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In an iPhone iOS4 app containing an existing SQLite database (i.e. there at compile time), how secure is the data in the SQLite database?

For example, is it worth encrypting an SQLite database (using the sqlite3_key(...) method sold under license)?

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@All: A quick explanation on why the iPhone is not secure, even for developers - wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/iphone-encryption –  SK9 May 3 '11 at 22:05

3 Answers 3

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It is secured until the iPhone is jailbreaked. After jailbreak one can go to your database and can copy it to his desktop and then can see your data. So I think if you have very important data then you should encrypt your database

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The SQLite database can be encrypted. To my mind it looks like the main problem is how to deliver a key. Putting this key in the source code is idiotic; having the key delivered (once?) from a secure server is more promising. Even then, there's the issue of where to put the key when it arrives. For example, can an evil person retrieve it once it's been put in the keychain? (Probably...) –  SK9 Apr 28 '11 at 9:12

First question you have to answer is how valuable is your data? That somewhat determines how much time a hacker is willing to spend trying to get at it. Security is a complex subject and you could spend days researching IOS security. It depends heavily on the IOS version, with IOS 4 being the first release that has a decent chance of being really secure. First off nothing is secure unless your device is locked. Also, your database is NOT encrypted even if the device is locked unless you set data protection flags in your code. Sandbox doesn't help you here at all really, except to protect one apps data from another. A hacker with your device will jailbreak it and install an SSH server and at that point can pretty much do whatever they want, including brute-force passcode breaking attempts. If an IOS 4 device was locked with a decent passcode and you set data protection on your database, you are probably ok with counting on the IOS hardware encryption. But can you depend on users to set a decent passcode? The default simple passcode is only 4 digits - not that great. And will they all be IOS 4+ users? If not, you'll need your own encryption on the database. Just don't store the key anywhere, cuz hackers will find it. And while you are considering security in your coding, consider that hackers can also decompile and run a modified version of your app.

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@user69..2: The SQLite database can be encrypted, so it's safe when not near the app. To my mind it looks like the main problem is how to deliver a key. Putting this key in the source code is idiotic; having the key delivered (once?) from a secure server is more promising. Even then, there's the issue of where to put the key when it arrives. For example, can an evil person retrieve it once it's been put in the keychain? (Probably...) If Apple had some keychains for developer's to protect their data........... –  SK9 Apr 28 '11 at 9:13
    
If an app has truly sensitive data, have them enter the key whenever the app starts and never store it (other than in memory). Rather inconvenient, but then that's always the trade off with security. –  ax123man Apr 29 '11 at 0:26

AFAIK data are physically encrypted on iOS 4.x devices. Add to that the fact that application are sandboxed, it's a fairly secure system.

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Any file can be accessed on a jailbroken device –  Claus Broch Apr 27 '11 at 14:21
    
As Claus says, the phone is secure until it's jailbroken. So it's not really very secure at all. –  SK9 Apr 28 '11 at 9:14
    
depends on what you mean by "accessed". If the device was passcode locked, then you will have a hard time reading any hardware encrypted data. –  ax123man Apr 29 '11 at 14:31

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