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I am checking the uploaded image in a registration form , where i need to use try catch blocks. here is my code:

public bool CheckFileType(string FileName)
{
        string Ext = Path.GetExtension(FileName);
        switch (Ext.ToLower())
        {
            case ".gif":                   
                return true;
                break;
            case ".JPEG":                    
                return true;
                break;
            case ".jpg":                  
                return true;
                break;
            case ".png":                   
                return true;
                break;
            case ".bmp":                   
                return true;
                break;
            default:                  
                return false;
                break;
        }

}

please suggest me how to use the try catch blocks here.

thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
Why do you need to "use try catch blocks"? What have you tried so far? –  Richard Apr 27 '11 at 11:34
    
Which part of your code will throw an exception, in your opinion? –  Groo Apr 27 '11 at 11:35
10  
and why do you use .JPEG if you look for lower case extensions? –  Ivan Crojach Karačić Apr 27 '11 at 11:35
    
you should accept answer given to your question. –  sikender Apr 27 '11 at 11:36
6  
Also you don't have to use return and break, because the return acts as a break anyway and ends the method. –  Simon Woker Apr 27 '11 at 11:36
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A better can be like this,

 public bool CheckFileType(string FileName)
 {
    bool result = false ;

    try
     {
      string Ext = Path.GetExtension(FileName);
      switch (Ext.ToLower())
      {
        case ".gif":                   
        case ".JPEG":                    
        case ".jpg":                  
        case ".png":                   
        case ".bmp":                   
            result = true;
            break;
       }

      }catch(Exception e)
      {
         // Log exception 
      }
      return result;
     }
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for leaving the Path call outside the try/catch. –  Henk Holterman Apr 27 '11 at 11:38
    
@Henk : noted it before you pointed, anyways thanks for a prompt friendly fire ;) –  Furqan Apr 27 '11 at 11:39
    
comparing ".JPEG" to Ext.ToLower() is unlikely to match ;) –  Town Apr 27 '11 at 11:42
    
How to use try/catch here? OK you just put them into the method's body and that's it. I like this answer –  username Apr 27 '11 at 11:48
add comment

There are plenty of ways that you can use exceptions in methods that return values:

Place your return statement outside the try-catch For example:

T returnValue = default(T);
try
{
    // My code
}
catch 
{
    // Exception handling code
}
return returnValue;

Put a return statement inside your catch

try
{
    // My code
}
catch 
{
    // Handle exception
    return default(T);
}

Throw an exception

You don't have to return a value, the method simply has to end (e.g. reach a return statement or a throw statement). Depending on the exception its not always valid to return a value.

You should think carefully about when and how to catch and handle exceptions:

  1. What might fail?
  2. Why / how can they fail?
  3. What should I do when they fail?

In your case:

  1. The only statement that can fail is string Ext = Path.GetExtension(FileName);, which according to the documentation can fail if FileName contains. (Note that GetExtension doesn't return null, even if FileName is null).
  2. This might happen if the user supplied a string that contains these invalid characters.
  3. If this happens, I guess that we should return false, to indicate that the path is not valid (however this depends on the application).

So I'd probably handle exceptions like this:

public bool CheckFileType(string FileName)
{
    string Ext;
    try
    {
        Ext = Path.GetExtension(FileName);
    }
    catch (ArgumentException ex)
    {
        return false;
    }
    // Switch statement
}

Note that we only catch the exception that we are expected (ArgumentException), and we only place the try statement around the statement that we expect the exception to be thrown from.

In fact its a good idea to avoid throwing and catching exceptions wherever possible - not only do they incur a performance penalty (which can cause serious problems if this method is called inside a loop), but you might inadvertently catch and handle an exception that you didn't anticipate, masking a more serious problem.

In this case we can avoid throwing the exception entirely by checking ourselves to see if FileName contains any invalid characters:

public bool CheckFileType(string FileName)
{
    if (FileName == null)
    {
        return false;
    }
    if (FileName.IndexOfAny(System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars()) >= 0)
    {
        return false;
    }
    // Your original method goes here
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't like catching ArgumentException. I would prefer just checking the Filename for invalid characters with an if. Other than that, great answer. +1. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 27 '11 at 11:57
    
I think, in this particular case, if an error occurs it should bubble up the stack, and not be catched\processed in this method. –  data Apr 27 '11 at 12:01
    
@Martinho Heh, I was just adding that as you posted :-) –  Justin Apr 27 '11 at 12:02
    
Unfortunately (just read it): "The array returned from this method is not guaranteed to contain the complete set of characters that are invalid in file and directory names." :( –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 27 '11 at 12:03
    
@data_smith It depends on the application - in this case I'd say that either checking yourself or allowing the exception to be thrown is fine and catching / masking the exception is less favorable, however I showed it anyway as in many cases you can't help exceptions being thrown (such as in IO), and it demonstrates how to think about exceptions (what might throw? why would it throw? what should I do about it?) –  Justin Apr 27 '11 at 12:06
show 1 more comment

As you're not actually testing the file type (only the extension of the filename), I'd first start by renaming the method. You can make an extension method to handle it:

public static bool HasImageExtension(this string fileName)
{
    try
    {
        if (fileName == null) return false;

        string[] validExtensions = new string[] { ".gif", ".jpg", ".jpeg", ".png", ".bmp" };

        string extension = Path.GetExtension(fileName);
        return validExtensions.Contains(extension);
    }
    // catch the specific exception thrown if there are 
    // invalid characters in the path
    catch (ArgumentException ex) 
    {
        // do whatever you need to do to handle 
        // the fact there are invalid chars
        throw; 
    }
}

Which you can then call, like so:

string fileName = "testFileName.jpg";
bool hasImageExtension = fileName.HasImageExtension();
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, Path.GetExtension could also throw if path contains invalid characters –  Groo Apr 27 '11 at 11:49
    
@Groo: Yep, you're right - totally ruins my answer, time for an update ;) –  Town Apr 27 '11 at 11:57
add comment

This should work:

public bool CheckFileType(string FileName)
{
    try
    {
        string Ext = Path.GetExtension(FileName).ToLower();
        string[] okExt = ".gif|.jpg|.jpeg|.png|.bmp".Split('|');

        foreach(var item in okExt)
        {
            if(Ext == item)
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        throw;
    }
}

And remember: never catch exceptions you're not going to handle. (or atleast re-throw them)

share|improve this answer
1  
Otherwise return false; is what I'm missing. –  merxbj Apr 27 '11 at 11:42
1  
Where's the try/catch? Seems you solved the wrong problem. –  Henk Holterman Apr 27 '11 at 11:42
    
Fixed issues mentioned above. –  data Apr 27 '11 at 11:43
    
Or, you could use LINQ: return ".gif|.jpg|.jpeg|.png|.bmp".Split('|').Any(e => e.Equals(Ext));. –  Groo Apr 27 '11 at 11:51
    
I think this might be clearer; return new List<string> { ".gif", ".jpeg", ".jpg", ".png", ".bmp" }.Contains(ext); –  Chris McAtackney Apr 27 '11 at 11:55
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