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I have made this post over a year ago, and I think it makes sense to update it as it's getting quite a few views.

I'm either missing something out or Microsoft has really messed up MVC. I worked on Java MVC projects and they were clean and simple. This is however a complete mess IMO. Examples online such as NerdDinner and projects discussed on ASP.Net are too basic, hence why they "simply" work. Excuse if this sounds negative, but this is my experience so far.

I have a repository and a service that speaks to the repository. Controllers call service.

My data layer is NOT persistence independent, as the classes were generated by SQL metal. Because of this I have a lot of unnecessary functionality. Ideally I'd like to have POCO, but I didn't find a good way to achieve this yet.

*Update: Of course Microsoft hasn't messed anything up - I did. I didn't fully understand the tools that were at my disposal. The major flaw in what I have done, was that I have chosen a wrong technology for persisting my entities. LINQ to SQL works well in stateful applications as the data context can be easily tracked. However, this is not a case in stateless context. What would be the right choice? Entity Framework code first or code only work pretty well, but what's more importantly, is that it shouldn't matter. MVC, or front end applications must should not aware of how data is persisted. *

When creating entites I can use object binding:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(Customer c)
{
    // Persistance logic and return view
}    

This works great, MVC does some binding behind the scene and everything is "jolly good".

It wasn't "Jolly Good". Customer was a domain model, and what was worse, it was dependent on persistence medium, because it was generated by SQL metal. What I would do now, is design my domain model, which would be independent of data storage or presentation layers. I would then create view model from my domain model and use that instead.

As soon as I'd like to do some more complex, e.g. - save Order which is linked to the customer everything seems to break:

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Create(Order o)
    {
        // Persistance logic and return view
    }

To persist an order I need Customer or at least CustomerId. CustomerId was present in the view, but by the time it has got to Create method, it has lost CustomerId. I don't fancy sitting around debugging MVC code as I won't be able to change it in a hosting envrionment either way.

Ok, a bit of moaning here, sorry. What I would do now, is create a view model called NewOrder, or SaveOrder, or EditOrder depending on what I'm trying to achieve. This view model would contain all the properties that I'm interested in. Out-of-the-box auto binding, as the name implies, will bind submitted values and nothing will be lost. If I want custom behaviour, then I can implement my own "binding" and it will do the job.

Alternative is to use FormCollection:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(FormCollection collection)
{
   // Here I use the "magic" UpdateModel method which sometimes works and sometimes doesn't, at least for LINQ Entities.               
}

This is used in books and tutorials, but I don't see a point in a method which has an alternative: TryUpdateModel - if this crashes or model is invalid, it attempts to update it either way. How can you be certain that this is going to work?

Autobinding with view models will work the most of the time. If it doesn't, then you can override it. How do you know it will always work? You unit test it and you sleep well.

Another approach that I have tried is using ViewModel - wrapper objects with validation rules. This sounds like a good idea, except that I don't want to add annotations to Entity classes. This approach is great for displaying the data, but what do you do when it comes to writing data?

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(CustomViewWrapper submittedObject)
{
    // Here I'd have to manually iterate through fields in submittedObject, map it to my Entities, and then, eventually, submit it to the service/repository.
}    

** View model is a good way forward. There would have to be some mapping code from view model to the domain model, which can then be passed to the relevant service. This is not a correct way, but it's one way of doing it. Auto mapping tools are you best friends and you should find the one that suits your requirements, otherwise you'll be writing tons of boilerplate code.**

Am I missing something out or is this the way Microsoft MVC3 should work? I don't see how this is simplifying things, especiialy in comparisson to Java MVC.

I'm sorry if this sounds negative, but this has been my experience so far. I appreciate the fact that the framework is constantly being improved, methods like UpdateModel get introduced, but where is the documentation? Maybe it's time to stop and think for a little bit? I prefer my code to be consistent throughout, but with what I have seen so far, I have no confidence whatsoever that this is a right way forward.

