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My class looks very similar to this:

[Serializable]
class ExampleClass {
    public bool Value { get; set; }
    public string Names { get; set; }
}

I would like to serialize it to this: for Value == true :

<ExampleClass>
   <Value>
   <Names>SomeName</Names>
</ExampleClass>

and for Value == false :

<ExampleClass>
   <Value/>
   <Names>SomeName</Names>
</ExampleClass>

As you can see for Value==true we get an opening tag and no attributes. In case when Value is false we get only closing tag.

How can I achieve this with c# serialization?

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6  
So you want invalid XML when Value==true ? –  Henk Holterman Apr 27 '11 at 10:47
    
"In case when Value is false we get only closing tag." - In your example, you've given <Value/>, which is not a closing tag, it is an empty tag. </Value> would be a closing tag. –  Jaymz Apr 27 '11 at 10:50
    
yup - that's right –  Gawi Apr 27 '11 at 10:50
    
Jaymz - I see the difference now, but still no idea how to do this. –  Gawi Apr 27 '11 at 10:52
1  
@Gawi, what's wrong with <Value>True</Value> or <Value>False</Value>? It's valid XML, it's human readable, it matches with the rest of the document's style. I see only advantages. Why not go this way? –  Bazzz Apr 27 '11 at 10:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You seem to want invalid XML.

No tool or API will let you do that, you'll have to write your own XML using a TextWriter.

The best advice of course is not to do this. Rethink your solution.

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-1. Iti sno the "old SOAP formatting, it is the old serializer and it has a significant amount of advantages to the new one. They pretty much both are not handling all possible cases, with different weak areas. I use the XmlSerializer a LOT and nowhere close to SOAP. –  TomTom Apr 27 '11 at 10:58
    
TomTom, I revised the answer but the [Serializer] is old. It might still have some uses but also unresolved issues. And I always see SOAPFormatters lying around... –  Henk Holterman Apr 27 '11 at 11:00
    
it's not that I want this type of invalid xml, Protocol which I'm using wants it that way –  Gawi Apr 27 '11 at 11:01
1  
@gawi: have you double-checked, it seems unlikely. If it's true, kick the makers of that protocol. Hard. –  Henk Holterman Apr 27 '11 at 11:04
    
In Gawi's defense, there are a lot of crappy XML interfaces out in the world, sometimes you get asked to produce weird things and you can't go and kick the makers. –  codeulike Apr 27 '11 at 11:08

Could I ask why you want to deliberately misuse the .NET libraries? As has been mentioned, what you're asking for is invalid XML, and most classes you'll find in the framework are specifically designed to avoid mistakes like mismatched tags. So the likely answer is, you can't.

Someone can probably find you a better solution if you describe the problem in more detail.

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it's not that I want this type of invalid xml, Protocol which I'm using wants it that way –  Gawi Apr 27 '11 at 11:03
1  
Are you really sure the protocol is using invalid XML? This seems more than a bit odd. Double-check? Otherwise you may have to write the "XML" by hand to a file/stream, as plain text. –  Jakob Möllås Apr 27 '11 at 11:17
    
yes I checked it - proof : <Phone> <Number>600123456</Number> <DefaultNo/> </Phone> –  Gawi Apr 27 '11 at 11:25
1  
That snippet is valid. <DefaultNo/> is a self-closing tag. <DefaultNo> by itself is not. What is this protocol that checks based on XML well-formedness? It sounds like a mess. –  Tom W Apr 27 '11 at 11:35

As others have said, what you are asking to produce is not valid XML.

I once had to produce an 'xml' file that had a non-printing character in a certain place. Of course, thats not XML, but you still might get asked to do it.

Lets assume that you can't get hold of the people specifying the protocol and call on the wrath of the XML-gods to strike them with lightning.

If you need to produce something that is a-bit-like-xml-but-not-quite, running it through a standard XML serializer into a string variable and then doing a search/replace might be your best option. Something like:

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(someobj.GetType());
string asString = null;
using (StringWriter writer = new StringWriter())
{
    serializer.Serialize(writer, someobj);
    asString = writer.ToString();
}
string weirdXml = asString.Replace("<Value>True</Value>","<Value>").Replace("<Value>False</Value>","<Value/>");

(make sure you pray for forgiveness to the XML-gods each time you compile the code though)

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I have a feeling that all you really asking for is someway to convert an object to XML and you don't really care about the implementing the ISerializable interface.

If that's the case just use TextWriter and write your text file according to your object.

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That was my plan B ;) THX –  Gawi Apr 27 '11 at 11:19

Well, as correctly said by everyone, what you are trying to do in case of value = true is invalid attribute.

Instead, as i assume that you want the value thing to be present in the XML only when it is true, add it as an attribute. or say as an optional attribute. Which is present only when the value is true.

Like : When true,

 <ExampleClass value=true>           
 <Names>SomeName</Names>  
 </ExampleClass>

and when its false

 <ExampleClass >       
 <Names>SomeName</Names> 
 </ExampleClass>

You will have to add the following attributes to the property in class :

 [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlAttributeAttribute()]
 [System.ComponentModel.DefaultValueAttribute(false)]

When the value of the element/attribute is equal to default value , it is not included in the generated xml !.

Hope this helps.

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There's a way to do this (even for this crappy protocol you use):

[XmlIgnore]
public bool Value { get; set; }

[XmlText]
public string ValueString
{
    get
    {
        return Value ? "<Value>" : "<Value/>";
    }
    set
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have you checked that this will work? I'd have thought this would escape the angle-bracket characters, which won't look like even the invalid xml that the OP wants. I'm not responsible for the downvote though, so if whoever did downvote is reading this, please have the good grace to say why. –  Tom W Apr 27 '11 at 16:14

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