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I have a little "floating tool box" - a div with position:fixed; overflow:auto. Works just fine.

But when scrolling inside that box (with the mouse wheel) and reaching the bottom OR top, the parent element "takes over" the "scroll request" : The document behind the tool box scrolls.
- Which is annoying and not what the user "asked for".

I'm using jQuery and thoght I could stop this behaviour with event.stoppropagation():
$("#toolBox").scroll( function(event){ event.stoppropagation() });

It does enter the function, but still, propagation happens anyway (the document scrolls)
- It's surprisingly hard to search for this topic on SO (and Google), so I have to ask:
How to prevent propagation / bubbling of the scroll-event ?

Edit:
Working solution thanks to amustill (and Brandon Aaron for the mousewheel-plugin here:
https://github.com/brandonaaron/jquery-mousewheel/raw/master/jquery.mousewheel.js

$(".ToolPage").bind('mousewheel', function(e, d)  
    var t = $(this);
    if (d > 0 && t.scrollTop() === 0) {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
    else {
        if (d < 0 && (t.scrollTop() == t.get(0).scrollHeight - t.innerHeight())) {
            e.preventDefault();
        }
    }
});
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Looks like it might not be possible. stackoverflow.com/questions/1459676/… –  Musaul Apr 27 '11 at 10:35
3  
@Musaul - actually that thread gave 2 possible solutions (if a bit rouge): setting overflow:hidden on the document, when hovering in the toolbox, or saving the documents scrollTop, and forcing it upon the document repeatedly (nice), during toolbox.scroll()... –  T4NK3R Apr 27 '11 at 10:55
1  
Yeah, I meant the scroll event bubbling. But I suppose it gives you workarounds. I'd completely avoid the scroll forcing option though. Doing too much (or anything in complex pages) in the scroll event can make the browser freeze for a while, especially on slower computers. –  Musaul Apr 27 '11 at 11:46
    
This works beautifully in everything other than IE, when attached to the body tag. With the above fix, it seems to disable mousewheel scrolling entirely. –  Matthew Mar 28 '12 at 22:08
    
Please take a look at my answer, @Matthew. It resolves the IE issue, as well as normalizing for FireFox without any plug-ins. –  Troy Alford Jun 13 '13 at 19:57
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13 Answers 13

up vote 33 down vote accepted

It's possible with the use of Brandon Aaron's Mousewheel plugin.

Here's a demo: http://jsbin.com/ixura3/3

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1  
There's also some weirdness if you have scrolling inertia on and scroll a child container and then move your mouse out of the child. The inertia caries onto the parent or any other container. I experienced this on a magic mouse in chrome on OSX Lion –  Jethro Larson Aug 8 '12 at 1:20
3  
the jsbin examples do not prevent page scrolling on an iPad. –  Heraldmonkey Jan 23 '13 at 8:49
2  
@Heraldmonkey I'm aware of this issue. I hope to have time to revise the answer for all browsers and device. –  amustill Jan 23 '13 at 10:34
2  
The jsbin example is not working for me on an osx trackpad –  kevzettler Aug 8 '13 at 18:55
2  
Not working for me on Mac OS X and Chrome 32. –  Mitar Jan 27 at 4:00
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I am adding this answer for completeness because the accepted answer by @amustill does not correctly solve the problem in Internet Explorer. Please see the comments in my original post for details. In addition, this solution does not require any plugins - only jQuery.

In essence, the code works by handling the mousewheel event. Each such event contains a wheelDelta equal to the number of px which it is going to move the scrollable area to. If this value is >0, then we are scrolling up. If the wheelDelta is <0 then we are scrolling down.

FireFox: FireFox uses DOMMouseScroll as the event, and populates originalEvent.detail, whose +/- is reversed from what is described above. It generally returns intervals of 3, while other browsers return scrolling in intervals of 120 (at least on my machine). To correct, we simply detect it and multiply by -40 to normalize.

@amustill's answer works by canceling the event if the <div>'s scrollable area is already either at the top or the bottom maximum position. However, Internet Explorer disregards the canceled event in situations where the delta is larger than the remaining scrollable space.

In other words, if you have a 200px tall <div> containing 500px of scrollable content, and the current scrollTop is 400, a mousewheel event which tells the browser to scroll 120px further will result in both the <div> and the <body> scrolling, because 400 + 120 > 500.

So - to solve the problem, we have to do something slightly different, as shown below:

The requisite jQuery code is:

$(document).on('DOMMouseScroll mousewheel', '.Scrollable', function(ev) {
    var $this = $(this),
        scrollTop = this.scrollTop,
        scrollHeight = this.scrollHeight,
        height = $this.height(),
        delta = (ev.type == 'DOMMouseScroll' ?
            ev.originalEvent.detail * -40 :
            ev.originalEvent.wheelDelta),
        up = delta > 0;

    var prevent = function() {
        ev.stopPropagation();
        ev.preventDefault();
        ev.returnValue = false;
        return false;
    }

    if (!up && -delta > scrollHeight - height - scrollTop) {
        // Scrolling down, but this will take us past the bottom.
        $this.scrollTop(scrollHeight);
        return prevent();
    } else if (up && delta > scrollTop) {
        // Scrolling up, but this will take us past the top.
        $this.scrollTop(0);
        return prevent();
    }
});

In essence, this code cancels any scrolling event which would create the unwanted edge condition, then uses jQuery to set the scrollTop of the <div> to either the maximum or minimum value, depending on which direction the mousewheel event was requesting.

