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I'm learning C, but I do not understand this:

#define square(x) x*x
a = square(2+3) //a = 11

When this is run, why does a end up being 11?

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10  
Just as a piece of advice, this example shows one of the many reasons why you should avoid using macros in C until the day comes where you really know what you are doing. Of course when that day comes, you will know why to avoid them in detail... –  T.E.D. Apr 27 '11 at 16:13
    
@T.E.D.: Macros (and the preprocessor in general) are a tool like any other. This example doesn't show why you shouldn't use macros in general - it just shows one particular use case for which it's inappropriate to apply them. There are both good and bad uses of macros. –  Stuart Golodetz Apr 27 '11 at 16:21
2  
That said, there are of course more bad uses than good ones :) –  Stuart Golodetz Apr 27 '11 at 16:21
    
please name the question better –  ideasman42 Jul 29 at 14:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

It expands to 2+3*2+3, which is equivalent to 2+(3*2)+3. Use parentheses to fix it:

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))

Now try it with square(x++) and you'll run into more problems (undefined behavior). Avoid doing this as a macro if you can.

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3  
The equivalent c++ function should be just as efficient as a macro (on modern compilers with optimizations turned up) and will not suffer from this problem. –  Loki Astari Apr 27 '11 at 16:09
2  
@Martin: Correct, if the OP is using C++. Indications are it's probably C. I think C99 also has inline functions, and it appears they're an extension in GNU C. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inline_function#Language_support –  Fred Larson Apr 27 '11 at 16:12

square(2+3) expands to 2+3*2+3 which is equivalent to 2+(3*2)+3 [* has higher precedence than +]

On gcc you can use -E option to see what your preprocessor generates

C:\Users\SUPER USER>type a.c
#define square(x) x*x

int main()
{
   a = square(2+3); //a = 11
}

C:\Users\SUPER USER>gcc -E a.c
# 1 "a.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "a.c"


int main()
{
   a = 2+3*2+3;
}

Remedy

Try this

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))
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thanks for the tip, i will use -E :) –  jhon Apr 27 '11 at 16:43
    
+1 for not only finding the problem but also teaching the OP (and the rest of us) how to debug such problems. –  Heinzi Apr 28 '11 at 14:49

Try:

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))
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Because 2 + 3 is substituted literally in the expression x * x, it becomes 2 + 3 * 2 + 3, and the * operator has a higher precedence so you don't get the expected result.

Always enclose macro arguments and the whole expression in parentheses to avoid this:

#define SQUARE(x) ((x) * (x))

Also note that any expression you pass will be evaluated twice, and that can be undesired if the expression has a side effect such as an assignment, or a function call. In these cases it is better to use an inline function.

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2  
Always enclose macros in parentheses, too. With your suggestion, 1.0/square(x) would then be evaluated to 1.0/(2+3)*(2+3), thus 1.0 instead of 0.04. –  Sam Hocevar Apr 27 '11 at 16:11
    
@Sam: point taken. Ironic, but I myself have said that a few months ago in this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/4455307/… –  Blagovest Buyukliev Apr 27 '11 at 16:12

think about what you get when the macro is expanded. The c preprocessor will expand this as

a = 2 + 3 * 2 + 3

You need to correctly define your macro. Always enclose the macro variable in parenthesis. This would give you the expected result.

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))

The macro expansion would be this:

a = ((2 + 3) * (2 + 3))
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Your advice is not "correctly defining" the macro. 1.0/square(x) would be evaluated to 1.0/(2+3)*(2+3), thus 1.0 instead of 0.04. –  Sam Hocevar Apr 27 '11 at 16:10
    
I fixed the incorrectly defined macro. Added another set of enclosing parenthesis. –  don Apr 27 '11 at 16:12

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