I love the framework. There is so much to learn and it's not a lot more exciting then it has ever been. Should probably make another post regarding web forms. I hope this is helpful.

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4  
Can you provide more information, say the actual HTML in the client to verify the naming of the inputs are correctly set up to return the customerId and add it to the Order model? This seems more like a rant than an actual question. –  NickLarsen Apr 27 '11 at 16:56
1  
There is AutoMapper project, which helps with mapping view-wrappers, or as sometimes called view-models, to models. Since I don't have any experience with Java MVC frameworks, I'd be interested in how they solve this. –  Steves Apr 27 '11 at 16:58
1  
I would say, that use linq entities that way is bad idea: create special classes for that purpose - this will be much much better. You can call these classes ViewModel. –  VikciaR Apr 27 '11 at 17:17
1  
Well your question sounds like "Me gona use dat ting, but me not like reading manuals.." almost everything that you seak for here were posted in scotgu, haacked or hanselman blogs. –  Alexander Taran Apr 27 '11 at 20:44
1  
Which application layers do you plan to have? Do you want to expose your domain model? Are you going to use Presentation Layer? I think you just need to spend more time with ASP.Net MVC, and gain experiance, I don't know much about Java MVC frameworks, but I think your problems are due to lack of experience with ASP.Net MVC. In Asp.NET MVC, M does not have a direct toolset, it can be any ORM including NHibernate,LinqToEntities, or no ORM at all, they can be simple DTOs, DataContracts, etc, but it still works. –  hazimdikenli May 10 '11 at 14:03
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7 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+75

I don't think your issue is with asp.net MVC but with all the pieces You Choose to use together.

You want it raw and simple?

Use POCOs all around, and implement the repository where you need it.

I haven't used Java MVC, but it'd make the whole question look less like a rant if you include how you solved the particular problem in there.

Let's clear some misconceptions or maybe miscommunication:

  • You can pass complex objects through a post to the view. But you only want to do so if it makes sense, see next bullet
  • The sample you picked there rings some alarms. Accepting Customer data or CustomerID for an order and not checking authorization can be a Big security hole. The same could be said for an Order depending on what you are accepting/allowing. This is a Huge case for the use of ViewModels, regardless of POCOs, LINQ, Asp.net MVC or Java MVC.
  • You can pass simple values not being showed through a post to the view. It's done with hidden fields (which asp.net MVC supports very simply to use the model value), and in some scenarios it generates the hidden fields for you.
  • You are in no way forced to use linq2sql with Asp.net MVC. If you find it lacking for how you intend to use it, move away from it. Note I love linq2sql, but how it is tied to your view of what you can do with asp.net mvc is weird.
  • " I worked on Java MVC projects and they were clean and simple". Working on a project is not the same as designing the project yourself. Design skills does affect what you get out of anything. Not saying is your case, but just wanted to point that out given the lack of specifics on what you're missing from Java MVC.
  • "My data layer is NOT persistence independent, as the classes were generated by SQL metal. Because of this I have a lot of unnecessary functionality. Ideally I'd like to have POCO, but I didn't find a good way to achieve this yet". You picked the wrong technology, linq2sql is Not meant to fit that requirement. It haven't been a problem in the projects I've used it, but everything is designed in such a way that way less tied to its specifics than you seem to be. That said, just move to something else. btw, You should have shared what you used with Java MVC.
  • "CustomerId was present in the view, but by the time it has got to Create method, it has lost CustomerId." If the property is in Order, You can bet your code has the bug. Now, that'd have been a totally different Real question, why it isn't using the CustomerId / such question would come with: your Customer class, the View, what you are passing to the View ... answers would include, but not be limited to: inspect the HTML source in the browser to see what value you are really posting with the source (alternatively use fiddler to see the same), make sure that CustomerId really has the value when you pass it to the View.
  • You said: ""magic" UpdateModel method which sometimes works and sometimes doesn't". It's not magic, you can see what it does and certainly find information on it. Something is off in the information you are posting, my bet is non optional fields or wrong values for information that's parsed ... views support adding validations for that. Without the validations, this can be lacking.
  • You said in a comment: "After UpdateModel is called, i can't explicitly set the CustomerId, I'll have to retrieve a customer object and then assign it to the order, which seems like an overhead as all that I need is CustomerId" ... you are accepting a CustomerId that is user input (even if it is a hidden field), you really want to Validate that input. Additionally you are contradicting yourself, you claim to just need CustomerId, but then you say you need the full Customer Object related to the order bound. Which is it, if you are only binding the CustomerId, you still need to go get that Customer and assign it to the property. There is no magic besides the scenes ...
  • Also in a comment: "Update model is something I'm avoiding completely now as I don't know how it will behave with LINQ entities. In the view model class I have created constructor that converts LINQ entity to my view model. This decreased amount of code in controller, but still doesn't feel right". Reason to use ViewModel (or EditModel) is not because it is linq2sql ... it is because, among many other reasons, you are exposing a model that allows to manipulate way beyond what you actually want to allow the user to modify. Exposing the raw model, if it has fields the user shouldn't be allowed to modify, is the real issue.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for reply. Everything makes sense, I'll post what i've ended up with over the weekend as I don't have time today. In regards to security holes and customer ids - this is just an example and real project has nothing to do with customers and orders. –  user338195 May 13 '11 at 9:47
    