Because the event is canceled entirely in either case, it never propagates to the body at all, and therefore solves the issue in IE, as well as all of the other browsers.

I have also put up a working example on jsFiddle.

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7  
This is, by far, the most comprehensive answer. I made your function into a jQuery extension, so it can be used inline in a jQuery object chain. See this Gist. –  theftprevention Jul 9 '13 at 17:40
2  
Excellent, comprehensive and easy to understand answer. –  David Tuite Oct 21 '13 at 11:57
1  
This works very well, but there seems to be an inertia problem when scrolling really fast. The page is still scrolled by about 20 pixels, which is not too bad. –  juminoz Dec 20 '13 at 22:00
1  
There should be $this.scrollTop(scrollHeight - height); for the first case. –  Mitar Jan 27 at 5:03
1  
This worked out great for me. But for some reason it does not work on iFrames in IE. At least that's what it looks like to me. Here's a fiddle of the issue: jsfiddle.net/4wrxq/84 I've experienced this issue in IE9 and IE10. It works fine in Chrome. –  jimmykup Mar 11 at 20:41
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I know it's quite an old question, but since this is one of top results in google... I had to somehow cancel scroll bubbling without jQuery and this code works for me:

function preventDefault(e) {
  e = e || window.event;
  if (e.preventDefault)
    e.preventDefault();
  e.returnValue = false;  
}

document.getElementById('a').onmousewheel = function(e) { 
  document.getElementById('a').scrollTop -= e. wheelDeltaY; 
  preventDefault(e);
}
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2  
interesting idea, ..the mousewheel event is not cross-browser though, and the scroll distance needs to be normalised, see stackoverflow.com/a/5542105/126600 –  zack Jul 25 '12 at 16:53
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For AngularJS, I defined the following directive:

module.directive('isolateScrolling', function () {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function (scope, element, attr) {
      element.bind('mousewheel', function (e) {
        if ((e.deltaY > 0 && this.clientHeight + this.scrollTop == this.scrollHeight) ||
            (e.deltaY < 0 && this.scrollTop == 0)) {
          e.stopPropagation();
          e.preventDefault();
          return false;
        }

        return true;
      });
    }
  };
});

And then added it to the scrollable element (the dropdown-menu ul):

<div class="dropdown">
  <button type="button" class="btn dropdown-toggle">Rename <span class="caret"></span></button>
  <ul class="dropdown-menu" isolate-scrolling>
    <li ng-repeat="s in savedSettings | objectToArray | orderBy:'name' track by s.name">
      <a ng-click="renameSettings(s.name)">{{s.name}}</a>
    </li>
  </ul>
</div>

Only tested on Chrome. There are probably some hacks required for differing event names and access to the element scroll position and mouse wheel delta on other browsers.

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This does not appear to be working in Chrome 34. The binding is firing, but the page continues to scroll when the <ul> reaches the bottom. –  Evil Closet Monkey May 20 at 17:01
    
It's working for me in Chrome 36. –  dOxxx Jun 8 at 0:35
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amustill's answer as a knockout handler:

ko.bindingHandlers.preventParentScroll = {
    init: function (element, valueAccessor, allBindingsAccessor, context) {
        $(element).mousewheel(function (e, d) {
            var t = $(this);
            if (d > 0 && t.scrollTop() === 0) {
                e.preventDefault();
            }
            else {
                if (d < 0 && (t.scrollTop() == t.get(0).scrollHeight - t.innerHeight())) {
                    e.preventDefault();
                }
            }
        });
    }
};
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Using native element scroll properties with the delta value from the mousewheel plugin:

$elem.on('mousewheel', function (e, delta) {
    // Restricts mouse scrolling to the scrolling range of this element.
    if (
        this.scrollTop < 1 && delta > 0 ||
        (this.clientHeight + this.scrollTop) === this.scrollHeight && delta < 0
    ) {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
});
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For those using MooTools, here is equivalent code:

            'mousewheel': function(event){
            var height = this.getSize().y;
            height -= 2;    // Not sure why I need this bodge
            if ((this.scrollTop === (this.scrollHeight - height) && event.wheel < 0) || 
                (this.scrollTop === 0 && event.wheel > 0)) {
                event.preventDefault();
            }

Bear in mind that I, like some others, had to tweak a value by a couple of px, that is what the height -= 2 is for.

Basically the main difference is that in MooTools, the delta info comes from event.wheel instead of an extra parameter passed to the event.

