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Using str(survey_OM) on my data frame indicates that all of my numerical data is atomic. If I use class(survey_OM$perc.OM) it returns numeric.

I have always thought that the second column of str showed the class of the data but it does not appear that simple... so my questions are:

  1. What is the second column of str reporting?
  2. What is atomic and how does it differ from numeric?
  3. Why in this case would the data appear as atomic and not num or int?

thank you.
dput(head(survey_OM, 20)) provides:

> dput(head(survey_OM, 20))
  structure(list(lake = structure(c(3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 
  3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L), .Label = c("E-2", 
  "E-4", "E pond", "EX 1", "GTH 110", "GTH 112", "GTH 114", "GTH 156", 
  "GTH 91", "GTH 98", "N-1", "NE-10", "NE-11", "NE-3", "NE-8", 
  "NE-9", "NE-9b", "S-10", "S-11", "S-3", "S-6", "S-7"), class = "factor"), 
  date = structure(c(2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
  2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("2007/06/15", 
  "2007/06/18", "2007/06/19", "2007/06/20", "2007/06/21", "2007/06/27", 
  "2007/06/29", "2007/07/07", "2007/07/19", "2007/07/20", "2008/07/26", 
  "2008/07/30", "2008/08/04", "2008/08/06"), class = "factor"), 
  depth = structure(c(2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 
  2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("E", 
  "epi", "H", "hypo"), class = "factor"), 
  depth.m = structure(c(6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L, 6L), .Label = c("", "10.9", "12.9", "1.5", "2", 
  "2.1", "2.2", "2.3", "2.4", "2.5", "2.6", "2.7", "3", "3.1", 
  "3.5", "4", "4.2", "4.8", "4.9", "5", "5.1", "5.5", "6", 
  "6.5", "7", "7.2", "9.9", "not recorded"), class = "factor"), 
  rep = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
  2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("A", 
  "B", "C"), class = "factor"), 
  sed = c(0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 8L, 9L, 0L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 8L, 9L), 
  notes = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
  1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L), .Label = c("", 
  "col on SE side", "lg snail shell", "not collected", "very hard sediments"
  ), class = "factor"), 
  dry.mass = c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
  perc.OM = c(47.1300248455119, 47.4260808104607, 47.7349307375515, 46.4501104675465, 44.1513415737111, 43.5608499678045, 42.9921259842519, 42.2674677347574, 39.6643311064039, 
  39.0968130690949, 46.7768514928267, 46.9211608642763, 46.7877013177158, 
  47.0709930313588, 44.3241152581706, 43.7905468025952, 41.706074101281, 
  36.5061097383474, 37.4329041152142, 37.7757939038389)), .Names = c("lake", 
  "date", "depth", "depth.m", "rep", "sed", "notes", "dry.mass", 
  "perc.OM"), comment = c("working data frame of the sediment char from the 2007 sed    survey       created:", "Wed Apr 27 14:23:33 2011"), row.names = c(NA, 20L), class = "data.frame")

and the complete output of str(survey_OM) is:

> str(survey_OM)
'data.frame':   780 obs. of  9 variables:
 $ lake    : Factor w/ 22 levels "E-2","E-4","E pond",..: 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "names of the lakes"
 $ date    : Factor w/ 14 levels "2007/06/15","2007/06/18",..: 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "date that the cores were collected"
 $ depth   : Factor w/ 4 levels "E","epi","H",..: 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "relative depth ID; epi = shallowest corable Z, hypo =   deepest Z, S, M, D = shallow, med, deep"
 $ depth.m : Factor w/ 28 levels "","10.9","12.9",..: 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "depth that core was collected in m"
 $ rep     : Factor w/ 3 levels "A","B","C": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "replicate ID for core"
 $ sed     : atomic  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "depth of sample from sed/water interface in cm"
 $ notes   : Factor w/ 5 levels "","col on SE side",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "comments on sample"
 $ dry.mass: atomic  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "dry mass of the sediment at that sed Z in g/m^2"
 $ perc.OM : atomic  47.1 47.4 47.7 46.5 44.2 ...
  ..- attr(*, "comment")= chr "percent OM of the samp. based on LOI at 550d C"
 - attr(*, "comment")= chr  "working data frame of the sediment char from the 2007 sed survey created:" "Wed Apr 27 14:23:33 2011"
share|improve this question
1  
@KennyPeanuts: Regarding (2), I think 'atomic' is a general term for the following data types - character, complex, double, integer, and logical. –  Jubbles Apr 27 '11 at 19:14
    