@vikp glad it helped –  eglasius May 13 '11 at 9:56
1  
With .NET MVC3 you can use POCO with EF4.1, is very easy, clean and you keep control of what functionality to include. –  Nestor Jun 2 '11 at 8:08
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1) For the case of saving an order, and not having CustomerId present. If Order has a CustomerId property on it, and you have a stongly typed view, then you can persist this back to your controller action by adding

@Html.HiddenFor(model => model.CustomerId)

Doing this will have the default model binder populate things for you.

2) With respect to using a view model, I would recommend that approach. If you utilize something like AutoMapper you can take some of the pain out of redundant mapping scenarios. If you use something like Fluent Validation then you can separate validation concerns nicely.

Here's a good link on a general ASP.NET MVC implementation approach.

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2  
+1 for AutoMapper –  rboarman Apr 27 '11 at 17:11
    
This is not a solution as I'm encouraged to use third party tools. What's the point if the framework should be handling this for me? In JAVA i can use plain old java objects that are persistence independant. These objects represent my domain model and I can also use them in view models. At the moment I have view models which I have to convert to my domain model and vise versa when reading and writing data. I don't believe that using third party tools is a way forward, otherwise why bother at all? –  user338195 May 10 '11 at 13:25
2  
@vikp: You can use POCO with ASP.NET MVC too, but your question mentioned that that wasn't an option in your case. That approach breaks down pretty quickly anyway, and you end up with views that have loose contracts and untestable spaghetti code. Also, the right third party addition can be quite useful and save you a lot of time and effort--you shouldn't dismiss them so quickly. If you use NuGet, they're basically as easy to add to your projects as any other assembly. –  ataddeini May 10 '11 at 16:35
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If your view is correctly defined then you can easily do this >

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Create(Order o, int CustomerId)
    {
        //you got the id, life back to jolly good (hopefully)
        // Persistance logic and return view
    }

EDIT:

as attadieni mentioned, by correct view I meant you have something like this inside the form tag >

@Html.HiddenFor(model => model.CustomerId)

ASP.NET MVC will automatically bind to the respective parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for the reply. Why do I have to pass CustomerId as a separate parameter if customer is part of the order model. Binding to the Id is not enough when working with entities. After UpdateModel is called, i can't explicitly set the CustomerId, I'll have to retrieve a customer object and then assign it to the order, which seems like an overhead as all that I need is CustomerId. –  user338195 Apr 27 '11 at 17:48
    
