Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Rails 3 application on Ruby 1.9.2 in which users enter business hours and they are stored in a MySQL database. When a user does this, however, the entered time "8:00 AM" gets stored as 3pm in the database. I want it to be stored as they entered it, regardless of time zone. I figured the best way to do this is to set everything to UTC and have it ignore my time zone (Arizona), but Rails seems to be ignoring my setting. Example:

Time.zone = 'UTC'

mon_open_date = Time.parse(params[:venue][:mon_open_at]) rescue nil

# => 2011-04-27 08:00:00 -0700

The result in MySQL:

+-------------+
| mon_open_at |
+-------------+
| 15:00:00    |
+-------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Time.parse always parses the string into your computer's local timezone. You need to use Time.zone.parse in order to parse it as the specified timezone, UTC.

share|improve this answer
    
That did the trick, thanks! –  huertanix Apr 27 '11 at 12:09

MySQL always uses the server's time zone setting, by default (though you can change that, if you are the database admin).

If you store your date/time values in TIMESTAMP columns, they are stored in a time-zone agnostic manner (being converted to UTC for storage, and then back to the server's time zone again for usage).

If you store your date/times in a DATETIME column, the values are stored exactly as you enter them - if you change the server's time zone, and then SELECT old values out of a DATETIME column, you will see exactly the same values as when you entered them.

Check out the documentation on DATETIME/TIMESTAMP columns for the finer points.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.