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I've been trying to avoid using a cursor in this particular case just because I dislike the tradeoffs, and it just so happens a process I'm using makes triggers look like the proper course of action anyway.

A stored procedure inserts a record based off of a complicated mix of clauses, using an insert trigger I send an email to the target user telling them to visit a site. This is easy and works fine.

However, another procedure is to run nightly and redistribute all unviewed records. The way I was doing this was to do another insert based on a select on a date field from when it was assigned. To wit:

INSERT INTO Table (ID, User, AssignDate, LastActionDate)
    SELECT 
        ID
        ,User
        ,GETDATE() [AssignDate]
        ,GETDATE() [LastModifiedDate]
    FROM Table2
        /*snip*/

The trigger works on individual inserts, but the select statement above only works on the last inserted row. Is there a way to get around this behavior? It ruins the whole thing!

Edit (trigger code):

ALTER TRIGGER dbo.Notify
    ON  dbo.Table
    AFTER INSERT
AS 
BEGIN

    DECLARE @EmailSender varchar(50)='Sender Profile'
    DECLARE @Identity int
    DECLARE @User varchar(20)
    DECLARE @Subject varchar(50)

    SET @Identity=@@Identity

    SELECT @User=User, @Subject='(' + CONVERT(varchar,@Identity) + ')!'
    FROM Table
    WHERE
        idNum=@Identity

    exec msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail
        @profile_name=@EmailSender,
        @recipients=@User
        @subject=@Subject,
        @body='//etc'

END
share|improve this question
3  
Triggers in SQL Server fire once per statement, not once per row. So you need to write your trigger code to cope with multiple rows existing in inserted and/or deleted. Usually, this can still be accomplished without resorting to cursors. But we'd need to see more code to advise - all you've shown at the moment is a standard insert statement. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 27 '11 at 14:52
    
Added in the trigger code. –  C Bauer Apr 27 '11 at 15:04
    
I think you will need a cursor for this. I don't think there's any thing provided to allow you to insert multiple emails in one go. –  Martin Smith Apr 27 '11 at 15:09
    
You would not use @@identity, you use the id field from the inserted pseudotable. In fact you almost never should use @@identity in any process as it can return the worng results and mess up our data integrity. –  HLGEM Apr 27 '11 at 15:12
    
@C Bauer - So if a 100 rows are insert in a single statement, you want 100 emails sent? I feel sorry for those recipients. –  Thomas Apr 27 '11 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The insert trigger is called once for bulk inserts, but on the trigger you can use the special inserted table to get all the inserted rows.

So, imagine you have an insert trigger like this one, that logs all the rows inserted into table

create trigger trgInsertTable 
on dbo.table
for insert
as
   insert tableLog(name)
    select name from inserted

With this trigger, when you make a bulk insert on table, the tableLog is filled with the same number of rows that were inserted to table

For you specific trigger, since you need to call a stored procedure for each row, you need to use a cursor:

ALTER TRIGGER dbo.Notify
    ON  dbo.Table
    AFTER INSERT
AS 
BEGIN

    DECLARE @EmailSender varchar(50)='Sender Profile'
    DECLARE @User varchar(20)
    DECLARE @Subject varchar(50)

    DECLARE cursor CURSOR FOR
      SELECT User, '(' + CONVERT(varchar, Id) + ')!'
        FROM inserted

    OPEN cursor
    FETCH NEXT FROM cursor INTO @User, @Subject
    WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN
      exec msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail
          @profile_name=@EmailSender,
          @recipients=@User
          @subject=@Subject,
          @body='//etc'
      FETCH NEXT FROM cursor INTO @User, @Subject
    END
    CLOSE cursor
    DEALLOCATE cursor

END

I didn't tested, but should work

share|improve this answer
    
I suppose I should just skip the trigger altogether then, and move the email code back into the stored procedure that is handling everything as-is? –  C Bauer Apr 27 '11 at 15:14
    
@downvoter, Care to explain? –  Jose Rui Santos Oct 13 '13 at 15:51
    
Just a very minor comment - in case insensitive instance you'll need to select different name for the cursor than 'cursor' –  Jan Dec 12 '13 at 17:08

If you are sending an email, I would not do that from a trigger. Do you really want people to not be able to insert records because the email server is down?

It is usually better to insert the records to a table from the trigger and then have a job that sends the emails that runs every minute or so and updates the email status to sent and adds the sent datetime to the table when each record is sent. This not only allows you to insert records when emails are down, it moves the looping to send each individual email to a table the users are not accessing (and thus any delay processing many records will only affect the new users not anyone else) and it allows you to see a history of when you sent the email which helps when people question why they didn't get it. You can also record in the table if the email failed to send to help identify bad email addresses.

share|improve this answer
1  
Run a cursor every minute? seems ugly! –  C Bauer Apr 27 '11 at 15:20
    
Pretty hard to send emails to just one person at atime without a cursor or a loop. at least if they are in another table they will not interfere with normal operations. –  HLGEM Apr 27 '11 at 15:26
    
@C Bauer,@HLGEM - This would be preferable to running a cursor in a trigger. In addition, it allows you to disable notifications on development machines by simply writing into the notifications table but disabling the email sending proc. This approach would also allow you to externalize the email sending to a service if ever desired. –  Thomas Apr 27 '11 at 15:35

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