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In the below shown piece of code, I understand that one of "none", "monitor" or "gdb" set to debug, but I just can't understand the syntax. I have just started learning Perl. Can anyone explain me how does this syntax work?

GetOptions ("debug=s" => sub { set_debug ($_[1]) },
            "no-debug" => sub { set_debug ("none") },
            "monitor" => sub { set_debug ("monitor") },
            "gdb" => sub { set_debug ("gdb") }
           );

Thanks.

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2  
I can see half a dozen different kinds of syntax there. Can you be more specific about what you don't understand? –  Quentin Apr 27 '11 at 9:14
    
Firstly, "debug=s" is this the default assignment? Second, use of "sub" keyword, I just guess its used to call the set_debug function? Then at last how are "no-debug", "monitor" and "gdb" compared and set. Its all confusing to me. –  hue Apr 27 '11 at 9:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Firstly, "debug=s" is this the default assignment?

The naming conventions used for keys in the hash passed to GetOptions is explained in the documentation for GetOptions.

Second, use of "sub" keyword, I just guess its used to call the set_debug function?

No. It defines a subroutine and passes it as the value to whatever key is on the left hand side of the fat comma. It is called when the augment is set (this is also defined in the GetOptions docs).

Then at last how are "no-debug", "monitor" and "gdb" compared and set.

When the matching command line argument is provided, the subroutine is executed.

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Thanks David, that was really helpful. –  hue Apr 27 '11 at 11:17
    
Clarification - sub keyword returns a REFERENCE to a subroutine, not the subroutine itself, which is assigned as a value of the hash –  DVK Apr 28 '11 at 2:02

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