Also, I had problems if I bound this code to anything (event.target.scrollHeight for a bound function does not equal this.scrollHeight for a non-bound one)

Hope this helps someone as much as this post helped me ;)

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my jQuery plugin:

$('.child').dontScrollParent();

$.fn.dontScrollParent = function()
{
    this.bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll',function(e)
    {
        var delta = e.originalEvent.wheelDelta || -e.originalEvent.detail;

        if (delta > 0 && $(this).scrollTop() <= 0)
            return false;
        if (delta < 0 && $(this).scrollTop() >= this.scrollHeight - $(this).height())
            return false;

        return true;
    });
}
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This doesn't seem to work in Firefox. –  Tyson Cadenhead Apr 16 '13 at 12:19
    
..what version? –  psycho brm Apr 16 '13 at 15:16
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I hate necro posting but I was searching for this for MooTools and this was the first that came up. The original MooTools example would work with scrolling up, but not scrolling down so I decided to write this one.


var stopScroll = function (e) {
    var scrollTo = null;
    if (e.event.type === 'mousewheel') {
        scrollTo = (e.event.wheelDelta * -1);
    } else if (e.event.type === 'DOMMouseScroll') {
        scrollTo = 40 * e.event.detail;
    }
    if (scrollTo) {
        e.preventDefault();
        this.scrollTo(0, scrollTo + this.scrollTop);
    }
    return false;
};

Usage:

(function)($){
    window.addEvent('domready', function(){
        $$('.scrollable').addEvents({
             'mousewheel': stopScroll,
             'DOMMouseScroll': stopScroll
        });
    });
})(document.id);
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The best solution I could find was listening to the scroll event on the window and set the scrollTop to the previous scrollTop if the child div was visible.

prevScrollPos = 0
$(window).scroll (ev) ->
    if $('#mydiv').is(':visible')
        document.body.scrollTop = prevScrollPos
    else
        prevScrollPos = document.body.scrollTop

There is a flicker in the background of the child div if you fire a lot of scroll events, so this could be tweaked, but it is hardly noticed and it was sufficient for my use case.

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It can be done easily by CSS and Javascript, by fixing the background when mouse hovers the foreground :

function onMouseOverBrowseScreen(over){
   document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0].style.overflowY = (over?"hidden":"scroll");
   document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].style.position = (over?"fixed":"static");
   document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].style.height = (over?"100%":"auto");
}  

Inspired by this answer : Prevent body scrolling but ALLOW overlay scrolling

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You can try it this way:

$('#element').on('shown', function(){ 
   $('body').css('overflow-y', 'hidden');
   $('body').css('margin-left', '-17px');
});

$('#element').on('hide', function(){ 
   $('body').css('overflow-y', 'scroll');
   $('body').css('margin-left', '0px');
});
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jQuery plugin with emulate natural scrolling for Internet Explorer

  $.fn.mousewheelStopPropagation = function(options) {
    options = $.extend({
        // defaults
        wheelstop: null // Function
        }, options);

    // Compatibilities
    var isMsIE = ('Microsoft Internet Explorer' === navigator.appName);
    var docElt = document.documentElement,
        mousewheelEventName = 'mousewheel';
    if('onmousewheel' in docElt) {
        mousewheelEventName = 'mousewheel';
    } else if('onwheel' in docElt) {
        mousewheelEventName = 'wheel';
    } else if('DOMMouseScroll' in docElt) {
        mousewheelEventName = 'DOMMouseScroll';
    }
    if(!mousewheelEventName) { return this; }

    function mousewheelPrevent(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
        event.stopPropagation();
        if('function' === typeof options.wheelstop) {
            options.wheelstop(event);
        }
    }

    return this.each(function() {
        var _this = this,
            $this = $(_this);
        $this.on(mousewheelEventName, function(event) {
            var origiEvent = event.originalEvent;
            var scrollTop = _this.scrollTop,
                scrollMax = _this.scrollHeight - $this.outerHeight(),
                delta = -origiEvent.wheelDelta;
            if(isNaN(delta)) {
                delta = origiEvent.deltaY;
            }
            var scrollUp = delta < 0;
            if((scrollUp && scrollTop <= 0) || (!scrollUp && scrollTop >= scrollMax)) {
                mousewheelPrevent(event);
            } else if(isMsIE) {
                // Fix Internet Explorer and emulate natural scrolling
                var animOpt = { duration:200, easing:'linear' };
                if(scrollUp && -delta > scrollTop) {
                    $this.stop(true).animate({ scrollTop:0 }, animOpt);
                    mousewheelPrevent(event);
                } else if(!scrollUp && delta > scrollMax - scrollTop) {
                    $this.stop(true).animate({ scrollTop:scrollMax }, animOpt);
                    mousewheelPrevent(event);
                }
            }
        });
    });
};

https://github.com/basselin/jquery-mousewheel-stop-propagation/blob/master/mousewheelStopPropagation.js

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1  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Radim Köhler Feb 2 at 9:03
    
It's corrected. –  bigBen Feb 2 at 10:52
    
Great job Tiben. Thanks for that, really. +1 for the effort –  Radim Köhler Feb 2 at 10:52
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