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I've created my own URLClassLoader, and set it as the system classloader via java.system.class.loader. It's initialized and everything, but the classes I'm trying to load aren't found. Here's the URLClassLoader:

public class LibraryLoader extends URLClassLoader
{
    public LibraryLoader(ClassLoader classLoader)
    {
        super(new URL[0], classLoader);
    }
    synchronized public void addJarToClasspath(String jarName) throws MalformedURLException, ClassNotFoundException
    {
        File filePath = new File(jarName);
        URI uriPath = filePath.toURI();
        URL urlPath = uriPath.toURL();

        System.out.println(filePath.exists());
        System.out.println(urlPath.getFile());

        addURL(urlPath);
    }
}

I've confirmed that the jar exists, and that the path is correct. This is how I call it in my program:

LibraryLoader loader = (LibraryLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
loader.addJarToClasspath("swt.jar");

This is the exception that I get (line 166 refers to the line at which I try to create a new Point:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: org/eclipse/swt/graphics/Point
        at mp.MyProgram.loadArchitectureLibraries(MyProgram.java:116)
        at mp.MyProgram.main(MyProgram.java:90)
Caused by: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point
        at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(Unknown Source)
        at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(Unknown Source)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)
        at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(Unknown Source)
        ... 2 more

I even tried explicitly loading the class like so:

Class.forName("org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point", false, loader);

What might be causing this? Shouldn't it "just work"?


Update: Here's the important code from MyProgram

public class MyProgram
{
    // ...

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        loadArchitectureLibraries();

        // ...
    }

    public static void loadArchitectureLibraries()
    {
        LibraryLoader loader = (LibraryLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();

        String architecture = System.getProperty("os.arch");
        try {
            if (architecture.contains("64")) {
                loader.addJarToClasspath("swt-3.6.1-win32-win32-x86_64.jar");
            } else {
                loader.addJarToClasspath("swt-3.6.1-win32-win32-x86.jar");
            }

            Class.forName("org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point", false, loader);
            org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point pt = new org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point(0, 0);

        } catch (Exception exception) {

            exception.printStackTrace();
            System.out.println("Could not load SWT library");
            System.exit(1);
        }
    }
}

Update 2: Here's an SSCCE: http://nucleussystems.com/files/myprogram.zip . Call java -Djava.system.class.loader=mp.LibraryLoader -jar myprogram.jar.

share|improve this question
1  
Could you please post the code of the MyProgram class, too? –  Sebastian Zarnekow Apr 27 '11 at 19:07
    
@Sebastian: added. –  Jonah Apr 27 '11 at 19:12
    
Does your class loader look in jre/ext? Does your jre/ext have anything important? What exception do you get if you do Class.forName("org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point", true, loader); –  Dilum Ranatunga Apr 27 '11 at 19:19
    
@Jonah: "I've confirmed that the jar exists, and that the path is correct." Nowhere in those code snippets does it call File.exists() or System.out.println(File.getCanonicalPath()) or similar, so we'll just have to take your word for it. (considers) Actually, no we don't have to do any such thing. Why don't you post an SSCCE? –  Andrew Thompson Apr 27 '11 at 19:23
1  
Do you get the NoClassDefFoundError on line org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point pt = new org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point(0, 0); ? Or is it thrown in the Class.forName(..) call? Could you please verify that MyProgram.class.getClassLoader() returns your LibraryClassLoader? –  Sebastian Zarnekow Apr 27 '11 at 20:06
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's visible from a (few) mile(s) away you are not using the custom classloader beside Class.forName

The ClassNoDefFoundError occurs since the classloader that has loaded current class MyProgram attempts to load org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point.

