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I'm using Tomcat 6.0.29, with Tomcat 7's connection pool and MySQL. Testing my application, it doesn't reuse anything from the pool, but ends up creating a new pool, to eventually where I cannot use the database because there are hundreds of sleeping connections in the pool when the max active size for the pool is set to 20.

See here for reference:

+----+------+-----------------+--------+---------+------+-------+------------------+
| Id | User | Host            | db     | Command | Time | State | Info             |
+----+------+-----------------+--------+---------+------+-------+------------------+
|  2 | root | localhost:51877 | dbname | Sleep   |    9 |       | NULL             |
|  4 | root | localhost       | NULL   | Query   |    0 | NULL  | show processlist |
|  5 | root | localhost:49213 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
|  6 | root | localhost:53492 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
|  7 | root | localhost:46012 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
|  8 | root | localhost:34964 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
|  9 | root | localhost:52728 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
| 10 | root | localhost:43782 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
| 11 | root | localhost:38468 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
| 12 | root | localhost:48021 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
| 13 | root | localhost:54854 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
| 14 | root | localhost:41520 | dbname | Sleep   |   21 |       | NULL             |
| 15 | root | localhost:38112 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 16 | root | localhost:39168 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 17 | root | localhost:40427 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 18 | root | localhost:58179 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 19 | root | localhost:40957 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 20 | root | localhost:45567 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 21 | root | localhost:48314 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 22 | root | localhost:34546 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 23 | root | localhost:44928 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 24 | root | localhost:57320 | dbname | Sleep   |   13 |       | NULL             |
| 25 | root | localhost:54643 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 26 | root | localhost:49809 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 27 | root | localhost:60993 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 28 | root | localhost:36676 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 29 | root | localhost:53574 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 30 | root | localhost:45402 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 31 | root | localhost:37632 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 32 | root | localhost:56561 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 33 | root | localhost:34261 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 34 | root | localhost:55221 | dbname | Sleep   |   29 |       | NULL             |
| 35 | root | localhost:39613 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 36 | root | localhost:52908 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 37 | root | localhost:56401 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 38 | root | localhost:44446 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 39 | root | localhost:57567 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 40 | root | localhost:56445 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 41 | root | localhost:39616 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 42 | root | localhost:49197 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 43 | root | localhost:59916 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 44 | root | localhost:37165 | dbname | Sleep   |   15 |       | NULL             |
| 45 | root | localhost:45649 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 46 | root | localhost:55397 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 47 | root | localhost:34322 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 48 | root | localhost:54387 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 49 | root | localhost:55147 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 50 | root | localhost:47280 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 51 | root | localhost:56856 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 52 | root | localhost:58369 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 53 | root | localhost:33712 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 54 | root | localhost:44315 | dbname | Sleep   |    1 |       | NULL             |
| 55 | root | localhost:54649 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 56 | root | localhost:41202 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 57 | root | localhost:59393 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 58 | root | localhost:38304 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 59 | root | localhost:34548 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 60 | root | localhost:49567 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 61 | root | localhost:48077 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 62 | root | localhost:48586 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 63 | root | localhost:45308 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |
| 64 | root | localhost:43169 | dbname | Sleep   |   14 |       | NULL             |

It creates exactly 10 for each request, which is the minIdle & InitialSize attribute as seen below.

Here is the sample test code embedded into a jsp page. The code is not the code in my application and just used to see if the issue was with my code, but the problem still persisted.