Passing customerId works, but what happens when I have multiple foreign keys? Method signature will get massive eventually. Do you know why CustomerId doesn't get set in Order object? –  user338195 Apr 27 '11 at 18:23
2  
Customer is part of Order? Can you add your View markup? It would be easier to reply then. Of the top of my head if you have @Html.HiddenFor(model => model.Customer.CustomerId) then it will bind correctly in ActionResult Create(Order o) –  nEEbz Apr 27 '11 at 22:27
3  
its a fairly simple concept. the data which a controller receives is only what is present in between the <form></form>. Thats how HTTP POST works. It cannot magically bind data from elements if it was never sent to client in the first place. Now I assume that your view had a form with all elements for Order (including the related Customer). If yes then it can bind to Order o. If not then it can't. Again once, I see the view it would be easier to point you. –  nEEbz Apr 27 '11 at 22:39
1  
@vikp, before going to the view to add the order, you can, 1) in the controller, create an empty Order object, then assigned the CustomerID if you know it at that time, then use the hiden field as many mentioned here. 2) If Customer need to be selected by the user, then show a combobox in the view, that will keep the customerID, 3) you can always get the customerID in the [post] controller before saving the order. –  Nestor May 9 '11 at 16:36
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I must be missing the problem.

You have a controller Order with an Action of Create just like you said:

public class OrderController()
{
    [HttpGet]
    public ViewResult Create()
    {
        var vm = new OrderCreateViewModel { 
            Customers = _customersService.All(),
            //An option, not the only solution; for simplicities sake
            CustomerId = *some value which you might already know*; 
            //If you know it set it, if you don't use another scheme.
        }                             
        return View(vm);    
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Create(OrderCreateViewModel model)
    {
        // Persistance logic and return view
    }  
}

The Create action posts back a view model of type OrderCreateViewModel that looks like such.

public class OrderCreateViewModel 
{
    // a whole bunch of order properties....
    public Cart OrderItems { get; set; }
    public int CustomerId { get; set; }

    // Different options
    public List<Customer> Customers { get; set; } // An option
    public string CustomerName { get; set; } // An option to use as a client side search
}

Your view has a dropdown list of customers which you could add as a property to the viewmodel or a textbox which you wire up to to searching on the server side via JQuery where you could set a hidden field of CustomerId when a match is made, however you decide to do it. And if you already know the customerId ahead of time (which some of the other posts seems to imply) then just set it in the viewmodel and bypass all the above.

You have all of your order data. You have the customer Id of the customer attached to this order. You're good to go.

"To persist an order I need Customer or at least CustomerId. CustomerId was present in the view, but by the time it has got to Create method, it has lost CustomerId."

What? Why? If CustomerId was in the view, set, and posted back, it's in the model for the HttpPost Create method which is exactly where you need it. What do you mean it's being lost?

The ViewModel gets mapped to a Model object of type order. As suggested, using AutoMapper is helpful...

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(OrderCreateViewModel model)
{
    if(!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
      return View(model);
    }   

    // Persistance logic and return view

    var orderToCreate = new Order();

    //Build an AutoMapper map
    Mapper.CreateMap<OrderCreateViewModel, Order>();

    //Map View Model to object(s)
    Mapper.Map(model, orderToCreate);       

    //Other specialized mapping and logic

    _orderService.Create(orderToCreate);

    //Handle outcome. return view, spit out error, etc.
}  

It's not a necessity, you can map it manually, but it just makes things easier.

