11 at 9:12
>>> a = "123ab5"
>>> def foo(n):
...     try: n = int(n)+1
...     except ValueError: pass
...     return str(n)
... 
>>> a = ''.join(map(foo, a))
>>> a
'234ab6'

by the way with a simple if or with try-catch eumiro solution with join+map is the more pythonic solution for me too

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