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Is it possible to somehow implement the following scheme:

public interface ISomething
{
    void Go(ISpecific specific);

    void Go(Object o);
}

so that on every Go(ISpecific) call the first overload would be called and for the calls with any other possible objects the class would fallback to the Go(Object) implementation?

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1  
It will work. What did you find when tried a simple example in the compiler? –  taylonr Apr 27 '11 at 14:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's how it will work by default - but using the compile-time types. If you have Go(foo) and the compile-time type of foo doesn't implement ISpecific, it will call the second method even if the object that foo refers to at execution time implements ISpecific. If you want this decision to be made dynamically at execution time, and if you're using C# 4, you could write:

dynamic value = GetValue();
something.Go(value);

... and at execution time, the correct overload will be selected.

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Can you suggest an example of this form's usefulness? Funny, I was just reading one of your blog posts on variance and overloading this morning. –  Justin Morgan Apr 27 '11 at 14:21
    
@Justin: I don't tend to do much in the way of dynamic typing, so I'm not sure... but it sounds like it's what the OP might be after. –  Jon Skeet Apr 27 '11 at 14:24

Yes. That is how the compiler works.

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Yes it is possible to do that. Note though that the decision on which overload to take will be done based on the compile time type of the reference.

ISpecific specificVar = null;
something.Go(specificVar);  // ISomething::Go(ISpecific)
object obj = specificVar;
something.Go(obj);  // ISomething::Go(object)
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Yes it definitely works, any object that is not ISpecific will call the object overload.

I wrote a console app to check.

it outputs

Object 
Object
Specific

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Object aSpecific = new Object();
        String nonSpecific = "nonSpecific";
        ISpecific specific = new Specific();

        ISomething something = new Something();

        something.Go(aSpecific);
        something.Go(nonSpecific);
        something.Go(specific);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

interface ISpecific
{
    void GoGo();
}

interface ISomething
{
    void Go(ISpecific specific)
    void Go(Object o)
}

Class Specific : ISpecific
{
    public Specific() { }

    public void GoGo()
    {
         Console.WriteLine("Specific");
    }
}

Class Something : ISomething
{
    public Something() { }

    public void Go(ISpecific specific)
    {
        specific.GoGo()
    }

    public void Go(Object o)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Object");
    }
}
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