You need to load another class (call it launcher) via Class.forName and then start from there - implement some interface (even runnable will do) and call it.


edit

How to do it, a simplistic scenario.
1. Create another class called mp.loader.Launcher that implements Runnable like that.

public class Launcher implements Runnable{
public void run(){
  org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point pt = new org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point(0, 0);
  //whatever, start from here.
}
}

2. Place it in another jar called swt-loader.jar.

in MyProgram class use:

loader.addJarToClasspath("swt-loader.jar");
Runnable r = (Runnable) Class.forName("mp.loader.Launcher", true, loader);
r.run();//there you have
share|improve this answer
1  
Since the libary loader is the system class loader, it should be used to load the MyProgram class, too, shouldn't it? –  Sebastian Zarnekow Apr 27 '11 at 21:32
1  
@Sebastian Since the libary loader is the system class loader... it is not. The system loader is the one that has loaded the class w/ the main method (to put it simply) –  bestsss Apr 27 '11 at 22:24
1  
@Jonah, I guess you miss the aspect how class loading mechanism works in java, the classloader that has loader the currently executing class will be used to load new classes. I will edit the code to show how to do it properly. But the general idea is that you should place, yet another jar to bootstrap and operate the swt.jar one. Basically you want to access the classes in swt.jar ONLY from the very same loader. Failing to do so is basically why NoClassDefFoundError (rightfully) occurs. –  bestsss Apr 27 '11 at 22:28
1  
The command line arg -Djava.system.class.loader=mp.LibraryLoader was used to set the system class loader to the library loader. –  Sebastian Zarnekow Apr 27 '11 at 22:30
1  
@Jonah, if you have experience w/ web-apps they are a good example. [Well almost, since they web-apps loading breaks some standards but it's not important.] But practically the classes outside the web-app may not access any class residing into it. Indeed, you can export common interfaces to carry some task and that's the idea of using interfaces. –  bestsss Apr 27 '11 at 22:32
show 8 more comments

I would have to agree with the comments on this question. Based on the code you have provided, it would appear that you are getting the error due to the JAR files not being where you expect them to be. As mentioned by @Andrew, you are not checking the existence of the file in your addJarToClasspath method. As a result, if the file does not exist, you will receive a ClassNotFound exception as you are seeing. I verified this problem by taking your ClassLoader logic and passing it a valid and an invalid JAR. When a valid JAR/path was provided, the ClassLoader loaded the class as expected. When an invalid JAR/path was specified, I received the error you mentioned. The URLClassLoader does not throw an exception if an URL is specified that does not point to a valid file.

To validate the scenario, print out the path of the full path of your File and see if it is correct for the execution environment.

Edit


It appears that even if you override the system ClassLoader, the VM will still use the default sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader to load some classes. In my testing this includes the classes that are referenced from the main application. I'm sure there is a reason for this process, however, I am unable to ascertain it at this time. I have come up with a few solutions for you:

  • Use a script to detect the environment and set the classpath accordingly. This is perhaps the simplest solution, but one you may or may not want to take based on your particular requirements.
  • Similar to what was mentioned in other answers, specifically load and execute your application using your custom ClassLoader. This does not mean creating a single class that will be loaded and then invoke your application. It means that any class that needs to interact with the dynamically loaded swt libraries and any classes that need to reference your application classes should be loaded from your custom ClassLoader. Any application dependencies, such as log4j, etc, can be referenced by the default application ClassLoader. Here is an example of how this would work:

JAR 1 (launcher.jar):

public class AppLauncher {
    public static void main(String… args) throws Exception {
        ClassLoader loader = initClassLoader();
        Class<?> mpClass = loader.loadClass("mp.MyProgram");

        // using Runnable as an example of how it can be done
        Runnable mpClass = (Runnable) mpClass.newInstance();
    }
    public static ClassLoader initClassLoader() {
        // assuming still configured as system classloader, could also be initialized directly
        LibraryLoader loader = (LibraryLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();

        // add the main application jar to the classpath.  
        // You may want to dynamically determine this value (lib folder) or pass it in as a parameter
        loader.addJarToClasspath("myapp.jar");

        String architecture = System.getProperty("os.arch");
        try {
            if (architecture.contains("64")) {
                loader.addJarToClasspath("swt-3.6.1-win32-win32-x86_64.jar");
            } else {
                loader.addJarToClasspath("swt-3.6.1-win32-win32-x86.jar");
            }

            Class.forName("org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point", false, loader);
            org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point pt = new org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point(0, 0);

        } catch (Exception exception) {

            exception.printStackTrace();
            System.out.println("Could not load SWT library");
            System.exit(1);
        }
        return loader;
    }

