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Is there a way to get a list of all Actions Methods of my MVC 3 project?

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At runtime or in VS? –  Richard Apr 27 '11 at 9:08
    
Do you mean Actions or Views? If you mean Views do you include Partial views? Also which viewengine? If you're using the default then you could use reflection to get a list of every class in your assembly/namespace that inherits from System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage or ViewPage<T>. Actions you can do the same kind of thing - use reflection to identify all the classes inheriting from Controller and all their public methods that return an ActionResult derivative. –  RichardW1001 Apr 27 '11 at 9:20
    
I want the Actions in VS –  Mats Hofman Apr 27 '11 at 9:44
1  
Please update the question with that additional information. –  Richard Apr 27 '11 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

This will give you a dictionary with the controller type as key and an IEnumerable of its MethodInfos as value.

        var assemblies = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies(); // currently loaded assemblies
        var controllerTypes = assemblies
            .SelectMany(a => a.GetTypes())
            .Where(t => t != null
                && t.IsPublic // public controllers only
                && t.Name.EndsWith("Controller", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) // enfore naming convention
                && !t.IsAbstract // no abstract controllers
                && typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(t)); // should implement IController (happens automatically when you extend Controller)
        var controllerMethods = controllerTypes.ToDictionary(
            controllerType => controllerType,
            controllerType => controllerType.GetMethods(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance).Where(m => typeof(ActionResult).IsAssignableFrom(m.ReturnType)));

It looks in more than just the current assembly and it will also return methods that, for example, return JsonResult instead of ActionResult. (JsonResult actually inherits from ActionResult)

Edit: For Web API support

Change

&& typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(t)); // should implement IController (happens automatically when you extend Controller)

to

&& typeof(IHttpController).IsAssignableFrom(t)); // should implement IHttpController (happens automatically when you extend ApiController)

and remove this:

.Where(m => typeof(ActionResult).IsAssignableFrom(m.ReturnType))

Because Web API methods can return just about anything. (POCO's, HttpResponseMessage, ...)

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+1 for a method that returns more details (I like how it groups the 'Actions' with their respective 'Controllers') –  JakeJ Oct 7 '13 at 22:42

You can use this to reflect over the assemblies at runtime to produce a list of methods in Controllers that return ActionResult:

    public IEnumerable<MethodInfo> GetMvcActionMethods()
    {
        return
            Directory.GetFiles(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location)
                .Select(Assembly.LoadFile)
                .SelectMany(
                    assembly =>
                    assembly.GetTypes()
                            .Where(t => typeof (Controller).IsAssignableFrom(t))
                            .SelectMany(type => (from action in type.GetMethods(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance) 
                                                 where action.ReturnType == typeof(ActionResult) 
                                                 select action)
                                        )
                    );
    }

This will give you the actions, but not the list of Views (i.e. it won't work if you can use different views in each action)

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1  
This method will not include action methods that return "FileContentResult", "JsonResult", ... See my response below –  Moeri Jun 11 '13 at 13:04

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