Context envCtx;
envCtx = (Context) new InitialContext().lookup("java:comp/env");
DataSource datasource = (DataSource) envCtx.lookup("jdbc/dbname");
Connection con = null;

try {
  con = datasource.getConnection();
  Statement st = con.createStatement();
  ResultSet rs = st.executeQuery("select * from UserAccount");
  int cnt = 1;
  while (rs.next()) {
      out.println((cnt++)+". Token:" +rs.getString("UserToken")+
        " FirstName:"+rs.getString("FirstName")+" LastName:"+rs.getString("LastName"));
  }
  rs.close();
  st.close();
} finally {
  if (con!=null) try {con.close();}catch (Exception ignore) {}
}

Here is my context.xml file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Context>
    <Resource name="jdbc/dbname" 
              auth="Container" 
              type="javax.sql.DataSource" 
              factory="org.apache.tomcat.jdbc.pool.DataSourceFactory"
              testWhileIdle="true"
              testOnBorrow="true"
              testOnReturn="false"
              validationQuery="SELECT 1"
              validationInterval="30000"
              timeBetweenEvictionRunsMillis="30000"
              maxActive="20" 
              minIdle="10" 
              maxWait="10000" 
              initialSize="10"
              removeAbandonedTimeout="60"
              removeAbandoned="true"
              logAbandoned="true"
              minEvictableIdleTimeMillis="30000" 
              jmxEnabled="true"
              jdbcInterceptors=
"org.apache.tomcat.jdbc.pool.interceptor.ConnectionState;org.apache.tomcat.jdbc.pool.interceptor.StatementFinalizer"
              username="" 
              password="" 
              driverClassName="com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"
              url="jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/dbname?autoReconnect=true&amp;useUnicode=true&amp;characterEncoding=utf8"/>

<WatchedResource>WEB-INF/web.xml</WatchedResource>
<WatchedResource>META-INF/context.xml</WatchedResource>
</Context>

I'm sure I can use removeAbandonedTimeout to a low number and it would purge all these sleeping connections, but that wouldn't fix the real problem would it? Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong? Thank you very much.

share|improve this question
    
Is your code in the try/catch throwing any exception? At the moment, you're just ignoring and possible output. –  Mikaveli Apr 27 '11 at 9:57
    
That's just copy pasted from apache's tomcat connection pool documentation. My application which has normal try catch statements isn't throwing any exceptions despite this problem occurring. –  meatyowllegs Apr 27 '11 at 15:51
    
is this happening in your dev environment or anywhere where you have hot deploy and/or redeploy your war? –  Augusto Apr 28 '11 at 12:20
    
Did you ever solve this? We're seeing the same thing with Oracle, with the connection pool set up in the server's context.xml. –  Paul Dec 7 '11 at 22:23
1  
You should re-test this with creating only one InitialContext ever in your application, (and possibly only one envCtx.lookup()) , (i.e. only do the 2 and/or 3 first lines in this code once , not for every requests) –  nos Dec 23 '11 at 19:07
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5 Answers

I don't have an environment to test this in, at the moment, however, I believe that you should be closing your Connection, Statement, and ResultSet after each query; if any of these leak, it could leave the Connection hanging in an idle (but not necessarily returned to the pool) state.

The Connection object you receive should actually be a sort of proxy from the pooling layer; calling close on it releases your "reservation" on that connection and returns it to the pool. (It will not necessarily close the underlying, actual database connection.)

Because it could be remaining open (usually will be), unclosed Statements or ResultSets could be interpreted by the pool layer as an indication of being still “busy.”

You may be able to inspect (e.g. debugger makes this easy) the Connection object to identify its state at run-time, to confirm this.

For simplicity (…) we used the following nasty little routine in the finally blocks after every database connection call: … finally { closeAll (rs, st, con); }, ensuring that they would fall out of context immediately.

    /**
 * Close a bunch of things carefully, ignoring exceptions. The
 * “things” supported, thus far, are:
 * <ul>
 * <li>JDBC ResultSet</li>
 * <li>JDBC Statement</li>
 * <li>JDBC Connection</li>
 * <li>Lock:s</li>
 * </ul>
 * <p>
 * This is mostly meant for “finally” clauses.
 *
 * @param things A set of SQL statements, result sets, and database
 *            connections
 */
public static void closeAll (final Object... things) {
    for (final Object thing : things) {
        if (null != thing) {
            try {
                if (thing instanceof ResultSet) {
                    try {
                        ((ResultSet) thing).close ();
                    } catch (final SQLException e) {
                        /* No Op */
                    }
                }
                if (thing instanceof Statement) {
                    try {
                        ((Statement) thing).close ();
                    } catch (final SQLException e) {
                        /* No Op */
                    }
                }
                if (thing instanceof Connection) {
                    try {
                        ((Connection) thing).close ();
                    } catch (final SQLException e) {
                        /* No Op */
                    }
                }
                if (thing instanceof Lock) {
                    try {
                        ((Lock) thing).unlock ();
                    } catch (final IllegalMonitorStateException e) {
                        /* No Op */
                    }
                }
            } catch (final RuntimeException e) {
                /* No Op */
            }
        }
    }
}