@KennyPeanuts: Regarding (1), if I understand your question correctly, you don't know why the 'notes' column of 'my.data' is displayed as 'Factor'. R generally coerces data into a correspondence with the natural numbers (1, 2, 3, ...) to reduce memory use. These numbers which correspond to the original data are called 'Factors'. For example, if I have a vector ('a', 'b', 'c', 'a', 'a', 'b'), R sees no reason to store six strings, rather it creates a correspondence 'a' : 1, 'b' : 2, 'c' : 3 and stores the vector as (1,2,3,1,1,2). –  Jubbles Apr 27 '11 at 19:25
    
@Jubbles, thanks for your input. Thats not quite what I am confused about. I understand Factor in the case of notes. What I am unclear on is why the numeric variables (e.g., perc.OM) were designated atomic and not num. I am still not totally clear on what atomic is but as you suggest it is a general data type which includes numeric. If I use typeof(my.data$perc.OM), I get double (and I am not sure how that differs from class numeric). I guess I need to better understand R data types and classes. –  KennyPeanuts Apr 27 '11 at 19:36
    
Can you include the whole str() output- you've at least cut the top off. Also, some or all of the data would be useful. If this is a data frame, dput(head(my.data, 20)) should be enough data for us to work with. Edit you Q to include this info please. –  Gavin Simpson Apr 27 '11 at 19:54
    
@Gavin Simpson, sorry I took so long to reply - I have added the data that you suggest would be helpful to the question. Thank you for your assistance. –  KennyPeanuts Apr 28 '11 at 1:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Looking at utils:::str.default, we see that we get the usual output of int, num, etc., if the following if statement is true:

if (     is.vector(object) 
     || (is.array(object) && is.atomic(object))
     ||  is.vector(object, mode = "language") 
     || is.vector(object, mode = "symbol")
   )

We get atomic if this statement is false (and it would otherwise have been int, num, etc).

Looking at the help page for is.vector, we see that it returns true only if it's a vector with no attributes other than names. Here's a data frame where b has an extra attribute:

d <- data.frame(a=1:4, b=5:8)
attr(d$b, "tmp") <- "surprise!"

And calling str on it gives atomic for b instead of int.

> str(d)
'data.frame':   4 obs. of  2 variables:
 $ a: int  1 2 3 4
 $ b: atomic  5 6 7 8
  ..- attr(*, "tmp")= chr "surprise!"

I see in your edit that you have extra attributes on the elements of your data frame, and that you're getting these extra lines about your attributes as well, so it would seem that this explains it.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your input on my question. This does help me understand what is going on under the hood a bit better... I have added the dput data that was requested, hopefully this will make the issue clearer. –  KennyPeanuts Apr 28 '11 at 1:47
    
thanks for your answer. I removed the comments (i.e., extra attributes) and the mode in str went back to expected results. I just started adding the comments but I guess I am going to need a to find a different way to annotate my data frames. Thanks again –  KennyPeanuts Apr 28 '11 at 2:00
    
+1 For deciphering the str code. I saw that same statement, but failed to make the correct interpretation, as you did. –  Andrie Apr 28 '11 at 6:38

I believe your three questions essentially boil down to one thing.

The second column of str() returns the mode of the object, and not the class. The instruction ?atomic redirects to ?vector where it states: "The atomic modes are "logical", "integer", "numeric" (synonym "double"), "complex", "character" and "raw"."

Thus numeric is one of the modes of atomic.

mode refers to the storage mode of an object. See ?mode for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
But try getting str() to output atomic instead of the specific mode of the data... I think that is the thrust of the Q, as the comments above from the OP suggest. Why does it show atomic and not the real mode? –  Gavin Simpson Apr 27 '11 at 21:04
    
I'm glad that @Aaron posted the correct solution. –  Andrie Apr 28 '11 at 6:38

R divides data types into atomic and recursive. The things most people call vectors are all atomic (as mentioned by several people so far.) Lists can have arbitrary levels of complexity, i.e. lists within lists and will return FALSE from is.atomic(). Atomic vectors can have attributes without loosing their 'atomicity'.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but doesn't really answer the main thrust of the Q - why atomic and not the actual mode? How does one arrive at such an object? –  Gavin Simpson Apr 27 '11 at 21:05

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