Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was trying to measure the difference between TINYINT and INT when I came across something interesting. For tables with small numbers of columns, the choice of data type does not seem to affect the size of the table.

Server version: 5.1.41-3ubuntu12.10 (Ubuntu)

Example:

mysql> describe tinyint_test;
+----------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field    | Type       | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+----------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id       | int(11)    | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| test_int | tinyint(4) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+----------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> describe tinyint_id_test;
+-------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type       | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id    | tinyint(4) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+-------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> describe int_test;
+--------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field  | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+--------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| not_id | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+--------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from tinyint_test;
+------+----------+
| id   | test_int |
+------+----------+
|    1 |        1 |
|    2 |        2 |
|    3 |      127 |
|   10 |       50 |
+------+----------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from tinyint_id_test;
+------+
| id   |
+------+
|    1 |
|    2 |
|  127 |
|   50 |
+------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from int_test;
+--------+
| not_id |
+--------+
|      1 |
|      2 |
|    127 |
|     50 |
+--------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT TABLE_NAME, DATA_LENGTH FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES where TABLE_SCHEMA like '%test%';
+-----------------+-------------+
| TABLE_NAME      | DATA_LENGTH |
+-----------------+-------------+
| int_test        |          28 |
| tinyint_id_test |          28 |
| tinyint_test    |          28 |
+-----------------+-------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

I vaguely suspect that there might be an internal column in each row, or that the minimum data size for a given row must be at least the size of a full INT, but neither of these suspicions really account for what's happening here. What could be the case is my choice of DATA_LENGTH is the incorrect tool for measuring the true size of the tables, in which case an acceptable answer would point me in the right direction for actually measuring these tables.

EDIT:

I can generate a table of a different size by using two INTs:

mysql> describe int_id_test;
+----------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field    | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+----------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id       | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
| test_int | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+----------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> select * from int_id_test;
+------+----------+
| id   | test_int |
+------+----------+
|    1 |        1 |
|    2 |        2 |
|    3 |      127 |
|   10 |       50 |
+------+----------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT TABLE_NAME, DATA_LENGTH FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES where TABLE_SCHEMA like '%test%';
+-----------------+-------------+
| TABLE_NAME      | DATA_LENGTH |
+-----------------+-------------+
| int_id_test     |          36 |
| int_test        |          28 |
| tinyint_id_test |          28 |
| tinyint_test    |          28 |
+-----------------+-------------+
4 rows in set (0.01 sec)
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

the data_length column is how much hard drive space the operating system allocates for a table.

mysql database page sizes configurable default is 16KB, the three table's data may used same pages, so the data_length are same!!

edit:

innodb engine default page size is 16KB, i don't know this size for other engines

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated my question to show that I can create tables of different size simply by using two INTs. Additionally, these are myisam tables, not innodb. From what I understand myisam tables do not use pages. –  Brent Newey Apr 27 '11 at 16:31
    
@Brent Newey bit.ly/kO4fxT this page will help u understand how myisam record stored on disk –  Neo Apr 28 '11 at 1:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have found a work around for this problem as well as something of an explanation.

After looking at the table structure in a hex editor (on my linux machines these were located in /var/lib/mysql/[DATABASE NAME]/[TABLE NAME].MYD), I found that in all cases the records were created using a minimum of 7 bytes for a row, regardless of the actual data types involved. Any extra bytes that were not used by the table were zeroed out.

Here is an example with a smaller data set to illustrate:

mysql> describe int_test_2;
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type    | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id    | int(11) | YES  |     | NULL    |       |
+-------+---------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from int_test_2;
+------+
| id   |
+------+
|    1 |
|    2 |
+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Looking at this guy in a hex editor, we see:

fd01 0000 0000 00fd 0200 0000 0000

Using information from Neo's link, I was able to decode this row:

  • fd Record header bits.
  • 01000000 Integer value "1" (little endian)
  • 0000 Wasted Space!
  • fd Record header bits.
  • 02000000 Integer value "2" (little endian)
  • 0000 Wasted Space!

However, notice the following:

mysql> alter table int_test_2 MAX_ROWS=50000000, AVG_ROW_LENGTH=4;
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

Now, the MYD file looks like this:

fd01 0000 00fd 0200 0000

That is, it uses the correct sizes.

share|improve this answer

One thing to note is that the number in brackets does not effect the size of that column, i.e an INT(4) is the same size as an INT(11) in terms of storage, all the number in brackets does is pad the returned value with spaces so that it fills 11 or 4 characters.

I suspect if you trully want to work out the size of the tables, you will need to look in the MySQL file itself and see how they are stored. All the data is stored in /var/lib/mysql/ - ibdata & ib_logfile are the main files. Open this in a text editor (Caution - this file may be HUGE depending on the sizes of your databases.. also DO NOT modify this file!!)

All the tables and cells are stored in here, however they are not delimeted, so its very difficult to see where one column ends and the next begins - it is all based on the data size which you are trying to establish. If you know the data in the table you should be able to work out the structure.

Edit: I think some of the data in these files may be stored in hex, so if it doesnt immediately make sense, try a hex editor.

share|improve this answer
    
Since my data file is just shy of 13 Gigs I don't think this will work. The size number in the bracket was set by my choice of tinyint/int when I defined the column. I don't believe it is relevant to the question. –  Brent Newey Apr 27 '11 at 15:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.