This was just syntactic sugar to ensure that nobody forgot to put in the longer, uglier stanza of if (null != con) { try { con.close () } catch (SQLException e) {} } (usually repeated three times for ResultSet, Statement, and Connection); and removed the "visual noise" of what our formatter would turn into a full screen of incidental cleanup code on every block of code that touched the database.

(The Lock support in there was for some related, but nasty, deadlock states on potential exceptions, that didn't have much to do with the database at all, but we used in a similar way to reduce the line noise in some thread-synchronization code. This is from an MMO server that might have 4,000 active threads at a time trying to manipulate game objects and SQL tables.)

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+1 You absolutely have to close the connection to release it to the connection pool –  Sripathi Krishnan Dec 29 '11 at 20:23
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Look into the maxAge property of the Connection pool. ( I noticed you didn't have it set.)

maxAge is

Time in milliseconds to keep this connection. When a connection is returned to the pool, the pool will check to see if the now - time-when-connected > maxAge has been reached, and if so, it closes the connection rather than returning it to the pool. The default value is 0, which implies that connections will be left open and no age check will be done upon returning the connection to the pool. [source]

Basically this allows your sleeping threads to be recovered and should solve your problem.

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perhaps this note from the dbcp connection pool docs may be the answer:

NOTE: If maxIdle is set too low on heavily loaded systems it is possible you will see connections being closed and almost immediately new connections being opened. This is a result of the active threads momentarily closing connections faster than they are opening them, causing the number of idle connections to rise above maxIdle. The best value for maxIdle for heavily loaded system will vary but the default is a good starting point.

perhaps maxIdle should == maxActive + minIdle for your system.

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You should try with a connection provider, create a class which will contain your datasource provider declared as static instead of looking for it every call. Same for your InitialContext. Maybe it's because you create a new instance each time.

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A short note on your code: not only Connection, but the ResultSet and Statement should be closed in the Finally block as well. The method given by BRPocock should work fine.

But that is not the actual reason for your 10 connections per request! The reason you get 10 connections each request is because you have set minIdle to 10, meaning that you force each DataSource to have 10 connections when you create it. (Try to set minIdle to 5, and you see that you will have 5 connections per request.)

The problem in your case is, that every time you do a request, you create a new DataSource:

DataSource datasource = (DataSource) envCtx.lookup("jdbc/dbname");

I'm not sure how the lookup exactly works, but given your processlist from mysql i'm pretty convinced that for every request you create a new datasource. If you have a Java Servlet, then you should create the DataSource in the init() method of your main Servlet. From there you can then get connections from it.

In my case I did something else, because I have multiple DataSources (multiple databases) I use the following code to get my datasource:

private DataSource getDataSource(String db, String user, String pass)
{
    for(Map.Entry<String, DataSource> entry : datasources.entrySet())
    {
        DataSource ds = entry.getValue();
        if(db.equals(ds.getPoolProperties().getUrl()))
        {
            return ds;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("NEW DATASOURCE CREATED ON REQUEST: " + db);

    DataSource ds = new DataSource(initPoolProperties(db, user, pass));
    datasources.put(db, ds);
    return ds;
}

The datasource relies on an equals method which is not really fast, but yea it works. I just keep a global HashMap containing my datasources, and if I request a datasource that does not exist yet, I create a new one. I know this works very well because in the logs I only see the NEW DATASOURCE CREATED ON REQUEST: dbname message only once per database, even multiple clients use the same datasource.

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