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I want to perform Multi-request using Pycurl. Code is: m.add_handle(handle) requests.append((handle, response))

    # Perform multi-request.
    SELECT_TIMEOUT = 1.0
    num_handles = len(requests)
    while num_handles:
        ret = m.select(SELECT_TIMEOUT)
        if ret == -1: continue
        while 1:
            ret, num_handles = m.perform()
            print "In while loop of multicurl"
            if ret != pycurl.E_CALL_MULTI_PERFORM: break

Thing is, this loop takes forever to run. Its not terminating. Can any one tell me, what it does and what are the possible problems?

share|improve this question

Did you go through PyCurl official codes? The following code implement multi stuff and I tried executing it and I was able to crawl around 10,000 urls in 300 secs in parallel. I think this is exactly what you want to achieve? Correct me, if am wrong.

#! /usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: iso-8859-1 -*-
# vi:ts=4:et
# $Id: retriever-multi.py,v 1.29 2005/07/28 11:04:13 mfx Exp $

#
# Usage: python retriever-multi.py <file with URLs to fetch> [<# of
#          concurrent connections>]
#

import sys
import pycurl

# We should ignore SIGPIPE when using pycurl.NOSIGNAL - see
# the libcurl tutorial for more info.
try:
    import signal
    from signal import SIGPIPE, SIG_IGN
    signal.signal(signal.SIGPIPE, signal.SIG_IGN)
except ImportError:
    pass


# Get args
num_conn = 10
try:
    if sys.argv[1] == "-":
        urls = sys.stdin.readlines()
    else:
        urls = open(sys.argv[1]).readlines()
    if len(sys.argv) >= 3:
        num_conn = int(sys.argv[2])
except:
    print "Usage: %s <file with URLs to fetch> [<# of concurrent connections>]" % sys.argv[0]
    raise SystemExit


# Make a queue with (url, filename) tuples
queue = []
for url in urls:
    url = url.strip()
    if not url or url[0] == "#":
        continue
    filename = "doc_%03d.dat" % (len(queue) + 1)
    queue.append((url, filename))


# Check args
assert queue, "no URLs given"
num_urls = len(queue)
num_conn = min(num_conn, num_urls)
assert 1 <= num_conn <= 10000, "invalid number of concurrent connections"
print "PycURL %s (compiled against 0x%x)" % (pycurl.version, pycurl.COMPILE_LIBCURL_VERSION_NUM)
print "----- Getting", num_urls, "URLs using", num_conn, "connections -----"


# Pre-allocate a list of curl objects
m = pycurl.CurlMulti()
m.handles = []
for i in range(num_conn):
    c = pycurl.Curl()
    c.fp = None
    c.setopt(pycurl.FOLLOWLOCATION, 1)
    c.setopt(pycurl.MAXREDIRS, 5)
    c.setopt(pycurl.CONNECTTIMEOUT, 30)
    c.setopt(pycurl.TIMEOUT, 300)
    c.setopt(pycurl.NOSIGNAL, 1)
    m.handles.append(c)


# Main loop
freelist = m.handles[:]
num_processed = 0
while num_processed < num_urls:
    # If there is an url to process and a free curl object, add to multi stack
    while queue and freelist:
        url, filename = queue.pop(0)
        c = freelist.pop()
        c.fp = open(filename, "wb")
        c.setopt(pycurl.URL, url)
        c.setopt(pycurl.WRITEDATA, c.fp)
        m.add_handle(c)
        # store some info
        c.filename = filename
        c.url = url
    # Run the internal curl state machine for the multi stack
    while 1:
        ret, num_handles = m.perform()
        if ret != pycurl.E_CALL_MULTI_PERFORM:
            break
    # Check for curl objects which have terminated, and add them to the freelist
    while 1:
        num_q, ok_list, err_list = m.info_read()
        for c in ok_list:
            c.fp.close()
            c.fp = None
            m.remove_handle(c)
            print "Success:", c.filename, c.url, c.getinfo(pycurl.EFFECTIVE_URL)
            freelist.append(c)
        for c, errno, errmsg in err_list:
            c.fp.close()
            c.fp = None
            m.remove_handle(c)
            print "Failed: ", c.filename, c.url, errno, errmsg
            freelist.append(c)
        num_processed = num_processed + len(ok_list) + len(err_list)
        if num_q == 0:
            break
    # Currently no more I/O is pending, could do something in the meantime
    # (display a progress bar, etc.).
    # We just call select() to sleep until some more data is available.
    m.select(1.0)


# Cleanup
for c in m.handles:
    if c.fp is not None:
        c.fp.close()
        c.fp = None
    c.close()
m.close()
share|improve this answer

I think it is because you only break out of the first while loop

# Perform multi-request.
SELECT_TIMEOUT = 1.0
num_handles = len(requests)
while num_handles:                           #  while nr.1
    ret = m.select(SELECT_TIMEOUT)
    if ret == -1: continue
    while 1:                                 #  while nr.2
        ret, num_handles = m.perform()
        print "In while loop of multicurl"
        if ret != pycurl.E_CALL_MULTI_PERFORM: break
    '**'

so what happens if you use 'break', you will break out of the current while loop (you are in the second whileloop when you use break.) next step for the program would to take in the line written '**' here, since it's the last line it jumps back. (to the first line in the while num_handles) and then 3 lines further it runs into 'while 1:' and soforth.. and that's how you get the inf loop.

so to fix this would be:

# Perform multi-request.
SELECT_TIMEOUT = 1.0
num_handles    = len(requests)
while num_handles:                           #  while nr.1
    ret = m.select(SELECT_TIMEOUT)
    if ret == -1: continue
    while 1:                                 #  while nr.2
        ret, num_handles = m.perform()
        print "In while loop of multicurl"
        if ret != pycurl.E_CALL_MULTI_PERFORM: 
            break
    break

so what happens here, is as soon as it break's out of the nested while loop, it will automatically break out of the first loop too. (and it would never reach the line otherwise because of the while, and the continue used before

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain little bit? – Nisarg Apr 27 '11 at 23:44
    
this should do the trick – Buster Apr 30 '11 at 12:44

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