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I have a code similar to the last code in this link:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.backgroundworker.aspx

But the ComputeFibonacci method is inside another class, so my doWork method would be this:


private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, 
            DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {   
            BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;

            e.Result = new MyClass().ComputeFibonacci((int)e.Argument, worker, e);
        }

My code locks the application for ever when I use the worker.ReportProgress(percentComplete); inside the fibonaci method which is in another class. I think the problem is that the backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged is inside another class, instead of MyClass.

What should I do please?

If I put the fibonaci method inside the same class, the problem won't occur. But in my case, doesn't make sence to put the code inside the same class.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
ProgressChanged fires on the main thread, what is happening within progress changed that you think it's causing issue? Could you provide more code? – mservidio Apr 27 '11 at 17:58
    
its just like the last code in the link I wrote. – Seva Apr 27 '11 at 18:00
    
Yes, can you elaborate on what you mean that your backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged method is in another class? Could you provide small example? – mservidio Apr 27 '11 at 18:03
    
Look, in that link. All methods are inside the FibonacciForm. But I want to use the Fibonaci method inside another class, and call it. Still not understand? So I call using new MyClass().fibonaci() – Seva Apr 27 '11 at 18:07
    
I understand how to use a BackgroundWorker. There is no problem with using another class in a BackgroundWorker, your problem must exist within what you're actually doing in your other class. As the previous answer says, you must have some sort of loop. We need more information on what your other class is doing to understand the problem. – mservidio Apr 27 '11 at 18:10

Make MyClass fire an event:

public class MyClass
{
    public event ProgressChangedEventHandler ProgressChanged;

    protected virtual void OnProgressChanged(int progress)
    {
        if (ProgressChanged!= null)
        {
            ProgressChanged(this, new ProgressChangedEventArgs(progress, null));
        }
    }

    public int ComputeFibonacci(int input)
    {
        //<Calculate stuff>
        OnProgressChanged(currentProgress);
        //...
        return output;
    }
}
private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender,
    DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;

    var myClass = new MyClass();
    myClass.ProgressChanged += (s, pe) => worker.ReportProgress(pe.ProgressPercentage);
    myClass.ComputeFibonacci((int)e.Argument);
}

Something like that.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that's the problem. I need backgroundworker so I will be able to update the screen. The fibonaci method takes a long time and the screen would be freezed. – Seva Apr 27 '11 at 18:03
1  
Edited my answer, you should avoid passing around the worker, use events. – H.B. Apr 27 '11 at 18:11
    
Nice little bit of code there, H.B. I was going to write an example with a static method for ComputeFibonacci, but then I'd have problems using the other class methods like you defined. – jp2code Apr 27 '11 at 18:18
    
I tried that, but unfortunately, the screen still freezing =/ – Seva Apr 27 '11 at 18:25
    
Does your fibonacci method work, as in terminate? You should try setting a few breakpoints and step through some cruicial parts, the problem might lie in a completely different part of the code that you did not post. – H.B. Apr 27 '11 at 18:28

This link might be of help http://blog.decarufel.net/2009/03/good-practice-to-use-dispatcher-in-wpf.html

share|improve this answer
    
It's too much code =x. I read that BackgroundWorker encapsulates this ideia – Seva Apr 27 '11 at 18:27
    
yes, Backgroundworker tries to do the job but sometimes it fails, you will notice this if you play with different STA/MTA COM objects inside it :) – Marino Šimić Apr 27 '11 at 18:36

The ProgressChanged event handler should be in the same class as the DoWork event handler.

In your ComputeFibonacci method, you would pass in the BackgroundWorker object, and call the worker.ReportProgress method. This should call the ProgressChanged delegate.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm already doing this >.< – Seva Apr 27 '11 at 18:34
    
The handlers can be in any class (instance or static). – Henk Holterman Apr 27 '11 at 18:46
    
They can also be in no class at all - anonymous methods and lambdas work as well. – Harry Steinhilber Apr 27 '11 at 19:28

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