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I have simple class

public class ActiveAlarm {
    public long timeStarted;
    public long timeEnded;
    private String name = "";
    private String description = "";
    private String event;
    private boolean live = false;
}

and List<ActiveAlarm> con. How to sort in ascending order by timeStarted, then by timeEnded? Can anybody help? I know in C++ with generic algorithm and overload operator <, but I am new to Java.

share|improve this question
    
Answer by @Yishai in this post demonstrates elegant use of enum for custom sorting and grouped sorting (multiple arguments) utilizing comparator chaining. – gunalmel Sep 16 '12 at 4:04

10 Answers 10

Either make ActiveAlarm implement Comparable<ActiveAlarm> or implement Comparator<ActiveAlarm> in a separate class. Then call:

Collections.sort(list);

or

Collections.sort(list, comparator);

In general, it's a good idea to implement Comparable<T> if there's a single "natural" sort order... otherwise (if you happen to want to sort in a particular order, but might equally easily want a different one) it's better to implement Comparator<T>. This particular situation could go either way, to be honest... but I'd probably stick with the more flexible Comparator<T> option.

EDIT: Sample implementation:

public class AlarmByTimesComparer implements Comparator<ActiveAlarm> {
  @Override
  public int compare(ActiveAlarm x, ActiveAlarm y) {
    // TODO: Handle null x or y values
    int startComparison = compare(x.timeStarted, y.timeStarted);
    return startComparison != 0 ? startComparison
                                : compare(x.timeEnded, y.timeEnded);
  }

  // I don't know why this isn't in Long...
  private static int compare(long a, long b) {
    return a < b ? -1
         : a > b ? 1
         : 0;
  }
}
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1  
Absolutely right! Perhaps you could add a quick example of using Comparator as the OP intended (timestarted, then timeended) – Java Drinker Apr 27 '11 at 14:27
1  
@Java Drinker: Coming up... – Jon Skeet Apr 27 '11 at 14:28
    
That compare() function isn't in Long likely because the implementation is even more trivial: return a - b; – papercrane Jan 10 '14 at 0:33
4  
@papercrane: No, that fails for overflow reasons. Consider a = Long.MIN_VALUE, b = 1. – Jon Skeet Jan 10 '14 at 5:06
    
as of API 19 (KitKat) Long now has a .compare – Martín Marconcini Apr 27 at 22:41

Using Comparator

For Example:

class Score {

    private String name;
    private List<Integer> scores;
    // +accessor methods
}

    Collections.sort(scores, new Comparator<Score>() {

        public int compare(Score o1, Score o2) {
            return o2.getScores().get(0).compareTo(o1.getScores().get(0));
        }
    });
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2  
this is beautiful – mihail Jun 9 '14 at 8:25
1  
The perfect solution for what I was trying to do! – Shadoninja Aug 21 '15 at 19:36
    
I'm confused on where you put the second bit of code... – MicroR Jan 12 at 1:52
    
best solution ever – Ravi Mar 12 at 14:33

We can sort the list in one of two ways:

1. Using Comparator : When required to use the sort logic in multiple places If you want to use the sorting logic in a single place, then you can write an anonymous inner class as follows, or else extract the comparator and use it in multiple places

  Collections.sort(arrayList, new Comparator<ActiveAlarm>() {
        public int compare(ActiveAlarm o1, ActiveAlarm o2) {
            //Sorts by 'TimeStarted' property
            return o1.getTimeStarted()<o2.getTimeStarted()?-1:o1.getTimeStarted()>o2.getTimeStarted()?1:doSecodaryOrderSort(o1,o2);
        }

        //If 'TimeStarted' property is equal sorts by 'TimeEnded' property
        public int doSecodaryOrderSort(ActiveAlarm o1,ActiveAlarm o2) {
            return o1.getTimeEnded()<o2.getTimeEnded()?-1:o1.getTimeEnded()>o2.getTimeEnded()?1:0;
        }
    });

We can have null check for the properties, if we could have used 'Long' instead of 'long'.

