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HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="first">Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers, people who write code because they love it.</div>
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</div>

CSS:

#wrapper {
    width: 500px;
    border: 1px solid black;
}
#first {
    width: 300px;
    border: 1px solid red;
}
#second {
    border: 1px solid green;
}

I would like the two divs to be next to each other inside the wrapper div. In this case, the height of the green div should determine the height of the wrapper.

How could I achieve this via CSS ?

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2  
Also: stackoverflow.com/questions/446060/… –  radek Jun 27 '11 at 16:58
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4 Answers

up vote 114 down vote accepted

float one or both inner divs..

Float One:

#wrapper {
    width: 500px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    overflow: hidden; /* will contain if #first is longer than #second */
}
#first {
    width: 300px;
    float:left; /* add this */
    border: 1px solid red;
}
#second {
    border: 1px solid green;
    overflow: hidden; /* if you don't want #second to wrap below #first */
}

or if you float both, you'll need to encourage the wrapper div to contain both the floated children, or it will think it's empty and not put the border around them

#wrapper {
    width: 500px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    overflow: hidden; /* add this to contain floated children */
}
#first {
    width: 300px;
    float:left; /* add this */
    border: 1px solid red;
}
#second {
    border: 1px solid green;
    float: left; /* add this */
}
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you could set overflow:auto on the #wrapper So the size would still adapt to the contents size. (Without the need of a clear:both element) –  meo Apr 27 '11 at 11:09
    
yes in example one, if the #first is longer, you certainly could - containing floats 101 eh ;).. overflow hidden on the #second avoids the need to calculate a left margin though otherwise the solutions are basically the same –  clairesuzy Apr 27 '11 at 11:28
2  
Exactly! I don't want to calculate the margin. overflow: hidden does a great job here! However, it still kind of magic to me. I thought that overflow: hidden should hide the content if it doesn't fit its container. But, here the behavior is a bit different. Could you elaborate on that please ? –  Misha Moroshko Apr 27 '11 at 11:37
1  
the overflow property will clear floats both vertical and horizontal which is why in my first example, #second doesn't need a left margin, the overflow property works as long as it's value is not visible.. I prefer hidden to auto for those just in case scenarios so a scroll bar is not generated by accident (which auto will do).. either way there will be no content hidden a scenario like this as it will only be hidden if it goes outside your 500px width but as long as there's no height content will wrap within the width as normal.. no hiding ;) –  clairesuzy Apr 27 '11 at 11:43
    
in some cases an unexpected element like a list for example, may have been set to 100% width and it's default padding still exists, that would make it bigger than the 100% of your next to floated container.. if you use auto you will get a horizontal scrollbar, if you use hidden it will clip.. it's preference really as either way shows that there's a width mismatch –  clairesuzy Apr 27 '11 at 11:45
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You can sit elements next to each other by using the CSS float property:

#first {
float: left;
}
#second {
float: left;
}

You'd need to make sure that the wrapper div allows for the floating in terms of width, and margins etc are set correctly.

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here is the solution:

#wrapper {
    width: 500px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    overflow: auto; /* so the size of the wrapper is alway the size of the longest content */
}
#first {
    float: left;
    width: 300px;
    border: 1px solid red;
}
#second {
    border: 1px solid green;
    margin: 0 0 0 302px; /* considering the border you need to use a margin so the content does not float under the first div*/
}

your demo updated;

http://jsfiddle.net/dqC8t/1/

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Thanks. If I omit overflow: auto; it still works. Could you give an example where it is required ? –  Misha Moroshko Apr 27 '11 at 11:19
    
yes sure: remove the overflow auto and make the content of first longer then the content of second, you well see that the size of the container only adapts, when you set overflow auto on it, or if you use a clearing element: jsfiddle.net/dqC8t/3 –  meo Apr 27 '11 at 11:21
    
OK, I see, thanks! However, I didn't like margin: 0 0 0 302px; because it depends on width: 300px;. But, thanks anyway!! –  Misha Moroshko Apr 27 '11 at 11:33
    
you dont need it if you specify i width for your second div –  meo Apr 27 '11 at 12:57
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Having two divs,

<div id="div1">The two divs are</div>
<div id="div2">next to each other.</div>

you could also use the display property:

#div1 {
    display: inline-block;
}

#div2 {
    display: inline-block;
}

jsFiddle example here.

If div1 is too tall, div2 will be placed next to div1 at the bottom. To solve this, use vertical-align:top; on div2.

jsFiddle example here.

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