JAR 2 (myapp.jar): Includes all class which depend on swt

public class MyProgram implements Runnable {
    //…
    public void run() {
    // perform application execution

           // this logic should now work
           org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point pt = new org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point(0,0);
    }
}

The AppLauncher class would be executed by the VM without the rest of your application being included in the execution Jar.

java -Djava.system.class.loader=test.LibraryLoader -cp <dependency jars>:launcher.jar mp.AppLauncher

I see that there have been updates to the other answers. Since I already had typed up the above comments, I figured that I should still post it for your perusal.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, it's correct. I checked exists(), and the path manually. I'm creating an SSCCE right now... –  Jonah Apr 27 '11 at 20:03
    
Wow, thanks for all the research. But @Sebastian just got it working for me, without a separate jar :) –  Jonah Apr 27 '11 at 22:44
    
Not a problem, always here to help. –  Kris Babic Apr 27 '11 at 22:53
    
I see now that you're saying the same thing as @bestsss. +1 :) –  Jonah Apr 28 '11 at 16:34
add comment

Since the offending line is not the Class.forName but the actual initialization of an instance of Point, we'll have to make sure that the class, that tries to load the Point class, was created by the Library class loader. Therefore, I made some minor changes in the LibraryLoader accordingt to this blog entry

public class LibraryLoader extends URLClassLoader {

    public LibraryLoader(ClassLoader classLoader) {
        super(new URL[0], classLoader);
    }

    synchronized public void addJarToClasspath(String jarName)
            throws MalformedURLException, ClassNotFoundException {
        File filePath = new File(jarName);
        URI uriPath = filePath.toURI();
        URL urlPath = uriPath.toURL();

        System.out.println(filePath.exists());
        System.out.println(urlPath.getFile());

        addURL(urlPath);
    }

    @Override
    public Class<?> loadClass(String name, boolean resolve) throws ClassNotFoundException {
        if ("mp.MyProgram".equals(name)) {
            return getClass(name);
        }
        return super.loadClass(name, resolve);
    }

    private Class<?> getClass(String name) throws ClassNotFoundException {
        String file = name.replace('.', File.separatorChar) + ".class";
        byte[] b = null;
        try {
            b = loadClassData(file);
            Class<?> c = defineClass(name, b, 0, b.length);
            resolveClass(c);
            return c;
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
    }

    private byte[] loadClassData(String name) throws IOException {
        InputStream stream = getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream(
                name);
        int size = stream.available();
        byte buff[] = new byte[size];
        DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(stream);
        in.readFully(buff);
        in.close();
        return buff;
    }
}

In the program itself, we have to extract a new method since all the classes, that are used from within a method, seem to be loaded up-front:

public class MyProgram {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LibraryLoader loader = (LibraryLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();

        String architecture = System.getProperty("os.arch");
        try {
            loader.addJarToClasspath("swt.jar");
            otherMethod();

        } catch (Throwable exception) {
            // println instead of logger because logging is useless at this level
            exception.printStackTrace();
            System.out.println("Could not load SWT library");
            System.exit(1);
        }
    }

    protected static void otherMethod() {
        org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point pt = new org.eclipse.swt.graphics.Point(0, 0);
        System.out.println("Works!");
    }
}

That should work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
@Sebastian: I tried it, but I get the same error. Strangely, when I try to access the class loader from inside of the thread, it says it's not my LibraryLoader. So I got it by setting the loader variable to final. –  Jonah Apr 27 '11 at 20:34
    
this will not work, the CCL is used entirely differently. You need the Runnable impl to be loaded by the libraryLoader –  bestsss Apr 27 '11 at 21:15
    
@bestsss: what exactly do you mean by "load the runnable with libraryLoader"? –  Jonah Apr 27 '11 at 21:23
    
Unfortunately, the LibraryLoader will first delegate to the original system classloader which will load the runnable. The runnable's class will be associated with that 'system' class loader and thereby not see the swt.Point. –  Sebastian Zarnekow Apr 27 '11 at 21:25
    
@Sebastian: so you're saying that this particular method won't work? –  Jonah Apr 27 '11 at 21:35
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