2. Using Comparable(natural ordering): If sort algorithm always stick to one property: write a class that implements 'Comparable' and override 'compareTo' method as defined below

class ActiveAlarm implements Comparable<ActiveAlarm>{

public long timeStarted;
public long timeEnded;
private String name = "";
private String description = "";
private String event;
private boolean live = false;

public ActiveAlarm(long timeStarted,long timeEnded) {
    this.timeStarted=timeStarted;
    this.timeEnded=timeEnded;
}

public long getTimeStarted() {
    return timeStarted;
}

public long getTimeEnded() {
    return timeEnded;
}

public int compareTo(ActiveAlarm o) {
    return timeStarted<o.getTimeStarted()?-1:timeStarted>o.getTimeStarted()?1:doSecodaryOrderSort(o);
}

public int doSecodaryOrderSort(ActiveAlarm o) {
    return timeEnded<o.getTimeEnded()?-1:timeEnded>o.getTimeEnded()?1:0;
}

}

call sort method to sort based on natural ordering

Collections.sort(list);
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JAVA 8 and Above Answer

In Java 8, Lambda expressions were introduced to make this even easier! Instead of creating a Comparator() object with all of it's scaffolding, you can simplify it as follows: (Using your object as an example)

Collections.sort(list, (ActiveAlarm a1, ActiveAlarm a2) -> a1.timeStarted-a2.timeStarted);

That one statement is equivalent to the following:

Collections.sort(scores, new Comparator<ActiveAlarm>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(ActiveAlarm a1, ActiveAlarm a2) {
        return a1.timeStarted - a2.timeStarted;
    }
});

Think of Lambda expressions as only requiring you to put in the relevant parts of the code: the method signature and what gets returned.

Another part of your question was how to compare against multiple fields. To do that with Lambda expressions, you can always do the following:

Collections.sort(list, (ActiveAlarm a1, ActiveAlarm a2) -> 
    (a1.timeStarted - a2.timeStarted) != 0
        ? (a1.timeStarted - a2.timeStarted)
        : (a1.timeEnded - a2.timeEnded)
);

One last note: It is easy to compare 'long' or 'int' primitives, you can just subtract one from the other. If you are comparing objects ('Long' or 'String'), I suggest you use their built-in comparison. Example:

Collections.sort(list, (ActiveAlarm a1, ActiveAlarm a2) -> a1.name.compareTo(a2.name) );
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3  
You might appreciate the new Java 8 API Comparator.comparing().thenComparing()... – Lukas Eder Mar 13 at 14:45
    
Thanks! didn't know about that... – John Fowler Mar 16 at 15:20
public class ActiveAlarm implements Comparable<ActiveAlarm> {
    public long timeStarted;
    public long timeEnded;
    private String name = "";
    private String description = "";
    private String event;
    private boolean live = false;

    public int compareTo(ActiveAlarm a) {
        if ( this.timeStarted > a.timeStarted )
            return 1;
        else if ( this.timeStarted < a.timeStarted )
            return -1;
        else {
             if ( this.timeEnded > a.timeEnded )
                 return 1;
             else
                 return -1;
        }
 }

That should give you a rough idea. Once that's done, you can call Collections.sort() on the list.

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In java you need to use the static Collections.sort method. Here is an example for a list of CompanyRole objects, sorted first by begin and then by end. You can easily adapt for your own object.

private static void order(List<TextComponent> roles) {

    Collections.sort(roles, new Comparator() {
        public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {

            int x1 = ((CompanyRole) o1).getBegin();
            int x2 = ((CompanyRole) o2).getBegin();

            if (x1 != x2) {
                return x1 - x2;
            } else {
                int y1 = ((CompanyRole) o1).getEnd();
                int y2 = ((CompanyRole) o2).getEnd();
                return y2 - y1;
            }
        }
    });
}

The list will now be sorted :)

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You can call Collections.sort() and pass in a Comparator which you need to write to compare different properties of the object.

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You can use Collections.sort and pass your own Comparator<ActiveAlarm>

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Guava's ComparisonChain:

Collections.sort(list, new Comparator<ActiveAlarm>(){
            @Override
            public int compare(ActiveAlarm a1, ActiveAlarm a2) {
                 return ComparisonChain.start()
                       .compare(a1.timestarted, a2.timestarted)
                       //...
                       .compare(a1.timeEnded, a1.timeEnded).result();
            }});
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As mentioned you can sort by:

  • Making your object implement Comparable
  • Or pass a Comparator to Collections.sort

If you do both, the Comparable will be ignored and Comparator will be used. This helps that the value objects has their own logical Comparable which is most reasonable sort for your value object, while each individual use case has its own implementation.

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