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I've had a couple of discussions with a co-worker about the use of single letter variable names in certain circumstances inside our codebase, at which we both disagree.

He favours more verbose naming convention for these, and I do not.

There are three scenarios in my opinion where I use single letter variable names:

  • Loops - i for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { ... }
  • Lambda expressions in C# - x/y/z: .Where(x => x == 5)
  • Exceptions - e: try { ... } catch(ExceptionType e) { /* usage of 'e' */ }

These are the only scenarios where I would use it, and I obviously use more verbose naming conventions elsewhere.

My colleague put forward the following arguments for exceptions and loops:

  • i - it doesn't mean anything.
  • e - it's the most common letter in the English language. If you wanted to search the solution for exceptions, you'd find lots of undesired instances of e.

I accept these arguments, but have retorts that, if one does not know what i means in a for loop, then they probably shouldn't be a programmer. It's a very common term for loops and exceptions, as is e. I have also mentioned that, if one wanted, they could search for catch in the case of the exception.

I realise that this is subjective, but then, one could argue that coding standards are just that - opinions, albeit opinions by academics.

I would be happy either way, and will forward the results to him, but would rather that we (our company) continue to use a single coding standard, rather than have two developers with different opinions on what to use.

Thanks in advance.

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Good question, but perhaps more suited to programmers.stackexchange.com ? –  Paul R Apr 27 '11 at 10:10
    
@Paul R: Thanks! I have just re-raised it here - programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/71710/…. This question can be flagged to be closed, but to be honest, I think it's still valid here on SO. –  Dan Atkinson Apr 27 '11 at 10:12
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If you wanted to search the solution for exceptions, you'd find lots of undesired instances of e. Why would you search for instances of a type by guessing variable names?! –  fearofawhackplanet Apr 27 '11 at 10:12
    
@fearofawhackplanet: I also asked this question, and countered with 'search for catch instead`. –  Dan Atkinson Apr 27 '11 at 10:14
    
Whats wrong with just searching for Exception? –  fearofawhackplanet Apr 27 '11 at 10:16
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

i doesn't mean anything

Yes it does. It's the index in a for loop or counter.

e is the most common letter in the English language. If you wanted to search the solution for exceptions, you'd find lots of undesired instances of e

This just doesn't even make any sense. Why would you search for e if you wanted to find instances of Exception?

Serioulsy, I'd just laugh at anyone who came out with these arguments. Everyone knows what i and e represent in these scenarios. They are universally accepted conventions. It sounds to me like your colleague is just trying to be a smart-ass.

Edit - This question reminded me of this wtf.

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If the lexical scope of a variable is more than 20 or 25 lines, then the variable should probably not have a single letter name. If a large number of variables in your code base have a lexical scope larger than 25 lines (or so), then your code base has a much bigger problem than can be dealt with by using a verbose naming convention.

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Another exception to the rule that I apply is naming of exception variables that need to be thrown. For instance, the code should read:

Exception yourToys = new Exception(...);
throw yourToys;

or

Exception up_in_a_bucket = new Exception(...);
throw up_in_a_bucket;
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