And you're set. If you don't want to use data annotations for validation, fine, do it in the service layer, use the fluent validation library mentioned, whatever you choose. Once you call the Create() method of your service layer with all the data, you're good to go. Where's the disconnect? What are we missing?

ataddeini's answer is correct, I'm just trying to show a bit more code. Upvote ataddeini

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Thank you for the reply. This works and it has a lot more code than typical examples that should in theory work for most scenarios. I'd like to be able to move from view models to my domain model easily, but this has proved to be difficult as LINQ generated classes are not persistence independent. UpdateModel and TryUpdateModel should do the job, but they throw exceptions depending on the entity I'm working with. For example, if I load an entity and its children, UpdateModel fails, when TryUpdateModel may fail quitely, which is not acceptable in my opinion. –  user338195 May 10 '11 at 13:30
    
@CodeRush: ViewModels are the solution to this. AutoMapper is designed to make it easy to move from view models to domain models. Although, at work, we wrapped AutoMapper in a generic ITranslator<Tin, TOut> interface so we can change implementations later (AutoMapper is relatively slow). –  insta Dec 6 '11 at 19:56
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If the Customer Id is already in the Order model (in this example) it should be available without extending the method signature. If you view the source on the rendered view, is the customer id correctly emitted in a hidden field within the form? Are you using the [Bind] attribute on the Order model class and inadvertently preventing the Customer Id from being populated?

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+1 like I just mentioned in one of the items in my answer, I'm betting for it to be the answer to what should have been the real question. –  eglasius May 11 '11 at 19:46
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I would think the Order table would include a CustomerID field, if so, the only problem is maybe you are not including any control in the view to keep that value, then is lost.

Try to follow this example.

1) GET action before sending to the View, let's say you assign the CustomerID at this point.

public ActionResult Create()
        {
            var o = new Order();
            o.CustomerID = User.Identity.Name; // or any other wher you store the customerID
            return View(o);
        }

2) The View, if you don't use any control for the CustomerID, like textbox, combobox, etc, you must use a hidden field to keep the value.

@using (Html.BeginForm())
    {
        @Html.HiddenFor(m => m.CustomerID)

        <label>Requested Date:</label>
        @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.DateRequested)

        ...
    }

3) Finally, the POST action to get and persist the order. In here, as CustomerID was kept in the hidden value, the Model Binder will automatically put all the Form values into the Order object o, then you just need to use CRUD methods and persist it.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(Order o)
        {
            return View();
        }

Can be two approaches for this, one to implicit save all Model values even if not used in the View, and the other is to keep only those values used. I think MVC is doing the right thing to follow the later, avoid unnecessary keep a lot of junk for bigger models, when the only think is, to name one, a CustomerName, somehow it can give you control on what data to keep through the whole cycle action-view-action and save memory.

For more complex scenarios, where not all fields are in the same model, you need to use ViewModels. For example for mater-detail scenarios you would create a OrderViewModel that has two properties: Order o, and IEnumerable< OrderDetail > od, but again, you will need explicit use the values in the View, or use hidden fields.

In recent releases now you can use POCO classes and Code-First that makes all cleaner and easier, You may want to try EF4 + CTP5.

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if you are using services (aka; service layer, business facade), to process lets say the OrderModel, you can extract an Interface, and get your ViewModel/DTO to implement it, so that you can pass back the ViewModel/DTO to the service.

If you are using Repositories to directly manage the data (without a servie layer) in the controller, then you can do it the good old way of Loading the object from a repository and then doing an UpdateModel on it.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(string customerCode, int customerId, Order order)
{
    var cust = _customerRepository.Get(customerId);
    cust.AddOrder(order);//this should carry the customerId to the order.CustomerId
}

Also, URLs might help a bit where it makes sense, I mean you can add the customer identifier in the url to create the order for.

UpdateModel should work, if your FormCollection has values for non-nullable properties and they are empty/null in the FormCollection, then UpdateModel should fail.

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Update model is something I'm avoiding completely now as I don't know how it will behave with LINQ entities. In the view model class I have created constructor that converts LINQ entity to my view model. This decreased amount of code in controller, but still doesn't feel right. –  user338195 May 10 '11 at 13:32
1  
UpdateModel, updates a model (an entity, DTO or a ViewModel) from a collection (of Request.form values), I don't see the problem with using it. And a big question here is what are your application layers, do you want your domain model exposed on the UI level? Do you aim for the easiness, or maintainibility? –  hazimdikenli May 10 '11 at 13:55
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