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Does anyone know if it's possible to use Ninject to resolve any unresolved abstract dependencies outside of the instantiation process? I've just been looking into constructor injection vs property/method/field injection, but it looks to me as though Ninject is still expecting to be the creator of the type using the IKernel.Get<>() method.

Basically, we're using MVC3 to build our product, and we've come up against a situation where we want the default ModelBinder to map form values to an instance of the object, and then be able to call a method on the submitted ViewModel that is dependent on an abstract interface e.g.

public class InviteFriend {
    [Required]
    public string EmailAddress { get; set; }

    public void Execute() {
        var user = IUserRepository.GetUser(this.EmailAddress);

        if (user == null) {
               IUserRepository.SaveInvite(this.EmailAddress);
        }

        MailMessage toSend = new MailMessage(); // Obviously some logic to prepare the body, subject and other mail properties
        SmtpClient.Send(toSend);
    }
}

where the controller action would receive InviteFriend as the method argument. We want Ninject to be able to resolve that IUserRepository dependency, but I can't quite work out how to since the object itself is instantiated by the MVC ModelBinder rather than Ninject IKernel.Get<>().

Maybe the solution is a Ninject-based ModelBinder, or does that seem a really bad idea?

EDIT TO ADD: After the comments below, I realise that my hastily mocked-up code sample doesn't really reflect what we're facing. I've updated the code sample to reflect that the logic for InviteFriend.Execute() is more complex than just calling a method on one repository. Potentially, this is logic representing a discrete task that could co-ordinate interactions between multiple different domain objects and multiple repositories. The repositories are defined abstractly, and ideally would be resolved by Ninject.

share|improve this question
    
I feel like it is bad idea to have methods like this in model - any data manipulation should be done by controller. Model should represent data and data only. –  Lukáš Novotný Apr 27 '11 at 14:55
    
I agree with Lukas that the controller should have the IUserRepository and the InviteFriend class should only do what it is supposed to do: represent user input data. –  Daniel Marbach Apr 27 '11 at 21:09
    
Will this not result in fat controllers though? My thinking here is that going for this logic within the ViewModel, or maybe better termed Command-style objects, keeps the business logic within domain objects and then be more easily re-usable, rather than effectively putting business logic in Controller action methods which only leaves scope for copy-paste style code reuse. This way, a Silverlight/WP7 app could re-use the same command-style object and not need to duplicate the code for the same logic... –  jonsidnell Apr 27 '11 at 21:55
    
Why don't you add a proper business layer and inject it into the controllers? –  Remo Gloor Apr 27 '11 at 22:52

2 Answers 2

I think what you are looking for is somewhat the following scenario:

public class InviteFriend {
    [Required]
    public string EmailAddress { get; set; }

    // More information
}

public interface ICommand {
    void Execute();
}

public class InviteFriendCommand : ICommand
{
    public InviteFriend(InviteFriend info, IUserRepository userRepo, IMailSender mailSender) {
        this.inviteFriend = info;
        this.userRepo = userRepo;
        this.mailSender = mailSender;
    }

    public void Execute() {
        var user = this.userRepo.GetUser(this.inviteFriend.EmailAddress);

        if (user == null) {
               this.userRepo.SaveInvite(this.inviteFriend.EmailAddress);
        }

        MailMessage toSend = new MailMessage(); // Obviously some logic to prepare the body, subject and other mail properties
        this.mailSender.Send(toSend);
    }
}

public interface ICommandFactory {
    ICommand CreateInviteFriendCommand(InviteFriend info);
}

public class CommandFactory {

    public CommandFactory(IResolutionRoot resolutionRoot) {
        this.resolutionRoot = resolutionRoot;
    }

    ICommand CreateInviteFriendCommand(InviteFriend info) {
        this.resolutionRoot.Get<InviteFriendCommand>(new ConstructorArgument("info", info));
    }
}

public class YourController {

    // Somewhere

    var command = this.commandFactory.CreateInviteFriendCommand(info);
    command.Execute();

}

public class YourModule : NinjectModule {

    override Load() {
        Bind<IUserRepository>().To<UserRepo>().InRequestScope();
        Bind<ICommandFactory>().To<CommandFactory>().InRequestScope();
        Bind<InviteFriendCommand>().ToSelf().InRequestScope();
    }
}

Forgive me when you need to tweak it a bit. I hacked it together with my out of brain compiler ;)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but wanted to point out injecting a resolutinroot is bad news - letting containers leak too far in. Consider binding Func<InviteFriend,ICommand> or use the Func module @Remo Gloor gave in another answer (forthcoming in 2.3-4 I believe) –  Ruben Bartelink Apr 28 '11 at 19:40
    
Hy Ruben, You're right. I always try to use the Func<> approach. But sometimes this gets to complicated. That's why we decide in my team that factories can use IResolutionRoot. –  Daniel Marbach Apr 30 '11 at 10:41
    
Thanks for your comment - this is definitely a more SOLID way to implement the InviteFriend command I outlined, so I've upvoted it as a good, well-thought-out answer. However, I've not accepted it as the answer since my question was about Ninject's capabilities rather than about the best architecture for the solution. Thanks for taking the time to answer though :) –  jonsidnell May 3 '11 at 14:13
    
Marbarch: I can see your point - I definitely phrased my point too dogmatically. (Having said that, the further you let Container trickery seep into your app the more the temptation to over-use stuff from the container which is better surfaced as normal code, but I'm sure you're well aware of that.) –  Ruben Bartelink May 3 '11 at 23:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you for all your comments, but I've subsequently found the information I was looking for.

The answer is that it is possible to inject dependencies post-instantiation with Ninject. The solution is as follows:

public class InviteFriend {
    [Inject]
    public IUserRepository UserRepo { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string EmailAddress { get; set; }

    public void Execute() {
        var user = UserRepo.GetUser(this.EmailAddress);

        if (user == null) {
               UserRepo.SaveInvite(this.EmailAddress);
        }

        MailMessage toSend = new MailMessage(); // Obviously some logic to prepare the body, subject and other mail properties
        SmtpClient.Send(toSend);
    }
}

With client code then using the Ninject kernel as follows:

IKernel container = new StandardKernel(new ModuleWithMyBindings());
container.Inject(instanceOfInviteFriend);

The code itself is a bit more sophisticated than that i.e. I'm not instantiating a new IKernel each time I need it.

I realise that this is architecturally less pure than some of the suggestions put forward in comments, but in the spirit of YAGNI, this is good enough for now and we can always refactor later on with some of the good suggestions in Daniel's answer. However, this was a question about the capabilities of Ninject rather than an architectural review question, and this is what I consider the answer to my own question :)

share|improve this answer
    
Fair enough. Point taken :D –  Daniel Marbach May 4 '11 at 18:18

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